Word of the day

June 10, 2019

Flaperon – a hinged surface on the trailing edge of an aircraft wing, used to control both roll about the longitudinal axis and lift; a control surface functioning both as a flap and as an aileron.


Sowell says

June 10, 2019


Rural round-up

June 10, 2019

Tell your story don’t dump data – Annette Scott:

Farm environment plans, while not yet mandatory, offer a unique opportunity for the high country, AgFirst environmental consultant Erica van Reenen says.

Talking to the high country farmers’ conference in Blenheim van Reenen acknowledged they are challenged with climate and market vulnerability.

They are also challenged to get up with the game and communicate in the same space as their urban counterparts.

That means telling their farming stories where urban people tell their stories – in social media circles.   . . 

Adrian and Pauline Ball of Dennley Farms from Waikato Announced as new National Ambassadors for Sustainable Farming and Growing:

Adrian and Pauline Ball, owners and operators of Dennley Farms Ltd, are the new National Ambassadors for Sustainable Farming and Growing and the recipients of the Gordon Stephenson Trophy.

The announcement was made at tonight’s Ballance Farm Environment Awards National Sustainability Showcase at Claudelands in Hamilton. The Ballance Farm Environment Awards celebrate and promote sustainable farming and growing practices.

Dennley Farms’ strong environmental, social and economic sustainability was a stand-out for the National Judging Panel. The business’ tagline is ‘creating value inside the farm gate,’ and the farm team is active in the creation of meaningful industry change and driven to improve consumer perception of the sector. . .

Grass-fed message won’t sell NZ products but health benefits could – Esther Taunton:

New Zealand’s “clean, green, grass-fed” message isn’t unique and exporters should instead focus on the nutritional benefits of their food products, Andy Elliot says.

Elliot spent much of last year studying the business models of New Zealand producers and exporters as part of the Nuffield agricultural scholarship programme.

He says that in order to get more value from existing production, the country needs to find a way to stand out in the increasingly competitive global market. . . 

Wool bonanza – Annette Scott:

Increased international demand for fine wool is putting Kiwi wool within reach of becoming a $2 billion industry.

New Zealand Merino Company chief executive John Brakenridge said if half NZ’s crossbred wool clip shifts into higher-value fine wool contracts the economic upside will be as high as $2b.

Increased international demand for fine wool could spell profit for sheep farmers with wool giving kiwifruit and wine a real run for their money in terms of exports, he said.

There is a future in wool for farmers and for NZ, he said.

“Which is great news for fine wool producers and farmers considering transitioning into it.” . . 

NZ grower the first to use compostable stickers on its apples :

A Hawke’s Bay apple grower says it is the first in the Southern Hemisphere to use compostable stickers on its apples.

The organic apple grower, Bostock New Zealand, planned to roll out more compostable stickers next year after a successful trial.

The new sticker meets regulations for direct food contact and breaks down when put in an industrial compost, according to the company’s organic supply manager Heidi Stiefel.

Ms Stiefel said they supplied apples labelled with those stickers to a European customer and some New Zealand supermarkets this year. . . 

Carbon neutral livestock production — consumers want it and farmers say it is achievable – Angus Verley, Aneeta Bhole, Tyne Logan and Lydia Burton:

Meat and Livestock Australia (MLA) believes a zero carbon footprint nationally — considered by some the holy grail for the red meat industry — is possible by 2030.

It is a target that has the backing of some of the industry’s leading farmers, and the demand for projects is on the rise.

Climate Friendly, a carbon farming project developer, said the policy was a “hotbed of action”. . . 


Quote of the day

June 10, 2019

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep. Saul Bellow who was born on this day in 1915.


Reject blanket afforestation of farmland

June 10, 2019

Government policy which subsidises forestry is a bigger threat to food production, rural communities and the New Zealand economy than the ag-sag of the 1980s.

North Otago was particularly hard-hit by the stripping of subsidies that coincided with high interest rates and soaring inflation.

Many farms were too small to be economic and the district was plagued by recurring droughts.

Predictions that farmers would be driven off the land in great numbers proved to be an exaggeration. But many jobs on farm and in businesses that serviced and supplied them were lost and very few of the farmers’ adult children who left the district for education or work returned.

