Word of the day

May 11, 2019

Syrinx – the lower larynx or voice organ in birds, situated at or near the junction of the trachea and bronchi and well developed in songbirds.


Thatcher thinks

May 11, 2019


Breaking moos

May 11, 2019

Borrowed from Proud to be a Farmer:


Rural round-up

May 11, 2019

Forget the avengers, farmers are the real heroes – Nigel Malthus:

Farmers are the world’s real superheroes, says Rabobank executive Marc Oostdijk.

Launching Rabobank’s recent FoodX programme, which aims to introduce high school students to career paths in the food industry, Oostdijk says world population is expected to reach 9 or 10 billion by 2050.

“That’s massive, and to grow food and fibres for them is a massive challenge.” . . 

Mental health help ‘there if you ask’ – farmer who faced Mycoplasma bovis cull for months:

A Southland farmer whose farm suffered through a cull because of Mycoplasma bovis says emotional support is available for those who need it – especially farmers, who might be scared to ask for help. 

It comes as two senior rural support workers, hired to help farmers cope with losing their stock, quit over what they say has been a poor response by the Ministry of Primary Industries (MPI).

Southland farmer Ben Walling told First Up he was forced to cull 1700 calves after his farm became infected. . .

Health bus nearly ready to roll – Yvonne O’Hara:

The new Women’s Health Bus (Te Waka Wahine Hauora) is expected to arrive in the Otago and Southland region next month, service co-founder Dr Helen Paterson, of Dunedin, says.

The non-profit mobile health service has been in the planning stages for about two years, but last year obstetrician and gynaecologist Dr Paterson and Junction Health practice co-owner and practice nurse Alice van Zijl, of Cromwell, ordered the purpose-built vehicle from a specialist Whangaparaoa building firm.

Dr Paterson said the health bus would provide women’s health services, including cervical screening and contraception, to women in Otago and Southland’s rural and isolated communities. . .

Frame & Macey: Two-basket approach no free ride for farmers – Dave Frame & Adrian Macey:

A two-basket approach to climate policy is perfectly sensible and would be anything but a free ride to farmers. Recent assertions to the contrary by Jim Salinger and Raymond Desjardins suggest they may have misunderstood both the recent climate science and the policy logic that has led both the Productivity Commission and the Parliamentary Commissioner for the Environment to recommend two-basket approaches.

The first and simplest point to note is that the world has actually used a multi-basket approach to climate policy before. The Montreal Protocol worked pretty well – on some estimates it was more successful at lowering greenhouse gas emissions than the Kyoto Protocol. Montreal was based on a multi-basket approach. There’s nothing inherently better about a one-basket approach to policy, and the reverse is probably true if the residence times of different pollutants span a large range. . .

In a remote South Island valley, birdsong returns – David Williams:

Twenty-one years of intensive pest control in the Landsborough Valley is paying off. David Williams reports.

Colin O’Donnell ambles towards the edge of silver beech forest near the Landsborough River, drawn by the high-pitched, repetitive call of a mohua. It’s a call the Department of Conservation ecologist has been following for more than 30 years.

Ford Flat, overlooked by the Solution Range of mountains, is a common place to wait for the river to recede. In sections of the forest above there’s an ominous ripple of red – signs of a coming mast seeding. Swirling sandflies are ever-present and insistent.

“While it’s there I might just cheat,” O’Donnell says of the chattering mohua, producing from his pocket a portable speaker loaded with bird calls. “It might not work but we’ll give it a go.” . .

Special occasion for fans of hunt – Sally Rae:

He might be ”just a little” over 80 but evergreen Central Otago Hunt master Glynne Smith is showing no signs of slowing down.

Yesterday, Mr Smith was galloping across farmland near Moa Creek, in the Ida Valley, filling the position he has held for the past 30 years.

As master, he was ultimately responsible for the running of the hunt day, and yesterday’s was particularly special for him.

It was the first hunt in Central Otago Hunt’s 30th anniversary programme, which includes four hunts, the South Island hound show and several social functions. . .


Ten Five

May 11, 2019

Police have announced a new number to call for non-emergencies:

At 10:05 am on the 10th of the 5th, New Zealand Police is launching 105 (“ten five”), the eagerly anticipated number for the public to report non-emergency situations to Police.

