Word of the day

June 12, 2019

Rigwelted – of a sheep: lying on its back and unable to stand up without assistance *; cast;  confined to bed or reduced to inactivity as a result of illness or fatigue.

*There is also a beer called Rigwelter owing to the similar effect it is said to have on people.


Sowell says

June 12, 2019


Rural round-up

June 12, 2019

Dairy law changes spur dissent – Sally Rae:

Changes to dairy industry legislation will bring some improvements to the sector but also represent “a missed opportunity”, both Fonterra and Federated Farmers say.

Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor yesterday announced changes to be made to the Dairy Industry Restructuring Act 2001 (DIRA) and the Dairy Industry Restructuring Raw Milk Regulations 2012.

The changes include allowing Fonterra to refuse milk supply from new conversions and from farmers who did not comply with its supply standards. . . 

Crush protection for quad bikes very worthwhile option – Feds:

Federated Farmers is on board with WorkSafe’s decision to “strongly recommend” installation of a crush protection device (CPD) on quad bikes used for work purposes.

“We support WorkSafe’s policy clarification.  For some time Federated Farmers has been saying CPDs, or roll over protection as it used to be called, can be a very useful injury prevention option in many – but not all – farm settings,” Feds President Katie Milne says.

“There is still some debate about CPDs, including from quad bike manufacturers who say they are unsafe, and those who say the device itself can cause injury in some circumstances.  But like WorkSafe, Federated Farmers believes there is now enough evidence from credible sources to say that farmers should at least be considering Crush Protection Devices. . . 

Forest awards apprentices of the year a chip of the old block – Sally Rae:

Paige Harland was born to be in the bush.

Miss Harland (21) comes from a Southland family who have sap in their blood over three generations.

Named apprentice of the year at the recent 2019 Southern Wood Council Forestry Awards, she works for Harland Brothers Logging.

The business was established by her grandfather and great-uncle, later taken over by her uncle Peter and is now run by her cousins Jesse and Corrie Harland. . . 

Deer farmers set example:

Central Hawke’s Bay farmers Evan and Linda Potter have won the premier Elworthy Award in the deer industry’s 2019 environmental awards.

The Potters were praised by the award judges for their work in enhancing the environmental performance of their property.

They have owned the 640ha Waipapa Station for 20 years.

A bush clad gully on their Elsthorpe farm is a highly visible and attractive aspect of the Potters’ contribution. . . 

 

Decision to not front Lumsden meeting ’embarrassing’, MP says:

The Ministry of Health and Southern District Health Board decision not to meet with Southland midwives today has been described as a slap in the face.

The meeting was called to help midwives practice safely in the area after the former Lumsden Maternity Centre was downgraded.

It was cancelled after both organisations decided not to front up to midwives this afternoon.

National’s Clutha-Southland MP Hamish Walker said it was embarrassing that neither were prepared to meet with midwives for the good of the rural communities. . . 

Meet the midwives at Fieldays:

For this first time this year, midwives will have a stand at Fieldays at Mystery Creek in Hamilton.

Midwives play a vital role in the health and wellbeing of rural communities throughout New Zealand and the thousands of people who flock to the country’s premier agricultural show, will have an opportunity find out more about their work.

Out of New Zealand’s total population of 4.8 million, approximately 576,000* people live in rural areas. Around 55,000 women give birth annually in New Zealand; nearly a third of whom live in rural areas. . . 


It’s Fieldays’ week

June 12, 2019

The National Fieldays (and it is Fieldays not Field Days) officially open today.

We were there last year – met a lot of people we knew, got lots of invitations to eat and drink, only a few of which we accepted and got lots of invitations to buy, none of which we accepted.

We won’t be there this year but lots of other people are including:

and if you’re in need of some entertainment, there’s always the Rural Catch competition.


Office = wellbeing?

June 12, 2019

They were climbing Everest when both went blind  as a result of the altitude causing pressure on the eyes.

It was nearly dark.

They started descending, slowly and carefully, but one slid into a crevasse. He fell onto a shelf, managed to dig in with his ice pick to stop himself sliding off it, then slowly climbed his way out to where his climbing mate was waiting.

They continued down until they decided it would be safer to stop and wait until morning.

It was a long cold, night. At one stage one of the climbers realised he hadn’t heard a sound from the other and feared he’d given way to hypothermia.

”You okay?” he asked.

There was a pause before his mate answered.

”Yeah, I was just thinking, it could be worse, we could be working in an office.”

I was reminded of this story, which is true, when I read about a report which says there’s a divide in wellbeing between urban and rural New Zealand.

. . .On Tuesday, Infometrics released their report titled Regional Wellbeing, which looked at outcomes for Kiwis living in provincial areas compared to those in the cities.

It found wellbeing in metropolitan centres far exceeded that in the regions for seven of nine considered areas – environment, health, jobs, knowledge and skills, income, safety, and social connection.

In urban parts of the country, the report stated there was a greater mix of skilled employment opportunities, office-based work, and higher pay. . . 

Office-based work is a measure of wellbeing?

That reminds me of the quote from Vincent McNabb:

There are those who wrest a living from the land and that’s work; there are those who wrest a living from those who wrest a living from the land and that’s trade; and there are those who wrest a living from those who wrest a living from those who wrest a living from the land and that’s finance.

Farmers these days understand the need for book work, they respect the work at least some other people do in offices, but all those I know are least happy when they’re in offices and most happy when they’re outside.

Where you work in itself isn’t a measure of wellbeing. That you can work in a job you enjoy and that pays you well is a far better measure.

There are plenty of people who would be happier anywhere but an office, including, hard as it might be to believe, those two climbers who recovered their sight but lost some fingers and toes after their night out on the slopes of Everest.