Farmers gradually adjusted to life without subsidies and are stronger for it. Inflation and interest rates returned to manageable levels, irrigation provided protection from droughts and created jobs on and off farm.

There will be no recovery and resurgence of rural communities when productive farmland is replaced by forests.

Subsidising forestry and making it easier for foreign buyers to buy land for forestry than farming is already killing on-farm jobs.

50 Shades of Green paints the local picture:

  • 100,000 stock units sold to forestry in the Wairarapa these last twelve months
  • Economic impact on Wairarapa community? Direct spend at $125/stock unit: $12.5m. Plus four times multiplier effect.
  • — 1,000 hectares sheep/beef farm creates seven jobs.
  • 1,000 hectares plantation forestry creates one job.
  • Tree planting by temporary immigrants… most of the wages are sent home.
  • — Rural communities will be decimated.
  • — Farm land prices have been pushed up by these taxpayer
    subsidies
    .

It’s not just in the Wairarapa and it’s not just farming jobs that are lost. Fewer people on farms means fewer children in schools, fewer people buying locally and fewer work opportunities servicing and supplying farms and farmers.

It  means less food produced for the local market and export and less export income.

It is also counter to the Paris Climate Accord which states that climate mitigation should not be at the expense of food production.

This is the motivation for the petition asking that legislation which incentivises the blanket afforestation of farmland be rejected:

. . .There has never been such an imminent threat to food production in New Zealand as that which looms over us in the form of current government policies which align across multiple government portfolios designed to meet specific policy agendas.  These agendas combined, create a massive assault on the viability of rural businesses, on sustainable land use, on infrastructure and ultimately on the lives of those living the experience of this assault.

We need your support as we fight to provide a voice for the industries and communities rendered defenceless in the face of ill-conceived afforestation incentives which are already leading to unemployment, displacement and declining standards of living for those left behind.

The tension between competing land uses has long existed between forestry and pastoral farming; however never before has a government provided the mechanisms for one to obliterate the other to the extent that this potential now exists.

It is this case that we ask your support in defending.

Not that forestry should be maligned, but that the Government of today and Governments going forward must be made to see that crippling small towns through distorted market incentives is morally wrong, economically foolish and will impact vulnerable individuals and communities for generations to come.

It’s not just morally wrong and economically foolish, it’s socially destructive, it’s not backed up by science and will do more harm than good to the environment.

The government ignored advice from Environment Commissioner Simon Upton who said the science shows trees could off-set methane emissions but would not offset fossil fuel emissions.

If New Zealand produces less food, it will be replaced by meat and milk from other countries whose farmers are far less efficient than ours.

We have already picked up the torch of environmental restoration and we willingly carry it as the legacy we leave for those who come after us; in this we are already united, but a crippled community can restore nothing, and an empty community will not care.

We ask you to join your name to our petition and stand alongside us as we defend our common right to live and work on the land, growing food for our country sustainably, ethically and for the benefit of all New Zealand. 

Some areas should never have been cleared and should be replanted in trees.

But there is no economic, environmental or scientific justification for turning productive farmland into forests.

 

 


June 10 in history

June 10, 2019

1190  Third Crusade:  Frederick I Barbarossa drowned in the river Saleph while leading an army to Jerusalem.

1539 Council of Trent: Paul III sent out letters to his bishops, delaying the Council due to war and the difficulty bishops had travelling to Venice.

1619 Thirty Years’ War: Battle of Záblatí, a turning point in the Bohemian Revolt.

1624 Treaty of Compiègne, signed between France and the Netherlands.

1688  Prince of Wales, James Francis Edward Stuart, was born (d. 1766).

1692 Salem witch trials: Bridget Bishop was hanged at Gallows Hill  for “certaine Detestable Arts called Witchcraft & Sorceries”.

1710 James Short, Scottish mathematician, optician and telescope maker was born  (d. 1768).

1719 Jacobite Rising: Battle of Glen Shiel.

1770  Captain James Cook ran aground on the Great Barrier Reef.

1786  A landslide dam on the Dadu River created by an earthquake ten days earlier collapses, killing 100,000 in the Sichuan province of China.

1793  The Jardin des Plantes museum opened in Paris.

1793 – French Revolution: Following the arrests of Girondin leaders the Jacobins gained control of the Committee of Public Safety installing the revolutionary dictatorship.

