Word of the day

December 16, 2019

Euneirophrenia –  the feeling of wanting to go back to sleep in attempt to finish a pleasant dream; the feeling of contentment that comes from waking up from a pleasant dream;  a pleasant, happy state of mind one has after a good dream.


Thatcher thinks

December 16, 2019


Rural round-up

December 16, 2019

Report: imbue meat brands with regional character – Sally Rae:

Identifying regional appellations for New Zealand red meat — much like the global wine industry — has been suggested in a report on shaping the future of the red meat sector.

Beef + Lamb New Zealand commissioned Kantar Singapore and worked with industry partners to develop the report which was released this week.

It identified seven key trends, including growth in alternative models of health and an “explosion” of personalised health data, emerging technology driving consumer purchasing decisions, a resistance to industrialised food production and a desire for total transparency.

It recommended the sector continue its push towards food products “tied to a unique New Zealand culture”. . . 

Flood danger could last months – Annette Scott:

A week after South Canterbury’s flood authorities have warned the risk will remain for months.

Restoring flood protection damaged by the Rangitata River could take months. Meantime, the river remains in a sensitive state so farmers must take extreme care, Civil Defence said.

Authorities report the flooding as an extreme event with 860mm of rain falling in the Rangitata River headwaters causing major flooding that cut off bridges, closed major roading networks and inundated large chunks of farmland.

One of the worst affected areas was Rangitata Island, much of which still remains under water. . . 

Small footprint but many jobs – Hugh Stringleman:

Pioneering pathways in hydroponic growing of soft berries in Northland have taken the Malley family’s horticultural business a long way from where it started only eight years ago.

In 2011 orchardist, industry representative and company director Dermott Malley, his wife Linzi and their son Patrick and his wife Rebecca landed at Maungatapere, near Whangarei.

Dermott and Linzi were former Hawke’s Bay growers of apples, pears and summerfruit.

Patrick was a young entrepreneur in Auckland and Rebecca a veterinarian. . . 

Leader brings rich life experience – Yvonne O’Hara:

It is quite a leap from the Isle of Man, in the Irish Sea, to a dairy farm in Mossburn.

Along the way, Alexa Smith farmed in Missouri, helped organise the 2011 Rugby World Cup, the Winter Games and Warbirds over Wanaka in New Zealand, and was involved in the Commonwealth Games in Glasgow.

Now she is married with a toddler, rears calves and is the Dairy Women’s Network’s regional leader for northern Southland.

She is married to dairy farmer Bradley Smith and helps when needed as a relief milker and calf rearer and also does the business’ bookwork when 2-year-old Vaila is not keeping her busy. . . 

Concern over fire risk during long dry summers :

Fire and Emergency has launched a new summer wildfire prevention campaign using three well-known native New Zealand birds.

Its national advisor for fire risk management, Pete Gallagher, said with a warmer environment this year he’s concerned about the fire risk going into summer.

He said 65 percent of wildfires are caused by controlled burns, and cooking and camping fires getting out of control. . . 

Jersey cows model matching Christmas jumpers :

A farmer has dressed her cows in Christmas jumpers to spread some seasonal cheer to passers-by.

The five cows have been sporting the matching knitwear while grazing on their farm in St Saviour, Jersey.

Dairy farmer and self-confessed Christmas enthusiast Becky Houzé designed the patterned jumpers for her Jersey girls as a festive treat. . .

 


Pachelbel’s Canon

December 16, 2019

This is the third time in a couple of weeks, I’ve posted a version of Pachelbel’s Canon, but I couldn’t resist the creativity in this one :

. . .YouTuber Pavel Jirásek has reworked Pachelbel’s Canon for 3 violins and basso continuo with a grand selection of blaring train horns, apparently collected from footage taken around the UK and Europe.

The horns, pitch-perfectly assembled, are synced to a backing track. Pavel made the video back in 2017, but it’s just been rediscovered and people are appreciating its magnificence. . . 


Bigger not better for media

December 16, 2019

Stuff and NZME have enlisted an unlikely ally in their quest to merge:

NZ First leader Winston Peters has thrown his support behind NZME buying rival news agency Stuff, saying such a deal is in the “national interest”.

NZME, publisher of the NZ Herald, has sought the Government’s support to buy Stuff, which is owned by Australian media company Nine.

The proposal is being considered by Broadcasting, Communications and Digital Media Minister Kris Faafoi.

Peters today threw his weight behind NZME’s proposal saying it “is in the greater public interest and the national interest”. . . 

One of the commitments would be to keep a certain number of regional newspaper titles open, Peters said. Regional news was “as important as a hospital, as important as a school” in provincial areas. . . 

Business and media should know that if the government is the answer they’ve asked the wrong question.

Newspapers have been losing readers for decades and all mainstream media is struggling with so much competition from online news sources, but the answer is not for newspaper companies to get bigger, it is for them to get smaller and more local, as Karl du Fresne, writing about the Wairarapa Times-Age, said:

. . .if any papers could survive in the new media environment, it would be those that specialised in local news. Not only is local news important to people because it directly affects them in their daily lives, but it’s also the segment of the market that has been least disrupted by the internet. If you want local news, you must get it from a local provider. . . 

If the success of the Oamaru Mail is an example, smaller and more local is a far better way to go.

I started my journalism career on the Oamaru Mail way back when it was a daily paper and the first in the country to use computer printing.

It is now a weekly give-away, and its healthy size is evidence that it has the support of readers and the advertisers that fund it.

Its owned by Allied Press which also owns the Otago Daily Times (ODT), the only privately owned daily paper in New Zealand.

The Oamaru Mail succeeds because it concentrates on local news, written by people who live in and know the district it serves, its people and issues.

The ODT is following other daily papers with a drop in circulation, but it’s losing readers at a much slower rate than those owned by the companies wanting to merge.

One reason for the slower decline is that its hatched, matched and dispatched advertisements are available in the paper on the digital edition, not the free online version. This ensures older readers keep buying it.

Another reason is that it too has teams of local reporters throughout its circulation area ensuring that local stories get good coverage with the national and international news and views.

Rather than allowing the two big companies to merge and become even bigger while attempting to keep local papers alive by insisting some regional titles stay open, it would be better to sell the smaller titles and let them thrive as local papers, with local staff covering local issues for their local communities.


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