“More than 60 years on from the first 111 call, the launch of 105 today is a milestone for New Zealand Police, offering a new way for people to connect with us,” says Commissioner of Police Mike Bush.

“The 105 number and our online platform – 105.police.govt.nz – will make it easier for the public to engage with us for non-emergency help, advice and support.”

105 is a national non-emergency number that will be answered 24/7 by highly trained Police staff.

It is free to call from all landline and mobile numbers.

“Introducing 105 is part of our drive to modernise the way we deliver services to the public and ensure everyone in New Zealand can access policing services – anywhere, anytime,” says Commissioner Bush.

“We want people to use 105 to report non-emergency situations.

For example, if your car has been stolen, your property has been damaged, or you want to give Police information about crime in your area; use 105.

“111, on the other hand, should still be called immediately if a crime is taking place or there’s a threat to life or property.

It’s the number you use to connect with Police, Fire and Emergency, and the ambulance services.”

As well as by phone, people can go online to the 105 website to report certain non-emergency situations, and get updates on or add more information to their existing reports.

Currently, lost property, intentional property damage, shoplifting, general theft, and theft from a car can be reported at 105.police.govt.nz.

“We’re encouraging people to report non-emergencies online when and if they can,” says Commissioner Bush.

A public education and marketing campaign will ensure all New Zealanders are aware of the 105 number.

The public education campaign kicks off today and uses posters, brochures, and social media to help inform all New Zealanders about the number and when and how to use it.

Commissioner Bush says Police has planned for an increase in non-emergency calls with the introduction of 105.

“We’ll launch our marketing campaign – including a jingle designed to guarantee 105 is a number you’ll never forget – once we are sure we understand the demand which has been generated from the public education campaign.”

Further information about 105 and promotional material is available online at 105.police.govt.nz.

People used the emergency, 111, number for more than a million non-emergencies in the past year:

* A caller had run out of smokes and wanted someone to bring him some more.

* A caller’s hair colour was not the same on the packet and she wanted a refund.

* A caller wanted someone to come clean up her husband’s vomit, because she didn’t like the smell.

* A caller couldn’t turn off the TV (police suggested unplugging it). . . .

Whether people who call the emergency number for these non-emergencies will have the sense to call the new non-emergency number will remain to be seen.

But any reduction in calls which unnecessarily tie up the emergency line will be an improvement.

But why 105?

Ten five used to be police code for out of service for a short time but is now obsolete.


Saturday soapbox

May 11, 2019

Saturday’s soapbox is yours to use as you will – within the bounds of decency and absence of defamation. You’re welcome to look back or forward, discuss issues of the moment, to pontificate, ponder or point us to something of interest, to educate, elucidate or entertain, amuse, bemuse or simply muse, but not abuse.

Image result for ayaan hirsi ali quotes

In the real world, equal respect for all cultures doesn’t translate into a rich mosaic of colourful and proud peoples interacting peacefully while maintaining a delightful diversity of food and craftwork. It translates into closed pockets of oppression, ignorance and abuse. –  Ayaan Hirsi Ali


May 11 in history

May 11, 2019

330 Byzantium was renamed Nova Roma during a dedication ceremony, but was more popularly referred to as Constantinople.

1310 In France, fifty-four members of the Knights Templar were burned at the stake as heretics.

1647 Peter Stuyvesant arrived in New Amsterdam to replace Willem Kieft as Director-General of New Netherland, the Dutch colonial settlement in present-day New York City.

1745 War of Austrian Succession: Battle of Fontenoy –French forces defeated an AngloDutch-Hanoverian army.

1792 Captain Robert Gray became the first documented European to sail into the Columbia River.

1799– John Lowell, Jr., American businessman and philanthropist, founded Lowell Institute (d. 1836) was born (d. 1836).

1812 Prime Minister Spencer Perceval was assassinated by John Bellingham in the lobby of the House of Commons.

1813 William LawsonGregory Blaxland and William Wentworth led an expedition westwards from Sydney. Their route opened up inland Australia for continued expansion throughout the 19th century.

1820 Launch of HMS Beagle, the ship that took Charles Darwin on his scientific voyage.

1838 – Isabelle Bogelot, French philanthropist was born (d. 1923).

