Word of the day

February 24, 2019

Purl  – denoting or relating to a knitting stitch made by putting the needle through the front of the stitch from right to left; knit with a purl stitch; a cord of twisted gold or silver wire used for bordering or edging something; an ornamental edging of lace or ribbon; ((of a stream or river) flow with a swirling motion and babbling sound; a purling motion or sound.


Thatcher thinks

February 24, 2019


Crossing the Line

February 24, 2019

I have too much to lose, she said, if I cross that line. Like what? I said. She could not think of anything that day so she said she’d get back to me. Since then I’ve been thinking what I would lose if I cross my line & I haven’t come up with anything either. There’s always another line somewhere. – Crossing the Line – © 2016 Brian Andreas – posted with permission.

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Rural round-up

February 24, 2019

Don’t take us for mugs – Katie Milne:

Farmers are out of patience with local and regional councils treating them as cash cows.

A recent Federated Farmers survey shows fewer than 4% of farmers believe they get good value for money from their local government rates. It is local government elections this year and those wannabe councillors chasing farmer votes can expect some pointy questions from our sector.

Such as: why have average council rates in New Zealand jumped 79.7% between June 2007 and June 2017, when inflation (CPI) for the same period was only 23.1%? . . 

Not so wild about pines:

Concerns about the continued spread of wilding pines are coming from both ends of the country.

Warnings have been sounded in recent weeks about the serious menace not only to the high country but also to Northland’s coastal margins and dune lakes.

NZ Deerstalkers’ Association spokesman Bill O’Leary, of Nelson, says recent events have highlighted the fire risk. . . 

NZ Young Farmers club established in Kaikoura

A new group has been set up in Kaikoura to help connect young people with an interest in the agri-food sector.

A NZ Young Farmers club has been established, after new resident Hannah Bradshaw noticed a need.

“I moved to Kaikoura late last year. The first thing I noticed was the district didn’t have a place where like-minded young people working in the rural sector could connect,” she said. . . 

Drought or tempest on a farmer’s land may fall – Samantha Motion:

“Worm or beetle, drought or tempest on a farmer’s land may fall. Each is loaded full o’ ruin but the mortgage beats ’em all.”

Growing up, a cheery cross stitch bearing this quote by American poet Will Carleton hung in the hall of my family’s farmhouse near Rotorua.

It was meant to be a light-hearted message, I think, but the older I got and the more I understood about the family business, the more ominous I found the words. . . 

 

 

Today’s extreme winter weather can impact tomorrow’s crop farming – Jim Foerster:

The U.S. Department of Agriculture estimates that 90% of crop losses are related to extreme weather – but it’s not just the direct impact of summer drought, floods and severe storms. Last week’s cold snap – and others that could still happen in these final weeks of winter – will have significant impact on crops that we may not see for months.

While it’s easy to see how the extreme cold can impact farm-related things like livestock safety, fresh water availability and farm machinery, there are many other impacts of the cold as well. With more than 127 million acres of agricultural land in the Midwest, it’s got crop farmers thinking about the future impact of this cold on crops, particularly the 25% of the land that is used for winter wheat, and perennial crops like alfalfa and fruit trees and bushes. . . 

Lab-grown meat could be worse for the environment – Kristin Houser:

Meat farming is a major contributor of the greenhouse gases driving climate change. To ensure we never have to choose between a livable planet and a juicy hamburger, scientists are attempting to efficiently grow convincing imitation meat in the lab using everything from volcano-dwelling microbes to stem cells.

But new research suggests the efforts of those scientists might be in vain — it turns out that growing meat in the lab might actually do more damage to the environment than producing it the traditional way.

Meat Market

For their study, published Tuesday in the journal Frontiers in Sustainable Food Systems, researchers from the Oxford Martin School compared the potential impact on the global temperature over the next 1,000 years of three cattle farming methods and four potential methods for growing meat in the lab. . . 

 


Sunday soapbox

February 24, 2019

Sunday’s soapbox is yours to use as you will – within the bounds of decency and absence of defamation. You’re welcome to look back or forward, discuss issues of the moment, to pontificate, ponder or point us to something of interest, to educate, elucidate or entertain, amuse, bemuse or simply muse, but not abuse.

