Word of the day

March 13, 2019

Manducable –  capable of being chewed; soft enough to chew; edible.


Sowell says

March 13, 2019


Rural round-up

March 13, 2019

Tax recommendations threaten future prosperity:

Federated Farmers is calling on the Government to reject the majority of the raft of new taxes proposed by the Tax Working Group.

“Small business would pay the costs, large business would spend thousands avoiding the costs and tax advisors and valuers would have a field day,” Federated Farmers Vice-President Andrew Hoggard says.

“There is possibly an argument for a Capital Gains Tax aimed at rental properties if there was some sound evidence it would dampen investor speculation, and reduce price pressure and first home buyers being out-bid. But even with that, we haven’t given the tougher ‘bright line’ test rules a chance to really kick in. . .

Despite rising prices farmers are feeling oppressed from all sides and confidence is low. FIckle urban voters are driving a flood of rules and imposing costs that make little sense to the business of farming – Guy Trafford:

The results of the January Federated Farmers farmer survey have recently been published and makes fairly sober reading – especially in the context that prices for most commodities are reasonably sound.

Only 5.1% of respondents expected economic conditions to improve and but nearly 46% expect economic conditions to worsen, this is the worse result since July 2009.

Given the recent rises in milk prices and solid returns coming for sheep and beef farmers this level of pessimism is somewhat surprising and perhaps is a reflection of where farmers heads are at rather than a measure of what the ‘true’ economic conditions are. . . 

Looking to Generation Z for the future of  food – Sarah Perriam:

The rural sector is rapidly changing.

Consumer demand and global trends means New Zealand farmers need to embrace innovation to be able to compete and thrive in this new and exciting environment.

The next generation is vital for success. . . 

Greenpeace billboard ruled misleading  :

Federated Farmers is pleased the Advertising Standards Authority has ruled that a Greenpeace billboard aimed at fertilizer companies and the dairy industry is misleading and takes advocacy a step too far.

“Federated Farmers believes everyone has the right to express strong views but as the ASA Complaints Board ruling underlines, over-simplification of issues and targeting of two farmer-owned companies is misleading and overly provocative,” Feds environment spokesperson Chris Allen says. . .

Zespri. Appoints Bruce Cameron as chairman – Luke Chivers:

While the kiwifruit industry is having its day in the sun it is not short of challenges. Luke Chivers spoke to new Zespri chairman Bruce Cameron about the future.

New Zespri chairman Bruce Cameron is taking over at a time of strong continuity and volume in kiwifruit exports.

He replaces Te Puna grower Peter McBride who has stood down to pursue other primary industry interests, including a Fonterra directorship. . .

Butter prices go into meltdown :

Butter prices fell 10 percent in February 2019 to a 19-month low, Stats NZ said today.

The average price for a 500g block of butter fell to $5.20 in February 2019, down from a record high of $5.79 in January 2019.

“In January we saw milk prices fall to a 19-month low. This price fall now looks to be flowing on to other dairy products,” consumer prices manager Gael Price said. . . 


Learn lesson from Colorado

March 13, 2019

Ben Cort, an anti-cannabis campaigner has warned New Zealand against legalizing recreational cannabis  after seeing the effects of the drug in his home state of Colorado:

Marijuana was legalised for recreational use in Colorado in 2012, meaning anyone 21 years or older can use, carry and grow the drug there. . .

“I spent five years at the University of Colorado hospital when we legalised and we went from seeing paranoia associated with it every now and again to multiple times in a day.”

He said legalisation brings with it forms of the drug that have much higher THC levels.

“People don’t understand that we’re not talking about a joint.

“People are smoking vapourisers that come in the form of functional pens that you can write and then hit… it’s not weed, it’s a concentrate. An 80 percent THC concentrate.” . . .

Legalisation has led to the commercialisation of THC which is far, far stronger than the cannabis of old.

It is an addictive substance. The stronger and more accessible the product is, the greater the problems associated with it.

He said legalisation hasn’t stopped people from using the drug dangerously.

“The driving under the influence, the working under the influence – it has changed my home.” . . .

We already have a problem with people driving under the influence of legal and illegal drugs and with people unable to work safely because they are drug impaired.

”You need to understand that we are not talking about the plant, the drug that people consumed in years past. It has fundamentally changed and that genie can’t go back in the bottle.”

“We have changed from a plant with two-to-three percent THC in it, to something that is 90-plus percent THC, put into sodas, water, gummy bears, tea, coffee, it is not the same drug.” . . .

New Zealand can learn the lesson from Colorado.

Suzy Ferguson interviewed Cort here.


Quote of the day

March 13, 2019

Politics, the crooked timber of our communal lives, dominates everything, because, in the end, everything — high and low and, most especially, high — lives or dies by politics. You can have the most advanced and efflorescent of cultures. Get your politics wrong, however, and everything stands to be swept away. This is not ancient history. This is Germany 1933. – Charles Krauthammer who was born on this day in 1950.


March 13 in history

March 13, 2019

1138 Cardinal Gregorio Conti was elected Antipope as Victor IV.

1639  Harvard College was named for clergyman John Harvard.

1764 Earl Grey, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, was born  (d. 1845).

1781  William Herschel discovered Uranus.

1809  Gustav IV Adolf of Sweden was deposed in a coup d’état.

1845  Felix Mendelssohn‘s Violin Concerto received its première performance in Leipzig with Ferdinand David as soloist.

1862  The U.S. federal government forbade all Union army officers from returning fugitive slaves, thus effectively annulling the Fugitive Slave Law of 1850 and setting the stage for the Emancipation Proclamation.

1881 Alexander II of Russia was killed when a bomb was thrown at him.

1884 Sir Hugh Walpole, New Zealand-English novelist, was born (d. 1941).

1884 The Siege of Khartoum, Sudan began.

1897 San Diego State University was founded.

1900 –  Second Boer War: British forces occupied Bloemfontein, Orange Free State.

1900 The length of the workday for women and children is limited by law to 11 hours in France.

1920 The Kapp Putsch briefly ousted the Weimar Republic government from Berlin.

1921 Mongolia, under Baron Roman Ungern von Sternberg, declared its independence from China.

1925 Scopes Trial: A law in Tennessee banned the teaching of evolution.

1926 – Carlos Roberto Reina, Honduran lawyer and politician, President of Honduras, was born (d. 2003).

1929 – Zbigniew Messner, Polish economist and politician, 9th Prime Minister of the Republic of Poland, was born (d. 2014).

1930 The news of the discovery of Pluto was telegraphed to the Harvard College Observatory.

1933 Banks in the U.S. began to re-open after President Franklin D. Roosevelt mandated a “bank holiday“.

1935 – David Nobbs, English author and screenwriter, was born (d. 2015).

1938  – Erma Franklin, American singer, was born (d. 2002).

1939  Neil Sedaka, American singer and songwriter, was born.

1943 German forces destroyed the Jewish ghetto in Kraków.

1949 – Dame Sian Elias, New Zealand lawyer and politician, 12th Chief Justice of New Zealand, was born.

1950 – Charles Krauthammer American physician, journalist, and author was born (d. 2018).

1954  – Valerie Amos, Baroness Amos, Guyanese-English politician, Secretary of State for International Development, was born.

1954  Battle of Điện Biên Phủ: Viet Minh forces attacked the French.

1956 – New Zealand won its first cricket test – playing against the West Indies at Eden Park.

NZ's first test cricket victory

1957 Cuban student revolutionaries stormed the presidential palace in Havana  in a failed attempt on the life of President Fulgencio Batista.

1960  Adam Clayton, Irish bassist (U2), was born.

1969  Apollo 9 returned safely to Earth after testing the Lunar Module.

1979 The New Jewel Movement, headed by Maurice Bishop, ousted Prime Minister Eric Gairy in a nearly bloodless coup d’etat in Grenada.

1986 Microsoft had its initial public offering.

1989 A geomagnetic storm caused the collapse of the Hydro-Québecpower grid.

1991 The United States Department of Justice announced that Exxon had agreed to pay $1 billion for the clean-up of the Exxon Valdez oil spill in Alaska.

1992 An earthquake registering 6.8 on the Richter scale killed  more than 500 in Erzincan, eastern Turkey.

1995 – The world’s first Laughter Club was launched by Dr Madan Kataria, in Mumbai.

1996 Dunblane massacre: 16 children and 1 teacher were shot dead by Thomas Watt Hamilton who then committed suicide.

1997 India’s Missionaries of Charity chose  Sister Nirmala to succeed Mother Teresa as its leader.

1997 The Phoenix lights were seen over Phoenix, Arizona by hundreds of people, and by millions on television.

2003 The journal Nature reported that 350,000-year-old footprints of an upright-walking human had been found in Italy.

2005 Terry Ratzmann shot and killed six members of the Living Church of God and the minister before killing himself.

2008 Gold prices on the New York Mercantile Exchange hit $1,000 per ounce for the first time.

2013 – Pope Francis was elected in the papal conclave to succeed Pope Benedict XVI.

2016 – An explosion in central Ankara, Turkey, killed at least 37 people and left 127 wounded.

2016 – Three gunmen attacked two hotels in the Ivory Coast town of Grand-Bassam, killing at least 18 people and injuring 33 others.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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