Word of the day

15/04/2020

Glabriety – baldness.


Sowell says

15/04/2020


Rural round-up

15/04/2020

New research indicates NZ’s sheep and beef greenhouse gas emissions have been overstated:

AgResearch has developed a more accurate calculation of the nitrous oxide emissions from sheep, beef and dairy production, which shows that nitrous oxide emissions are two thirds and one third respectively lower than previously thought.

The new nitrous oxide measurement will reduce each sector’s total greenhouse gas emission by the following:

    • Total sheep emissions (including methane and nitrous oxide emissions) will be around 10.6 percent lower than previously reported. 
    • Total beef cattle emissions (including methane and nitrous oxide emissions) will be 5.0 percent lower than previously reported. . . 

Workers give up Eater break to clear logjam at meat plants – Eric Frykberg:

Staff at 12 meat plants run by Silver Fern Farms worked on Good Friday and Easter Monday to try to catch up with a serious backlog of animals needing to be processed.

The company won’t give any numbers because of commercial confidentiality but says a dent was made in the logjam of stock at hardpressed processing plants.

The problem arose even before the Covid-19 crisis, when drought killed off grass growth on many New Zealand paddocks, leaving little feed available for livestock.

To solve this problem, farmers sent their stock to the works early, creating a backlog of stock in waiting yards. . . 

Shearing not cut out – Pam Tipa:

Shearing has been deemed an essential service, but people must come first, says Mike Barrowcliffe, NZ Shearing Contractors Association president.

“The last thing an 80-year-old farmer wants is a whole lot of young people who haven’t been self-isolating turning up to his place to shear his sheep,” he says.

Everyone should put safety first throughout the whole supply chain – from the farmers themselves to contractor employees, Barrowcliffe told Rural News.

“They need to ask the questions, is it essential and can it wait?” he says. . . 

Vet firm uneasy over what services to offer – Sally Rae:

It’s not business as usual for vets — despite what the public’s perception might be, Oamaru vet Simon Laming says.

Mr Laming, of Veterinary Centre Ltd, which has clinics throughout the region, expressed concerns about the services the business should continue to offer, and the public perception of continuing to operate as an essential service.

A visit from police recently followed a complaint from a member of the public who had seen two people in one of the Veterinary Centre’s trucks.

What had been difficult to establish was exactly what services should be offered as guidelines were not very specific, Mr Laming said. . . 

Meat Industry Association calls for fair treatment in renewable energy targets:

New Zealand’s meat processing sector will need more time if it is to meet proposed targets for renewable energy, says the Meat Industry Association (MIA).

Sirma Karapeeva, Chief Executive of the MIA, said the vast cost of converting coal-fired boilers to alternative heating by the proposed deadline of 2030 would place huge pressure on an industry that is already facing significant headwinds.

If the proposals go ahead in their current form, the sector would not be able to absorb the estimated $80 million capital cost of converting to direct electric, heat pump or biomass options in such a short time frame. . . 

Wattie’s is setting production records to help supermarkets meet consumer demand:

Teams of employees in Wattie’s factories in Hawke’s Bay, Christchurch and Auckland have been working as never before to help keep supermarkets stocked in their efforts to satisfy consumer demand in these unprecedent times of the Covid-19 crisis.

The range of products include Wattie’s tomato sauce, Wattie’s baked beans & spaghetti, soups and canned and frozen meals, frozen peas and mixed vegetables, and dips. On top of these are the seasonal products like peaches, pears and beetroot.

All this while, the country’s largest tomato harvesting and processing season is underway in Hawke’s Bay. Harvesting started on February 21 and is scheduled to continue until April 22. With social distancing requirements extending to the fields, the job of harvest operators can become very lonely with 12-hour shifts. . . 


Earth Angels

15/04/2020

Hegsy and The Elements pay tribute to essential workers:


Still not enough PPE

15/04/2020

The message from the top is that New Zealand has enough personal protective equipment (PPE) for people who need it.

The message further down the chain contradicts that:

Newshub has obtained more evidence of the gulf between the Ministry of Health and nurses about what’s happening on the frontline with masks and personal protective equipment (PPE).

An audio recording between a charge nurse and staff member reveals the reality of the frustration heath workers face in their efforts to wear masks to protect themselves from coronavirus.

“If you are telling me that you are insisting on wearing a mask at work, I don’t know what to say – we are stopping other people doing that,” the nurse can be heard telling the staff member.

“We are directed that staff can’t wear masks.” . . 

These concerns are not isolated to just one hospital; a nurse at Burwood Hospital, for instance – where six of New Zealand’s nine COVID-19 deaths have occured – says staff even on the COVID-19 ward do not have adequate protection.

They’re on the frontline of the COVID-19 crisis and want to do all they can to protect themselves and their patients, but requests for masks are being blocked by their managers.  . .

A major healthcare provider says it’s struggling to get even a week’s worth of PPE:

Green Cross Health is a provider of primary health care services through pharmacies, GP clinics and home health care and community nursing.

Group chief executive Rachael Newfield said they were struggling to get PPE for their community health division.

“We undertake 60,000 personal cares, which are close contact carers looking after an individual in their home every week.

“To date, from the 20 DHBs, we have received just 30,000 masks, so that isn’t enough to last a week, if we allow our staff to feel safe and follow the latest guidance,” she said.

Newfield said the amount of PPE they could receive also differed between individual DHBs, and stocks from local suppliers were also tight.

When the message to the public is to protect ourselves why doesn’t the health service have enough PPE for all the staff who need it?

Yesterday a third of people with Covid-19 were health workers.

The number of health workers in New Zealand with Covid-19 has jumped by nearly 60 percent in just four days.

On Wednesday, 64 healthcare workers had contracted the virus but that figure had leapt to 101 by Sunday.

Of the 110 new confirmed and probable Covid-19 cases in the intervening period, 37 of them – more than a third – were health staff. . . 

Not all The health workers contracted the disease through work but that some did makes it even more important that all of them have PPE when and where they need it.

Director-General of Health Ashley Bloomfield said the situation was worrying.

“I’m concerned about any case in a healthcare worker, particularly where it happens in the workplace,” he said.

“We’ve got some information about the cases that are healthcare workers and what I’ve asked the team for particular analysis of is, of the cases that have happened in the workplace, how was it that they were infected? So was that through being part of caring for someone with Covid-19 or was it because they are part of a cluster where they may be a close contact of another staff member?” . . .

And was it because staff don’t have the PPE they need?

The incidence of disease in health workers takes the edge off the hope that comes from the decline in the number of new cases.

That downward trend will have to continue before the government decides to let us out of the level 4 lockdown and giving health workers the PPE they need will help that.

Yesterday Treasury outlined various scenarios showing  the economic impact of the lockdown:

Treasury scenarios released by the Government show unemployment could reach up to 26 percent if the coronavirus lockdown is extended beyond four weeks.

The data shows the range of scenarios Treasury has predicted for the New Zealand economy, based on assumptions of different amounts of time under the four COVID-19 alert levels.

The scenarios show that unemployment can be kept below 10 percent, and return to 5 percent next year, if the Government is willing to provide additional financial support. . .

The economic and social costs of the lockdown are already too high.

We can not afford to have it extended, especially if the extension was due to an increase in infections because health workers don’t have the PPE they need to keep themselves safe.


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