Word of the day

April 17, 2020

Precarity – the state of having insecure employment or income; a state of existence in which material provision and psychological wellness are adversely affected by a lack of regular or secure income;  a precarious existence, lacking in predictability, job security, material or psychological welfare.


Sowell says

April 17, 2020


Rural round-up

April 17, 2020

Pig-headed butcher ruling causing issues – Nigel Malthus:

The country’s pork producers say relaxation of the COVID-19 lockdown rules might still not be enough to prevent an animal welfare crisis on the country’s pig farms.

They say pig farming is geared almost entirely to domestic consumption, depends on weekly throughput with no spare capacity, and unlike red meat has no established export market to take up the slack.

With the forced closure of restaurants and independent butchers, they are hurting, says NZ Pork chief executive David Baines. . .

Coronavirus: Lingering drought prompts more calls to rural helpline during Covid-19 – Lawrence Gullery:

Tight feed supplies and the ongoing drought has pushed up calls to the Rural Support Trust’s national helpline as more farmers seek help.

The trust’s national chairperson, Neil Bateup, said there had been a 40 per cent increase in calls since the dry weather started to grip the country in February.

He said traditionally the trust records around 35 calls at this time of the year but it was now up to 50.

“Difficulties around the drought, particularly low feed supply, would be the main reasons for the increase but we’ve got all of the other issues around financial planning, wellness, unemployment, relationships that are still coming in too.” . .

Coronavirus: tulip bulb export still a grey area – Rachael Kelly:

Tulip exporter Rudi Verplancke says it was a relief to watch a truck leave his plant in Southland with the hope to fulfil export orders.

The bulb growers have had 150 million bulbs sitting in storage, collectively worth $32 million, that are destined for lucrative northern hemisphere markets.

Triflor operations manager Rudi Verplancke said it was “a very big relief” to see an order leave the company’s plant near Edendale on Thursday morning but it was still a grey area regarding final permission to export. . .

Essential food teams need more staff:

Keeping food on the table is trickier under COVID-19 physical distancing conditions, but Hawke’s Bay’s food producers are focused on the task.

Hastings’ primary industry starred in national media this week, with a call for more workers. The need to keep everyone safe through physical distancing, from pickers in the field to the staff in pack houses and processing factories, means more people are needed across a whole range of steps in the food production process.

Hastings mayor Sandra Hazlehurst is focused on ensuring people who may have lost their normal employment because of the virus are aware of other opportunities available.

“Our economy is our fertile land and what we harvest from it. To keep our economy moving, we must support our primary producers and keep our people in jobs.” . . .

Positive 2019 result gives certainty in disrupted global environment:

Silver Fern Farms Co-operative has reported a net profit after tax of $34.9m for the 2019 financial year. Its investment, Silver Fern Farms Limited, reported a net profit after tax of $70.7m for the 2019 financial year.

Silver Fern Farms Co-operative Chairman Richard Young said the financial result achieved by the Co-operative and Silver Fern Farms Limited for the 2019 year provides stability for both the Co-operative and the operating company.

“The Co-operative is in a strong position with no debt. Whilst this was achieved last year, we now have a strong platform to weather a period where our country and the world is in a period of considerable economic uncertainty.” . .

Avoparty with avocados:

NZ Avocado have teamed up with dinner party pop-up professionals, Kitchen Takeover, to unite separated friends and family around virtual dining tables during lockdown.

NZ Avocado and Kitchen Takeover want to help Kiwis connect with each other through food whilst they are apart, by providing the tools needed to host a virtual dinner parties at home.

#Avopartyanyway is a virtual dinner experience designed to be as heart-warming and fun as before lockdown began. Participants invite their friends, set up a video call, and get inspired by easy to follow, fun and healthy recipes. . .

 


Music for Hope

April 17, 2020

Andrea Bocelli gives us music for hope, live from Duomo di Milano.

 


What is govt hiding?

April 17, 2020

Why isn’t the government releasing Crown Law advice about the Covid-19 lockdown?

The Government has a duty to New Zealanders to release the legal advice it has received about Police being able to enforce the lockdown rules, National’s Justice spokesperson Mark Mitchell says.

“When an entire country is in lockdown, the case for public interest could not be higher and far outweighs any decision to withhold the advice.

We have never experienced a situation in this country where people’s civil liberties have been eroded so quickly and without clear direction. The public has a right to know the legal advice which allowed this to happen.

“There was huge confusion amongst the public about what the rules are with both the Prime Minister and former Police Commissioner contradicting each other.

The confusion and contradictions undermine confidence.

“Even now with the Section 70 notice from the Ministry of Health it’s important New Zealanders understand what powers the Police have and how those decisions have been made.  

If we’re to keep the rules it’s only fair we know the reasoning behind them.

“Mr Parker arrogantly told the Epidemic Response Committee that if people don’t like the advice being withheld – they can take it to court.

People are getting sick of being locked down. We’re questioning the arbitrary  nature of  some of the restrictions. We need, and deserve, understanding and information, not arrogance.

“The public has been incredibly understanding and compliant during these extraordinary times. They have a right to know how decisions are being made that affect them. The Attorney General should waive legal privilege and release the advice.”

We are being asked to accept unprecedented restrictions on what we can do and where we can do.

People are losing businesses and jobs. Some are having medical diagnosis and treatment delayed. The battle against Covid-19 is being waged at a huge financial and social cost.

The government keeps telling us the lockdown with all the loss of choice and liberty it imposes, is necessary.

It’s only fair to let us know the legal basis for what we’re being expected accept.

Refusal to do so begs the question: what are they hiding?

 


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