Word of the day

August 29, 2019

Transtendinous  – through the tendon.


Thatcher thinks

August 29, 2019


Rural round-up

August 29, 2019

The crisis of confidence undermining our primary industries is untenable – Todd Muller:

I have always held the view that families’ most honest conversations occur at the dinner table, often as the used plates wait to be returned to the bench and the wine is closer to the bottom of the glass.

As a child, I can recall my parents’ discussions, as they struggled with every waking effort to hold onto the kiwifruit orchard in the downturn of the early 1990s. Well New Zealand you need to know that the conversations happening in our rural homes across the country are the tensest in a generation.

There is a palpable sense of stress and unrelenting pressure. The sort that makes your guts churn, the sort that can and does lead to more tragic outcomes. Our primary industries and the families that work in them feel isolated and undervalued. For some it feels like being under attack. I am not prone to hyperbole, I use the word deliberately. . . .

Is there an emerging rural divide? – Julia Jones:

The success of the food and fibre sector will be defined by how well we can align and adapt, with the focus being the ‘whole’ sector, not competing subsectors, writes Julia Jones.

We hear lots of talk about the urban-rural divide, but of late, as I travel around the country, I find myself asking, “Is there is an emerging rural-rural divide?”

I’m fortunate to get to talk to a variety of people from a variety of subsectors in the food and fibre sector, and without fail someone within each group (from anywhere in the value chain) will mention that they see the sun setting on another subsector. . . 

Farmers band together to improve local waterway:

Finding the balance between making a profit and farming sustainably has always been at the forefront of Fonterra farmer Paul Warneford’s mind. 

“Swimming in our local rivers, white baiting, doing things us Kiwis love doing, while having a sustainable farming practice is the ultimate goal,” says Paul. 

In 2015, 12 dairy farmers started the Nukuhou North and Waiotahi River Streams Group, aiming to improve the sustainability of their farming operations.

The group was formed after Agri-ecology consultant Alison Dewes spoke to a group of farmers about sustainable farming and finding a sweet spot around environment, profit and production.  . .

Ensuring success of A&P shows – David Hill:

Sheep and cattle at A&P shows go together like candy-floss and Ferris wheels. Cattle have been missing at some shows recently in the wake of the Mycoplasma bovis outbreak but are set to make a return at several Canterbury shows.

For the Canterbury A&P Association’s new president Chris Herbert, the inclusion of cattle is an important part of show day. It was often the only chance city folk had to get up close with sheep and cattle, reinforcing the importance of A&P shows in bringing together town and country.

Agricultural shows are essential to maintaining connections with urban communities, Chris Herbert says.

As he looks ahead to this year’s New Zealand Agricultural Show, the Canterbury A&P Association president said the shows were often the only chance city folk had to get up close with sheep and cattle. . . 

Scales lifts 1H sales across all divisions, reaffirms annual guidance –  Rebecca Howard:

(BusinessDesk) – Agribusiness Scales Corporation reported revenue growth in all divisions in the first half and reiterated full-year guidance for increased underlying earnings.

The company said net profit for the six months to June 30 was $121.8 million versus $34.8 million in the same period a year earlier. The latest result includes gains on asset sales of $93.2 million.

Those divestments include the $151.4 million sale of Polarcold to Emergent Cold, which settled in May, for a gain of $73 million.  . .

Soil health field day brings sustainable solutions  to Marlborough viticulture industry :

A Soil Health Field Day, hosted by Wholesale Landscapes, will bring members of the viticulture industry together to discuss sustainable solutions for improved vineyard management.

Wholesale Landscapes has seen demand for high-quality compost and organic matter increase greatly recently, driven by Marlborough vineyard managers seeking sustainable ways to maximise grape yield, while also maintaining soil health. The Soil Health Field Day aims to provide growers with the most current information and tested solutions to specific challenges.

Soil health continues to be a critical issue for local growers, who are favoured with the terroir which produces the world-renowned Marlborough Sauvignon, with its highly-popular and distinct flavour profiles. Giving back to these unique soils is central to vineyard management, and increasingly, the broader notions of sustainability are making an impact. . .

 


Will he sue himself?

August 29, 2019

An Iwi leader is suing seven New Zealand companies for their failure to protect New Zealanders from climate change:

Climate activist and spokesperson for the Iwi Chairs Forum’s Climate Change Iwi Leaders Group, Mike Smith (Ngāpuhi, Ngāti Kahu), made the
announcement on the eve of his departure to Mexico where he will be one of the representatives for the Pacific region at an Indigenous
peoples climate forum .

Oh the irony of that. Will he also sue himself for the emissions produced by the return flights to Mexico?

Smith is alleging that the named companies have committed public nuisance, have been negligent or breached other legal duties by emitting greenhouse gases and by not doing enough to reduce those emissions in the face of scientific evidence that their emissions have caused, and will continue to cause, harm.

“Māori are particularly vulnerable to climate change, being disproportionately represented amongst the poor, who will be the hardest hit. Rising sea levels, coastal erosion, flooding and storm
surges will irrevocably damage low lying coastal communities, and warming oceans and ocean acidification will damage traditional resources, including fisheries.” . . .

The companies he’s suing are Fonterra, Genesis Energy, Dairy Holdings, New Zealand Steel, Z Energy, New Zealand Refining and BT Mining.

That some of the farmers who supply Fonterra are Maori seems to have escaped him.

If he’s worried about the impact of climate change, not only should he not be flying, he should be encouraging more dairy production here where it’s done so efficiently it’s better for the world’s second most efficient producers, the Irish, to drink our milk rather than their own, even when shipping it there is taken into account.

It’s the poor who would be hardest hit by the economic impact of reducing dairy production and the resulting export income and hit again by worsening climate change as less efficient producers increase production to fill the gap in the market that would be created if New Zealand production fell.

