Word of the day

March 30, 2020

Malison – curse, malediction; to speak ill of.


Sowell says

March 30, 2020


Rural round-up

March 30, 2020

Essentially we are struggling – Sarah Perriam:

It’s a nice feeling to be essential huh?

But, farming in New Zealand is facing the perfect storm of challenges, which makes it hard to provide that essential service.

This week in Sarah’s Country we talk to to Lochie Macgillivray from the Hawke’s Bay Rural Advisory Group who talks about the layers of mounting situations that the region’s farmers face from movement control with M bovis and the TB outbreak, water and feed storage issues and livestock returned from processors due to Covid-19 – all while being in drought.  . . 

Rural businesses carrying on – Annette Scott:

Being there for farmers is what Ruralco is about, chief executive Rob Sharkie says.

“And that means through all times where at all possible, the good and the not so good. 

“It’s about looking after our backyarders. That’s what we are set up to do.”

On the first day of the level three covid-19 Ruralco had 900 people through the doors.

“Nine hundred customers in one day is very busy but it wasn’t panic buying, it was the uncertainty. . . 

Covid-19: Farmer lobby’s strength on display :

Federated Farmers president Katie Milne says COVID-19 has highlighted the strength of the farmer lobby. “

It shows the strength of Federated Farmers that we’re being looked to as the ‘go to’ source of advice and conduit of essential information to the agriculture sector during Covid-19,” she told Feds members in an email last night.

“We’ve found answers to pretty much every question our members have fired at us over the last week or two and it’s all summarised on our website and in the regular advisories we’ve emailed.” . . 

Food sector to continue as normal: Professor – Alice Scott:

It is business as usual for farmers around the country, despite Covid-19.

Emeritus Prof Frank Griffin says that as the nation scrambles to contain the virus, the food sector will continue as normal.

Prof Griffin has spent a career in animal health research.

He also has a strong interest in New Zealand’s food production systems and he is director of Agriculture at Otago (Ag@Otago), an initiative launched in 2016, involving more than 60 Otago researchers with active interests in agriculture. . . 

New associate director for Beef + Lamb board:

Wairarapa farmer Kate Wyeth has been appointed this year’s associate director on the Beef + Lamb New Zealand board.

Wyeth, who alongside her husband James, farms a 380ha sheep and beef farm in the Northern Wairarapa has a background in farm consultancy with BakerAg and is a facilitator on the Agri-Women’s Development Trust and chairperson on the Opaki School Board of Trustees.

She says she is excited by the opportunity to learn from and contribute to c’s governance team. . . 

Badge ‘just a tremendous honour’ – Toni Williams:

“It’s just a tremendous honour,” Women’s Institutes stalwart Jude Vaughan, the unsuspecting recipient of a WI Good Service Badge, said.

Mrs Vaughan was completely taken aback when presented with the award at the Mid Canterbury Federation of WI’s annual general meeting after a secret nomination of her peers at Lowcliffe WI.

“It just blows you away, it’s not for me, it’s for the organisation. The acknowledgement from your peers, that means so much,” she said.

In nominating Mrs Vaughan, members of Lowcliffe WI said: “She is very proactive member wanting to spread the WI word and fly our banner when possible. . . 


Supercovidfragilistic

March 30, 2020

Daniel Matarazzo has repurposed Supercalifragilisticexpialidosis:

 


Farmer’s Voice – Robyn and Mark Copland

March 30, 2020

Farmer’s Voice:

Successful in sheep breeding, dog trials and recently being voted in as ambassadors for the Christchurch Agricultural Show, even following a tragic family event Mid-Canterbury farmers Mark and Robyn Copland are navigating life’s trials with humility.


Some can learn from others’ mistakes

March 30, 2020

It’s early days, but most people are responding responsibly to the draconian requirements of the state of emergency.

News of the escalating rate of Covid-19 overseas and here, including the first death*, is helping keep people in their isolation bubbles.

But acceptance and compliance won’t last long if the shutdown doesn’t work, or there’s a second wave because there’s too little testing, or because the disease keeps on being imported.

Deaths from the disease will be counted and broadcast. It will be harder to track those caused by the economic and social cost of the shut down but they will come.

Businesses will fail, homes will be lost, suicides and domestic violence will increase.

A four-week shutdown that eliminates the disease and saves lives might justify all that, but only if the disease is eliminated and stays out of the country and we are then able to get the economy up and functioning at full speed again.

That will mean closing the borders completely, or requiring all arrivals to be quarantined for two weeks. Trusting people to self-isolate before the shutdown didn’t work and it won’t work afterwards.

Had it done so, Covid-19 would have been confined to people who contracted it overseas and we wouldn’t have to be locked down.

Some of us can learn from others’ mistakes, their rest of us have to be the other people.

The government didn’t learn from the mistakes other countries made in not closing borders properly.

Until it decides that all arrivals will be quarantined, it’s not even learning from its own mistake in not going harder, sooner.

* The person who died had an underlying condition which begs the question was the death due to Covid-19 or the underlying condition?


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