Quote of the day

June 12, 2019

Saying good night to the mountains, the sun throws his most beautiful rays to them, that they may not forget him till the morning. ― Johanna Spyri who was born on this day in 1827.


June 12 in history

June 12, 2019

1381  Peasants’ Revolt: in England, rebels arrived at Blackheath.

1418  An insurrection delivered Paris to the Burgundians.

1429  Hundred Years’ War: Joan of Arc led the French army in their capture of the city and the English commander, William de la Pole, 1st Duke of Suffolk in the second day of the Battle of Jargeau.

1560  Battle of Okehazama: Oda Nobunaga defeated Imagawa Yoshimoto.

1653  First Anglo-Dutch War: the Battle of the Gabbard began.

1665 England installed a municipal government in New York City.

1758 French and Indian War: Siege of Louisbourg – James Wolfe‘s attack at Louisbourg, Nova Scotia commenced.

1775  American Revolution: British general Thomas Gage declared martial law in Massachusetts. The British offer a pardon to all colonists who lay down their arms with two exceptions: Samuel Adams and John Hancock, if captured, were to be hanged.

1776 The Virginia Declaration of Rights was adopted.

1798 Irish Rebellion of 1798: Battle of Ballynahinch.

1802 Harriet Martineau,  journalist, political economist, abolitionist and feminist, was born (d. 1876).

1806 John A. Roebling, German-America civil engineer (Brooklyn Bridge), was born (d. 1869).

1819  Charles Kingsley, English writer, was born (d. 1875).

1827 Johanna Spyri, Swiss writer, was born (d. 1901).

1830  Beginning of the French colonization of Algeria: 34,000 French soldiers landed at Sidi Ferruch.

1860  The State Bank of the Russian Empire was established.

1864 American Civil War, Overland Campaign: Battle of Cold Harbor – Ulysses S. Grant gave the Confederate forces under Robert E. Lee a victory when he pulled his Union troops from their positions at Cold Harbor, Virginia and moved south.

1889 –  78 people were killed in the Armagh rail disaster.

1897 Anthony Eden, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, was born (d. 1977).

1898 Philippine Declaration of Independence: General Emilio Aguinaldo declared the Philippines’ independence from Spain.

1899 New Richmond Tornado killed 117 people and injured around 200.

1915 David Rockefeller, American banker, was born.

1922 King George V received the colours of the six Irish regiments that were to be disbanded – the Royal Irish Regiment, the Connaught Rangers, the South Irish Horse, the Prince of Wales’s Leinster Regiment, the Royal Munster Fusiliers and the Royal Dublin Fusiliers.

1924 George H. W. Bush, 41st President of the United States, was born.

1929 Anne Frank, German-born Dutch Jewish diarist and Holocaust victim, was born (d. 1945).

1935 Chaco War ended: a truce was called between Bolivia and Paraguay.

1938 Tom Oliver, Australian actor, was born.

1939  Shooting begins on Paramount Pictures’ Dr. Cyclops, the first horror film photographed in three-strip Technicolor.

1939  The Baseball Hall of Fame opened in Cooperstown, New York.

1940  World War II: 13,000 British and French troops surrendered to Major General Erwin Rommel at Saint-Valery-en-Caux.

1942 The first troops from the USA landed in Auckland.

First US troops land in Auckland

1942  Anne Frank received a diary for her thirteenth birthday.

1943  Reg Presley, English singer/songwriter (The Troggs), was born.

1943  Germany liquidated the Jewish Ghetto in Berezhany, western Ukraine. 1,180  are lpeople were led to the city’s old Jewish graveyard and shot.

1952 Pete Farndon, English musician (The Pretenders), was born (d. 1983).

1963 Civil rights leader Medgar Evers was murdered by Ku Klux Klan member Byron De La Beckwith.

1964 Anti-apartheid activist and ANC leader Nelson Mandela was sentenced to life in prison for sabotage in South Africa.

1967  The United States Supreme Court in Loving v. Virginia declared all U.S. state laws which prohibited interracial marriage to be unconstitutional.

1967   Venera 4 was launched.

1979  Bryan Allen won the second Kremer prize for a man powered flight across the English Channel in the Gossamer Albatross.

1987  The Central African Republic‘s former Emperor Jean-Bédel Bokassa was sentenced to death for crimes he had committed during his 13-year rule.

1987  Cold War: At the Brandenburg Gate U.S. President Ronald Reagan publicly challenged Mikhail Gorbachev to tear down the Berlin Wall.

1990 Russia Day – the parliament of the Russian Federation formally declared its sovereignty.

1991  Russians elected Boris Yeltsin as the president of the republic.

1991 –  Kokkadichcholai massacre: the Sri Lankan Army massacred 152 minority Tamil civilians in the village Kokkadichcholai.

1994  Nicole Brown Simpson and Ronald Goldman were murdered outside her home in Los Angeles.

1996  In Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, a panel of federal judges blocked a law against indecency on the internet.

1997  Queen Elizabeth II reopened the Globe Theatre in London.

1999  Kosovo War: Operation Joint Guardian began when a NATO-led United Nations peacekeeping force (KFor) entered the province of Kosovo.

2000  Sandro Rosa do Nascimento took hostages while robbing Bus #174 in Rio de Janeiro.

2004  A 1.3 kilogram chondrite type meteorite struck a house in Ellerslie causing serious damage but no injuries.

2009 – A disputed presidential election in Iran leads to wide ranging protests in Iran and around the world.

2016  – 49 civilians were killed and 53 others injured in an attack on a gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida. The gunman, Omar Mateen, was killed in a gunfight with police.

2017 – American student Otto Warmbier returned home in a coma after spending 17 months in a North Korean prison and died a week later.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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