Word of the day

February 20, 2020

Acculturation – assimilation to a different culture, typically the dominant one; cultural modification of an individual, group, or people by adapting to or borrowing traits from another culture; merging of cultures as a result of prolonged contact; a process of cultural exchange wherein a person or group adopts elements of another; the process of changing so that you become more like people from a different culture or making someone change in this way; the transfer of values and customs from one group to another.

Hat tip: Point of Order


Thatcher thinks

February 20, 2020


Rural round-up

February 20, 2020

West Coast man decries government’s ‘blatant attack on property rights’ :

An elderly West Coast man has appealed to the government not to take his land, after more than 70 percent of it was classed as a Significant Natural Area.

Tony Barrett, 86, lives alone on his 607ha block on the Arnold Valley Road, east of Greymouth.

Barrett’s grandparents first leased the land near Notown from the government in the 1930s after it was cleared of trees, dug over and mined for gold by returned servicemen.

The Barretts left much of it undeveloped, and a large chunk of the formerly gorse-covered block is now regenerating native bush. . . 

Wild rabbit sellers say cost of audits driving them out of business:

Those trying to make a living from selling wild rabbits to restaurants and for pet food say they are being driven out of business by high compliance costs.

Shooters and processors spoken to by RNZ said audits up to every six weeks were over the top and they should not be treated in the same way as a large scale meat works.

Bob Thomson has run a sole operator rabbit processing plant on the outskirts of Christchurch for the past two decades, supplying wild rabbits to high end restaurants around the country and for pet food.

But he is drowning under a tsunami of paperwork. . .

Helping farmers tell their stories – Colin Williscroft:

There’s an increasing awareness of the need for farmers to tell their stories to help explain to urban New Zealanders the realities of life on the land and the contribution the primary sector makes to the country. Lisa Portas of Palliser Ridge is determined to help get those stories across, as Colin Williscroft found out.

 For farming stories to truly connect with an urban audience they not only have to be told well, they need to be authentic and that means they have to come from farmers themselves, Wairarapa farmer Lisa Portas says.

If that’s going to work farmers need to become more comfortable being their own narrators and not be afraid to use a range of channels from social media to open days to encourage a wider understanding of agricultural industries, the people involved, the processes and the reasons why decisions are made. . .

Around world and back to Synlait – Toni WIlliams:

Lachie Davidson has travelled to the other side of the world, been crowned a world champion egg thrower and has just embarked on a career with an internationally recognised company which prides itself as being an outside-the-box thinker.

The 22-year-old former Ashburton College head boy is one of four to gain a place in the Synlait Future Leaders Programme. More than 300 people applied.

Under the three-year accelerated development programme, developed by Synlait organisational development manager Tony Aitken, he will undergo leadership training as he learns different facets of the company. . .

LIC to seek shareholder approval to acquire 50% stake for $108.7 million in Israeli agritech company Afimilk:

    • The investment will strengthen LIC’s ability to deliver superior herd improvement services and agritech to its farmers.
    • The proposed 50% stake in Afimilk will help LIC keep its world-leading edge in pastoral dairy farming data while broadening access to new information to meet future needs and challenges.
    • Afimilk is profitable, has no debt and has historically paid dividends to its shareholders. . .

Rural market reflects external volatility:

Data released today by the Real Estate Institute of New Zealand (REINZ) shows there were 57 less farm sales (-13.6%) for the three months ended January 2020 than for the three months ended January 2019. Overall, there were 363 farm sales in the three months ended January 2020, compared to 345 farm sales for the three months ended December 2019 (+5.2%), and 420 farm sales for the three months ended January 2019. 1,277 farms were sold in the year to January 2020, 14.7% fewer than were sold in the year to January 2019, with 40.3% less Dairy farms, 3.9% less Grazing farms, 28.4% less Finishing farms and 9.8% less Arable farms sold over the same period.

The median price per hectare for all farms sold in the three months to January 2020 was $21,221 compared to $27,087 recorded for three months ended January 2019 (-21.7%). The median price per hectare decreased 7.7% compared to December 2019. . .


Talking teal

February 20, 2020

February is Ovarian Cancer Awareness month in New Zealand and Australia.

It’s a time to talk teal because not all cancers are pink.

One in 70 women will get ovarian cancer. In Australia four women are diagnosed with it every day and three of the four will not survive. The survival rate is just as bad in New Zealand.

One reason for that is that it is often diagnosed late because many don’t know the symptoms.

Dealing with a diagnosis of a rare and often fatal cancer, like low grade serous ovarian carcinoma, is hard.

Going public with your story is too.

But after my daughter got over the shock of the diagnosis she discovered her experience of later diagnosis was far too common and that there was very little awareness of, advocacy for, and research into, ovarian cancer. Jane decided that had to change and she was going to change it.

Sally Rae wrote Jane’s story in  survivor changing focus for the ODT. *

Clare de Lore wrote about Jane in  how an ovarian cancer patient is fighting the myth of the ‘silent killer’ for The Listener.

Katie Kenny interviewed her for we’re comfortable talking about breast cancer, but ovarian cancer remains a forgotten disease on Stuff.

Dunedin Central Rotary Club reviewed her speech here.

Jane has a blog janehascancer.com

If you missed my blog post with Jane’s story, you’ll find it at  living under cancer sword.

P.S.

* Milly, the lamb in the ODT photo was very much a city one. She was allowed inside until she got too big for disposable napkins, then she roamed the garden. However, while grazing the lawn was welcome her tree trimming was not so she moved up to our farm.

Like all pet lambs, she is no respecter of boundaries and has found her way to our house a few times.

 


Honest people keep rules

February 20, 2020

Serious Fraud Office investigations into political donations has prompted the inevitable calls for taxpayer funding of political parties.

The arguments the Taxpayers’ Union made against that six years ago still stand:

. . . “Politicians having to justify their work to supporters, members, and donors is healthy. Public funding would give a huge advantage to the established political parties. It professionalises politics and stamps on the grass roots.”

“The vast majority of donations made to political parties are small. That is a good thing. It means politicians and party bosses are accountable to many.”

Besides, whoever the funder is, there will have to be rules and where there’s rules there will be honest ones who keep them and dishonest ones who will break them.

The furor over alleged funding impropriety has also led to calls for full disclosure of every donation.

That is unnecessary.

People who donate to all sorts of causes, political or not, choose to do so anonymously for a variety of reasons including not wanting to show off their generosity.

A charitable trust of which I am a trustee has received a $20,000 donation this week and a $10,000 donation a couple of weeks ago. The donors in both cases prefer to keep their philanthropy quiet.

Charitable donations are different from political ones, but the right to privacy for donors of smaller amounts still stands.

If politicians can be bought for the amounts under the threshold for disclosure, it’s the politicians who are wrong not the threshold.

That said, the SFO investigations provide grounds for a look at current rules governing behavior of political parties including the powers and capacity the Electoral Commission has to initiate investigations and deal with complaints.

Election after election there are complaints that one party or another has breached the rules and election after election nothing is resolved until well after polling day.

If the commission had much stronger teeth and the capacity to investigate and, should it be necessary, act expediently

It might not stop the dishonest bending or breaking the rules but it would increase the chance of them being caught, should it be likely to influence an election, caught in time to ensure voters are informed before they vote.


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