Rural round-up

Looking after yourself on the farm: Mairi Whittle:

An inspirational mentor and a tragedy have shaped Mairi Whittle’s health and safety focus on the family farm she runs on her own near Taihape.

There weren’t formal health and safety processes in place when Mairi and her brothers were growing up on the 607 Ha sheep and beef farm at Makatote – although she says her parents did instill a strong awareness about ‘no go’ areas.

After studying at Lincoln, Mairi worked in rural banking for five years before heading off for her OE, which included working as a rousie and shepherd in Scotland and as a jillaroo in outback Australia. . . .

Primary exports to reach $48bn in 2020 – MPI:

Primary sector exports are forecast to lift more than 3 percent, according to the Ministry for Primary Industries’ latest quarterly situation and outlook report.

The report, released yesterday, predicts primary industry exports will reach nearly $48 billion for the year to June 2020.

That would be a rise of more than 3 percent on the previous financial year and was an improvement from MPI’s October forecast, which predicted the value of exports would drop by 0.1 percent. . .

Laura Vincent deserves a nice juicy steak – Cactus Kate:

Some poor woman called Laura Vincent has gone to the hell that is tasting “fake meat” for us.

I cannot think of anything more ghastly than being force fed fake meat.  Some real meat is bad enough.  If I am going to put calories into my body these days then I am not going to waste it with anything that is not delicious.

There are predictions that this will be all that people will eat in 50 years time. It is another reason that I am opposed to extending ones life beyond an average span.

The sorts of people who think “fake meat” is great are against genetic modification for everything else.  Dutifully forgetting that they are shoving half a lab down their throats when tasting this muck.  They seems to want to reproduce the smell, taste and texture of meat when many say they dislike all those qualities of meat. . .

Stalwart stickler for tradition – almost – Daniel Birchfield:

It is perhaps no surprise that the woman who is one of the driving forces behind Waimate’s annual Strawberry Fare loves everything about the fruit the event celebrates.

Strawberry Fare organising committee chairwoman Joy McIvor, of Waimate, prefers her strawberries the traditional way — with “cream and some icing sugar”.

However, she also does not mind them dipped in chocolate.

Mrs McIvor, who has been on the committee for 18 years, the past 15 as chairwoman, had little time to sample the fruit on Saturday, as she was hard at work making sure the event, staged at Boland Park and Seddon Square, ran smoothly. . .

Primary Sector Council merges science with the metaphysical in vision to guide the food and fibre sector – Point of Order;

The Primary Sector Council’s vision for the country’s vital food and fibre sector (you can check it out here) promotes the government’s programme for blending science with the Maori belief system.

In a press statement, Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor welcomed the “vision to unite the primary sector”, although he did not mention advice to unite science with matauranga Maori.

But on the vision website we learned: . . .

Once a day milking:

Once-a-day (OAD) milking is the practice of milking cows only once during a 24 hour period. This differs from the traditional twice-a-day (TAD) milking regime.

OAD milking can be used either strategically (long-term) as the overall farming system or tactically as a short-term response to adverse seasonal conditions.

Reasons to consider OAD milking

There are a number of reasons to consider OAD, the advantages of which will depend on the current farm system or layout e.g. long distances walked by cows. . .

Rural recycling rates soar, but more solutions needed:

Rural recycling has seen unprecedented gains, with rates soaring to 43 percent above last year’s figures. The programme responsible for these results supports government proposals to rethink plastics but says there is an urgent need for local recycling solutions to generate greater recycling rates for a wider selection of rural plastics.

If a wider variety of plastic can be recycled, less plastic waste will build up in rural areas and fewer harmful practices, such as burning and burying, will be deployed to dispose of it. This will benefit our environment and our wildlife. . .

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