“The urgency of climate change means we need far greater action and we need it now, and not just from government but also across the private sector” he says.

“It’s not good enough just to set far off targets, especially ones that let our biggest polluters like the agricultural sector off the hook so they can have a bit more time to turn a profit. The fact is
we are out of time and are now looking at damage control.”

What does he mean by biggest polluter? If it’s dairy versus his flight, dairy is cleaner and if nutrient density is included in the calculation, as it ought to be if it’s to compare like with like, New Zealand milk production is a world leader.

The agricultural sector producers food that not only sustains New Zealanders but earns a significant chunk of the country’s export income.

Without that the poor he purports to worry about would be even poorer.

 


Quote of the day

August 29, 2019
As humans we look at things and think about what we’ve looked at. We treasure it in a kind of private art gallery. ― Thom Gunn who was born on this day in 1929.

August 29 in history

August 29, 2019

708 Copper coins were minted in Japan for the first time.

1350  Battle of Winchelsea (or Les Espagnols sur Mer): The English naval fleet under King Edward III defeated a Castilian fleet of 40 ships.

1475  The Treaty of Picquigny ended a brief war between France and England.

1526  Battle of Mohács: The Ottoman Turks led by Suleiman the Magnificent defeated and kill the last Jagiellonian king of Hungary and Bohemia.

1632 John Locke, English philosopher, was born (d. 1704).

1655 Warsaw fell without resistance to a small force under the command of Charles X Gustav of Sweden during The Deluge.

1758  The first American Indian Reservation was established, at Indian Mills, New Jersey.

1777  – Hyacinth, ( Nikita Yakovlevich Bichurin), Russian religious leader, founded Sinology,  was born (d. 1853).

1786  Shays’ Rebellion, an armed uprising of Massachusetts farmers, began in response to high debt and tax burdens.

1809 Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr., American physician and writer, was born (d. 1894).

1831  Michael Faraday discovered electromagnetic induction.

1833 The United Kingdom legislated the abolition of slavery in its empire.

1842 Treaty of Nanking signing ended the First Opium War.

1862 Andrew Fisher, 5th Prime Minister of Australia, was born (d. 1928).

1869  The Mount Washington Cog Railway opened, making it the world’s first rack railway.

1871  Emperor Meiji ordered the Abolition of the han system and the establishment of prefectures as local centers of administration.

1876 Charles F. Kettering, American inventor, was born (d. 1958).

1885  Gottlieb Daimler patented the world’s first motorcycle.

1898 The Goodyear tyre company was founded.

1903 The Russian battleship Slava, the last of the five Borodino-class battleships, was launched.

1907 The Quebec Bridge collapsed during construction, killing 75 workers.

1910  Japan changed Korea‘s name to Chōsen and appoints a governor-general to rule its new colony.

1911  Ishi, considered the last Native American to make contact with European Americans, emerged from the wilderness of northeastern California.

1914 New Zealand forces captured German Samoa.

NZ force captures German Samoa

1915 US Navy salvage divers raised F-4, the first U.S. submarine sunk by accident.

1915 Ingrid Bergman, Swedish actress, was born (d. 1982).

1915 Nathan Pritikin, American nutritionist, was born (d. 1985).

1918  Bapaume was taken by New Zealand forces in the Hundred Days Offensive.

1923 Richard Attenborough, English film director, was born (d. 2014).

1924 Dinah Washington, American singer, was born (d. 1963).

1929 Thom Gunn, British poet, was born (d. 2004).

1930  The last 36 remaining inhabitants of St Kilda were voluntarily evacuated to other parts of Scotland.

1943  German-occupied Denmark scuttled most of its navy;Germany dissolved the Danish government.

1944  Slovak National Uprising – 60,000 Slovak troops turned against the Nazis.

1949  Soviet atomic bomb project: The Soviet Union tested its first atomic bomb, known as First Lightning or Joe 1, at Semipalatinsk, Kazakhstan.

1958 Lenny Henry, British writer, comedian and actor, was born.

1958 Michael Jackson, American pop singer, was born (d. 2009).

1958  United States Air Force Academy opened in Colorado Springs.

1966  The Beatles performed their last concert before paying fans at Candlestick Park in San Francisco.

1970  Chicano Moratorium against the Vietnam War. Police riot killed three people, including journalist Ruben Salazar.

1982  The synthetic chemical element Meitnerium, atomic number 109, was first synthesized at the Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt, Germany.

1991 Supreme Soviet of the Soviet Union suspended all activities of the Soviet Communist Party.

1991  Libero Grassi, an Italian businessman from Palermo was killed by the Mafia after taking a solitary stand against their extortion demands.

1996  Vnukovo Airlines Flight 2801, a  Tupolev Tu-154, crashed into a mountain on the Arctic island of Spitsbergen, killing all 141 aboard.

1997  At least 98 villagers were killed by the Armed Islamic Group of Algeria GIA in the Rais massacre, Algeria.

2003 Ayatollah Sayed Mohammed Baqir al-Hakim, the Shia Muslim leader in Iraq, and nearly 100 worshippers were assassinated in a terrorist bombing, as they left a mosque in Najaf.

2005  Hurricane Katrina devastated much of the U.S. Gulf Coast from Louisiana to the Florida Panhandle, killing more than 1,836 and causing over $80 billion in damage.

2007 – 2007 United States Air Force nuclear weapons incident: six US cruise missiles armed with nuclear warheads were flown without proper authorization from Minot Air Force Base to Barksdale Air Force Bae.

2012 – The opening ceremony of the Summer Paralympic Games was held in London.

2012 – At least 26 miners were killed and 21 missing after a blast in the Xiaojiawan coal mine, located at Panzhihua in Sichuan Province, China.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


%d bloggers like this: