Word of the day

February 26, 2019

Testaceous – of a dull, brick-red colour; having a hard outer shell; of relating to or derived from shells.


Sowell says

February 26, 2019


Rural round-up

February 26, 2019

Tough choice – houses or food :

With almost half of New Zealand’s land area committed to pasture and crops it would be easy to think that despite our growing population there is still plenty of land to spare.

Land Squeeze Dinkus 1But in the past two decades some of the country’s highest quality land has gone under cement and tarmac for urban development. Despite having a population the size of Melbourne in a land area the size of Britain some people are starting to question whether a country that earns its living off its soils can afford to keep paving over its key resource to support population growth. 

The loss of productive soils to housing is a subject economist Shamubeel Eaqub has given considerable thought.  . . 

Bulls, ewes and tepees, a rare mix– Luke Chivers:

Sheep and beef farmers James and Sarah Glenn are fuelling the intergenerational Sheep and beef farmers James and Sarah Glenn are fuelling the intergenerational transfer of their farming business with a rare mix of bulls, sheep and tepees. Luke Chivers reports. 

On a coastal slice of rural New Zealand a young couple are combining their passion for family with farming and tepees.

Te Akau sheep and beef farmers James and Sarah Glenn have a longstanding connection with the primary sector. 

Farming dominated their teenage years. . . 

Otago woman developing fine eye for stock :

Otago woman Elizabeth Graham (21) has won a national stock judging competition in Christchurch.

She is a member of the Strath Taieri Young Farmers Club, and while at the New Zealand Young Farmers Conference in Christchurch earlier this month, won the stock judging competition.

The competition attracted the young farmers teams from throughout the country.

”It was a huge honour to take out the overall title,” she said.

”This year’s competition included alpacas, which made things a little interesting.” . .

The highs and lows of running an organic orchard

The recipient of New Zealand’s top sustainable farming award says she’d like to see more kiwifruit orchardists provide full-time employment for their staff.

Organic kiwifruit grower Catriona White and her husband Mark are the first horticulturists to win the Gordon Stephenson trophy, which is awarded to one of the 11 regional winners in the annual Farm Environment Awards.

Catriona says she and Mark pay two staff on their Opotiki orchard for a 40-hour week regardless of whether the weather allows them to work the hours or not.

“You look after your staff and your staff look after you.” . . 

Feds calls for regulation of stock agents:

The Federated Farmers Meat & Wool Council is calling for compulsory regulation of the stock agent industry.

“No-one likes more rules and regulation but to protect all parties in the sale of livestock we believe it is the best way forward,” Feds’ Meat & Wool chairperson Miles Anderson says.

“Discussions about this topic have run hot and cold for years.  We need some finality.”

The NZ Stock and Station Agents Association has created a code of conduct and set up an independent body that can adjudicate on complaints about the actions of stock agents. . . 

Cows get own Tinder-style app for breeding – Aine Quinn:

Cows and bulls searching for “moo love” now have a mobile app to help their breeders.

A U.K. farming startup introduced a Tinder-style app, called Tudder, that lets farmers find breeding matches by viewing pictures of cattle with details of their age, location and owner. Users hear a mooing sound as they swipe — right to show they’re interested or left to reject possible matches.

Hectare, which designed the app, says it “seeks to unite sheepish farm animals with their soulmates.” Selling animals using social media can speed up a process that often involves transporting animals long distances for breeding. . .


Economic growth foundation for wellbeing

February 26, 2019

The government is trying to persuade us that it’s doing something special in prioritising wellbeing.

That’s a message that will only be bought by people who haven’t worked out that successive governments have cared about and aimed for improved health, education, welfare, security and infrastructure which all contribute to wellbeing and that all these require a foundation of strong economic growth.

Money doesn’t buy happiness but it does buy better education, health services, welfare, security and infrastructure.

Treasury is attempting to put a value on things that contribute to wellbeing, and not doing it very well:

When gaining a friend is deemed more important than avoiding the Emergency Room in Treasury’s model it puts in doubt the analysis that should have underpinned its well-being Budget, National’s Finance spokesperson Amy Adams says.

“Serious questions need to be answered on how the Treasury is being asked to evaluate spending in Budget 2019. The Treasury’s cost benefit analysis (CBAx) model has new well-being values that that look out of step with the values of New Zealanders.

“Gaining a friend is valued at $592 in the revised CBAx – more than the $387 to avoid a trip to A&E. Having contact with a neighbour is valued at $8,572, or more than twice the value of avoiding diabetes.

“Changes to the analysis behind this Government’s policies are another example of its weakness of approach and its repeated failure to deliver.

“We’re a sports-loving nation but not many people would put a higher value on their membership of the local rugby club than access to emergency health services or serious illness.

“Governments always have Budget priorities and the risk with the ‘well-being’ framework is that it ends up being little more than a rebranding exercise.

“National understands that improving the lives of New Zealanders is ultimately about letting Kiwis keep more of what they earn and keeping the cost of living low. Kiwis are better off when they have more in their back-pockets and have access to world-class infrastructure and public services.”

You can’t put a monetary value on gaining a friend or having contact with a neighbour and even if you could that’s not the government’s business.

The government can, and should, however, manage its own spending to allow us all to keep more of what we earn and still provide first class public services.

 


Quote of the day

February 26, 2019

Laughter is the sun that drives winter from the human face. – Victor Hugo who was born on this day in 1802.


