Rural round-up

New Zealand’s future food for thought :

Dr Jocelyn Eason, General Manager of Science and Food Innovation at Plant & Food Research, believes the future is green. And probably crunchy. But most definitely packed with nutrients.

Eason, who manages 140 scientists in the Food Innovation Portfolio at Plant & Food Research, believes the future of food lies in plants – and that New Zealand has both the scientific capability and growing expertise to be globally competitive in a plant-based food market. That means optimising plant genetics, developing future growing systems and capturing an eco-premium for new food products.

“The goal for us is to add value at each step of our food value chain. What does the market want?” That, she says, means looking at the consumption of the consumers of the future: Teenagers (GenZ). . .

Living in fear of farmageddon – Brian Fallow:

Will Farmageddon flow from the Reserve Bank’s plans to require some seismic strengthening of banks’ balance sheets?

Some of the submissions it has received in its review of bank capital requirements make sobering reading, especially about the impact on the dairy sector.

So first, some numbers. Bank lending to the agricultural sector has climbed from $12 billion in 2000 to $63b now — two-thirds of it to the dairy sector. It works out at $8300 per cow. . .

Scientists confident well-bred cows won’t burp – Michelle Dickinson:

Meat and dairy are New Zealand’s biggest earners when it comes to exports, however, they are also our largest contributor to greenhouse gas emissions. As we try to balance our economy with our commitment to the Paris climate agreement new research out this week thinks the secret to reducing climate change could be through breeding less burpy cows.

Methane emissions from ruminants including sheep and cows account for about a third of New Zealand’s greenhouse gas emissions and are by far the largest single contributor. Although methane stays in the atmosphere for less time than carbon, as a gas it is much more effective at trapping heat – acting as a blanket over our planet and playing a significant role when it comes to climate change. . .

You can’t blame Westland’s farmers for selling out – Mike O’Donnell:

Lee Iacocca died last week. One of the original rock stars of the car industry, Iacocca is credited with being the father of the Ford Mustang in 1964, considered the most iconic muscle car in automotive history.

The Mustang become immortalised in books, songs and movies – including Bullitt and Gone in 60 Seconds.

After being dumped by Ford, 15 years later Iacocca was credited as the man who saved Chrysler from going under by securing a US$1.5 billion government loan and paying it back within three years. . .

Farmers willing to pay big money for the best working dogs – Esther Taunton:

Heading dog Jack wrote himself into the history books on Thursday when he sold for a record $10,000 at an auction in Canterbury.

While it was a price fit to make townie eyes water, New Zealand Sheep Dog Trial Association president Pat Coogan said a good dog would be worth every dollar.

“The price farmers are willing to pay for a good dog has increased dramatically over the last 10 years,” he said. . .

FAST FIVE: Detroit Ririnui

Detroit Ririnui grew up in Welcome Bay in Tauranga where his family are in the kiwifruit industry but it wasn’t something he enjoyed very much. 

However, growing up in a rural environment instilled a love of the land so after a few years of working in the family business he made the decision to switch to dairying and says it was something he had always wanted to try.

He asked a relative if he knew of any dairy farm work and he told him he would give him a job in Invercargill. He made the move south where he is a farm hand on a 350-cow farm about a year ago and says he loves it.  . .

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