1805  First Barbary War: Yussif Karamanli signed a treaty ending hostilities with the United States.

1829 The first Boat Race between the University of Oxford and the University of Cambridge took place.

1838   – Myall Creek massacre: Twenty-eight Aboriginal Australians were murdered..

1854  The first class of the United States Naval Academy students graduated.

1864  American Civil War: Battle of Brice’s Crossroads – Confederate troops under Nathan Bedford Forrest defeated a much larger Union force led by General Samuel D. Sturgis.

1871 – Sinmiyangyo: Captain McLane Tilton led 109 US Marines in a naval attack on Han River forts on Kanghwa Island, Korea.

1886  Mount Tarawera erupted, killing 153 people and destroying the famous Pink and White Terraces.

 

Eruption of Mt Tarawera

1889 – The first New Zealand kindergarten  opened in Dunedin.

1898 – Spanish–American War: U.S. Marines land on the island of Cuba.

1901 Frederick Loewe, Austrian-born composer, was born  (d. 1988).

1906 Liberal Prime Minister Richard Seddon died at sea while returning from Australia to what he called “God’s Own Country”.

Death of Richard Seddon

1910 Robert Still, English composer, was born  (d. 1971).

1915 Saul Bellow, Canadian born writer and Nobel laureate was born (d. 2005).

1918 The Austro-Hungarian battleship SMS Szent István sank after being torpedoed by an Italian MAS motorboat.

1921 Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, was born.

1922 Judy Garland, American musical actress, was born (d. 1969).

1923 Robert Maxwell, Slovakian-born newspaperman was born  (d. 1991).

1924 Fascists kidnapped and killed Italian socialist leader Giacomo Matteotti.

1925 Inaugural service for the United Church of Canada, a union of Presbyterian, Methodist, and Congregationalist churches, held in Toronto Arena.

1935  Dr. Robert Smith took his last drink, and Alcoholics Anonymous was founded by him and Bill Wilson.

1940 Augie Auer, US born New Zealand meteorologist and television presenter, was born  (d. 2007).

1940 World War II: Italy declared war on France and the United Kingdom.

1940 – World War II: U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt denounced Italy’s actions with his “Stab in the Back” speech at the graduation ceremonies of the University of Virginia.

1940 – World War II: German forces, under General Erwin Rommel, reached the English Channel.

1940 – World War II: Military resistance to the German occupation of Norway ended.

1942  World War II: Nazis burnt the Czech village of Lidice in reprisal for the killing of Reinhard Heydrich.

1944 World War II: 642 men, women and children were killed in the Oradour-sur-Glane Massacre in France.

1944 – World War II: In Distomo, Boeotia Prefecture, Greece 218 men, women and children were massacred by German troops.

1945  Australian Imperial Forces landed in Brunei Bay to liberate Brunei.

1947 Saab produced its first car.

1957 John Diefenbaker led the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada to a stunning upset in the Canadian federal election, 1957, ending 22 years of Liberal Party rule.

1965 – Susanne Albers, German computer scientist and academic, was born.

1967 –  Six-Day War ended  Israel and Syria agreed to a cease-fire.

1973 John Paul Getty III was kidnapped in Rome.

1977 – Apple shipped its first Apple II personal computer.

1980 The African National Congress published a call to fight from their imprisoned leader Nelson Mandela.

1996  Peace talks began in Northern Ireland without the participation of Sinn Féin.

1997 Khmer Rouge leader Pol Pot ordered the killing of his defence chief Son Sen and 11 of Sen’s family members.

1999  Kosovo War: NATO suspended its air strikes after Slobodan Milošević agreed to withdraw Serbian forces from Kosovo.

2001  Pope John Paul II canonized Lebanon s first female saint Saint Rafqa.

2002  The first direct electronic communication experiment between the nervous systems of two humans was carried out by Kevin Warwick in the United Kingdom.

2003  The Spirit Rover was launched, beginning NASA’s Mars Exploration Rover mission.

2003 – Wicked opened on Broadway, and subsequently won 40 awards for the Broadway production.

2016 – Former The Voice contestant Christina Grimmie was fatally shot in Orlando, Florida following a concert; she died from her injuries at the age of 22.

2017 – The 2017 World Expo was opened in Astana, Kazakhstan.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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