February 26 in history

February 26, 2019

747 BC Epoch of Ptolemy‘s Nabonassar Era.

364 Valentinian I was proclaimed Roman Emperor.

1266 Battle of Benevento: An army led by Charles, Count of Anjou, defeated a combined German and Sicilian force led by King Manfred of Sicily who was killed.

1361 Wenceslaus, Holy Roman Emperor, King of Bohemia, was born (d. 1419).

1564 Christopher Marlowe, English dramatist, was born (d. 1593).

1658 Treaty of Roskilde: After a devastating defeat in the Northern Wars(1655-1661), King Frederick III of Denmark-Norway was forced to give up nearly half his territory to Sweden to save the rest.

1794 Christiansborg Palace, Copenhagen burnt down.

1802 Victor Hugo, French writer, was born (d. 1885).

1815 Napoleon Bonaparte escaped from Elba.

1829 – Levi Strauss, German-born clothing designer, was born  (d. 1902).

1844 Two Wellington lawyers, William Brewer and H. Ross, undertook a duel as the result of a quarrel that had arisen from a case in the Wellington County Court. When the two men faced off in Sydney Street, Brewer fired into the air but ‘received Mr. Ross’ ball in the groin’. He died a few days later.

'Pistols at dawn': deadly duel in Wellington

1846 William F. “Buffalo Bill” Cody, American frontiersman, was born  (d. 1917).

1848 The second French Republic was proclaimed.

1852 John Harvey Kellogg, American surgeon, advocate of dietary reform, was born  (d. 1943).

1861  Nadezhda Konstantinovna Krupskaya, Russian revolutionary, Lenin’s wife, was born (d. 1939).

1863 U.S. President Abraham Lincoln signed the National Currency Actinto law.

1866 Herbert Henry Dow, American chemical industrialist, was born (d. 1930).

1870 In New York City, a demonstration of the first pneumatic subwayopened to the public.

1885 The Berlin Act, which resulted from the Berlin Conference regulating European colonization and trade in Africa, was signed.

1887 – At the Sydney Cricket Ground, George Lohmann became the first bowler to take eight wickets in a Test innings.

1909  Fanny Cradock, English food writer and broadcaster, was born (d. 1994).

1914 Robert Alda, American actor, was born (d. 1986).

1914 HMHS Britannic, sister to the RMS Titanic, was launched at Harland & Wolff shipyard in Belfast.

1916  Jackie Gleason, American actor, writer, composer, and comedian, was born (d. 1987).

1917 The Original Dixieland Jazz Band recorded the first ever jazz record for the Victor Talking Machine Company in New York.

1919 An act of the U.S. Congress established most of the Grand Canyon as the Grand Canyon National Park.

1928 Fats Domino, American musician, was born.

1928 Ariel Sharon, Israeli Prime Minister, was born (d. 2014).

1929 The Grand Teton National Park was created.

1932 Johnny Cash, American singer, was born (d. 2003).

1935 The Luftwaffe was re-formed.

1935 The Daventry Experiment, Robert Watson-Watt carried out a demonstration near Daventry which led directly to the development of RADAR in the United Kingdom.

1936 Adolf Hitler opened the 1st Volkswagen plant in East Germany.

1936 – In the February 26 Incident, young Japanese military officers attempted to stage a coup against the government.

1947 – Sandie Shaw, English singer, was born.

1949 Elizabeth George, American novelist, was born.

1950 Helen Clark, former Prime Minister of New Zealand, was born.

1952 British Prime Minister Winston Churchill announced that his nation had an atomic bomb.

1954 Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, Prime Minister of Turkey, was born.

1954 Ernst August, Prince of Hanover, heir to the deposed Kingdom of Hanover and a husband of Princess Caroline of Monaco., was born.

1955 Andreas Maislinger, founder of Austrian Holocaust Memorial Service, was born.

1958 Susan J. Helms, Astronaut, was born.

1966 Apollo Programme: Launch of AS-201, the first flight of the Saturn IB rocket.

1968  Tim Commerford, American bass player (Rage Against the Machine), was born.

1971  U.N. Secretary General U Thant signed the United Nations’ proclamation of the vernal equinox as Earth Day.

1972 The Buffalo Creek Flood caused by a burst dam killed 125 in West Virginia.

1987 Iran-Contra affair: The Tower Commission rebuked President Ronald Reagan for not controlling his national security staff.

1990 The Sandinistas were defeated in Nicaraguan elections.

1991  Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein announced the withdrawal of Iraqi troops from Kuwait.

1993 World Trade Centre bombing: A truck bomb parked below the North Tower of the World Trade Center exploded, killing 6 and injuring more than a thousand.

1995 The United Kingdom’s oldest investment banking institute, Barings Bank, collapsed after a securities broker, Nick Leeson, lost $1.4 billion by speculating on the Singapore International Monetary Exchange using futures contracts.

2000 Mount Hekla in Iceland erupted.

2001 The Taliban destroyed two giant statues of Buddha in Bamyan, Afghanistan.

2003 War in Darfur started.

2004 – F.Y.R.O.M. President Boris Trajkovski was killed in a plane crash near Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

2005 Hosni Mubarak the president of Egypt ordered the constitution changed to allow multi-candidate presidential elections before September 2005 by asking Egyptian parliament to amend Article 76.

2012 – A train derailed in Burlington, Ontario, Canada killing at least three people and injuring 45.

2013 – A hot air balloon crashed near Luxor, Egypt, killing 19 people.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia.


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