1852 Charles W. Fairbanks, 26th United States Vice President was born (d. 1918).

1857 – Indian Rebellion of 1857: Indian rebels seized Delhi from the British..

1862 American Civil War: The ironclad CSS Virginia was scuttled in the James River.

1867 Luxembourg gained its independence.

1875  Harriet Quimby, American aviator, was born (d. 1912).

1888 Irving Berlin, American composer, was born (d. 1989).

1891 The Ōtsu Incident : Tsarevich Nicholas Alexandrovich of Imperial Russia (Nicholas II) was critically injured by the sword attack by a Japanese policeman Tsuda Sanzō.

1892  Margaret Rutherford, English actress, was born (d. 1972).

1894 Pullman Strike: Four thousand Pullman Palace Car Company workers went on a wildcat strike in Illinois.

1904 Salvador Dalí, Spanish painter was born (d. 1989).

1907 – Rose Ausländer, Ukrainian-English poet and author, was born (d. 1988).

1907 A derailment outside Lompoc, California killed 32 Shriners when their chartered train derails at a switch near Surf Depot.

1910 An act of the U.S. Congress establishes Glacier National Park in Montana.

1918 The Mountainous Republic of the Northern Caucasus was officially established.

1924 Mercedes-Benz was formed by Gottlieb Daimler and Karl Benz merging their two companies.

1927 The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences was founded.

1938 – Johnny Devlin, New Zealand-Australian singer-songwriter, was born.

1942  William Faulkner’s collections of short stories, Go Down, Moses, was published.

1943  World War II: American troops invaded Attu Island.

1943 – Nancy Greene, Canadian skier and politician, was born.

1944 World War II: The Allies started a major offensive against the Axis Powers on the Gustav Line.

1944 – John Benaud, Australian cricketer, was born.

1945 Captain Charles Upham was presented with the VC and Bar.

Upham presented with VC and Bar

1945  World War II: The aircraft carrier USS Bunker Hill, was hit by two kamikazes, killing 346 of her crew.

1946 UMNO (United Malays National Organisation) was created.

1949  Siam officially changed its name to Thailand for the second time.

1950 – Jeremy Paxman, English journalist and author, was born.

1953  The 1953 Waco tornado outbreak: An F5 tornado hit downtown Waco, Texas, killing 114.

1960 In Buenos Aires four Israeli Mossad agents captured fugitive Nazi Adolf Eichmann, living under the assumed name Ricardo Klement.

1960 – The first contraceptive pill was made available on the market.

1967 – Andreas Papandreou, Greek economist and socialist politician, was imprisoned in Athens by the Greek military junta.

1970 The Lubbock Tornado a F5 tornado hits Lubbock, Texas, killing 26 and causing $250 million in damage.

1984 A transit of Earth from Mars took place.

1985  Fifty-six spectators died when a flash fire struck the Valley Parade football ground during a match in Bradford, England.

1987  Klaus Barbie went on trial in Lyon for war crimes committed during World War II.

1987 The first heart-lung transplant took place, performed by Dr. Bruce Reitz, of Stanford University School of Medicine.

1995 More than 170 countries decide to extend the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty indefinitely and without conditions.

1996  A fire started by improperly handled oxygen canisters in the cargo hold of Atlanta-bound ValuJet Flight 592 caused the Douglas DC-9 to crash in the Florida Everglades killing all 110 on board.

1997 IBM Deep Blue, a chess-playing supercomputer, defeated Garry Kasparov in the last game of the rematch, becoming the first computer to beat a world-champion chess player in a classic match format.

1998 India conducted three underground nuclear tests in Pokhran, including a thermonuclear device.

2000 Effective date of Canada’s first modern-day treaty – The Nisga’a Final Agreement.

2000 – Second Chechen War: Chechen separatists ambushed Russian paramilitary forces in the Republic of Ingushetia.

2010 – David Cameron became Prime Minister of the United Kingdom following talks between the Conservatives and Liberal Democrats to form the UK’s first coalition government since World War 2 after elections produced a hung parliament.

2013 – At least 46 people were killed by a pair of car bombs in Reyhanlı, Turkey.

2014 – 15 people were killed and 46 injured in Kinshasa in a stampede caused by tear gas being thrown into the stand by police officers attempting to defuse a hostile incident.

2016 – More than 110 people were killed in an ISIL bombing in Baghdad.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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