Image result for quotes tax

There can be no such thing as ‘fairness in taxation.’ Taxation is nothing but organized theft, and the concept of a ‘fair tax’ is therefore every bit as absurd as that of ‘fair theft.’ – Murray Rothbard

 


February 24 in history

February 24, 2019

303 – Galerius, Roman Emperor, published his edict that began the persecution of Christians in his portion of the Empire.

1387  King Charles III of Naples and Hungary was assassinated at Buda.

1538 Treaty of Nagyvarad between Ferdinand I and John Zápolya.

1582 Pope Gregory XIII announced the Gregorian calendar.

1607 – L’Orfeo by Claudio Monteverdi, one of the first works recognised as an opera, premiered.

1711 The London première of Rinaldo by George Frideric Handel, the first Italian opera written for the London  stage.

1739 Battle of Karnal: The army of Iranian ruler Nadir Shah defeated the forces of the Mughal emperor of India, Muhammad Shah.

1786 Wilhelm Grimm, German philologist and folklorist, was born (d. 1859).

1803 The Supreme Court of the United States, in Marbury v. Madison, established the principle of judicial review.

1804 London‘s Drury Lane Theatre burnt to the ground, leaving ownerRichard Brinsley Sheridan destitute.

1822 The 1st Swaminarayan temple in the world, Shri Swaminarayan Mandir, Ahmedabad, was inaugurated.

1826  The signing of the Treaty of Yandaboo marked the end of the First Burmese War.

1827  – Lydia Becker, English-French activist, was born (d. 1890).

1831 The Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, the first removal treaty in accordance with the Indian Removal Act, was proclaimed. The Choctawsin Mississippi ceded land east of the river in exchange for payment and land in the West.

1835  – Julius Vogel, English-New Zealand journalist and politician, 8th Prime Minister of New Zealand, was born(d. 1899).

1837 – Rosalía de Castro, Spanish poet, was born (d. 1885).

1839 William Otis received a patent for the steam shovel.

1848 King Louis-Philippe of France abdicated.

1868 The first parade to have floats was staged at Mardi Gras in New Orleans.

1868 – Andrew Johnson became the first President of the United States to be impeached by the United States House of Representatives.

1870 – The final detachment of the 18th (Royal Irish) Regiment departed from New Zealand, leaving the Armed Constabulary (formed in 1867) responsible for the colony’s internal defence.
Last detachment of imperial forces leaves New Zealand

1875 The SS Gothenburg hit the Great Barrier Reef and sank off the Australian east coast, killing approximately 100.

1877  Ettie Rout, New Zealand activist, was born  (d. 1936).

1893 The American University was chartered by an act of the Congress.

1895 Revolution broke out in Baire beginning the second war for Cubanindependence.

1899 Western Washington University was established.

1902 The Battle of Langverwacht Hill ended.

1909 – The Hudson Motor Car Company was founded.

1912: The hull of TSS Earnslaw was launched in Kingston.

SS <em>Earnslaw</em> launched on Lake Wakatipu

1917 The U.S. ambassador to the United Kingdom was given the Zimmermann Telegram, in which Germany pledged to ensure the return of New Mexico, Texas, and Arizona to Mexico if Mexico declares war on the United States.

1918 – Estonian Declaration of Independence.

1920 The Nazi Party was founded.

1934 – Bettino Craxi, Italian lawyer and politician, 45th Prime Minister of Italy, was born (d. 2000).

1942 Battle of Los Angeles: a UFO flying over Los Angeles caused a blackout order at 2:25 a.m. and attracted a barrage of anti-aircraft fire, ultimately killing 3 civilians.

1942 Paul Jones, English singer (Manfred Mann), was born.

1944  – Ivica Račan, Croatian lawyer and politician, 7th Prime Minister of Croatia, was born (d. 2007).

1945 Egyptian Premier Ahmed Maher Pasha was killed in Parliament.

1948 Dennis Waterman, British actor, was born.

1951 – Laimdota Straujuma, Latvian economist and politician, 12th Prime Minister of Latvia was born.

1955 – Alain Prost, French race car driver, was born.

1968  The Tet Offensive was halted; South Vietnam recaptured Hué.

1970 National Public Radio was founded in the United States.

1976 Cuba’s national Constitution proclaimed.

1981 Buckingham Palace announced the engagement of Prince Charles and Lady Diana Spencer.

1981 –  The Ms Gulf of Corinth earthquake registering 6.7 on the Richter scale hit Athens, killing 16 people and destroying buildings in several towns west of the city.

1989 – Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini offered a USD $3 million bounty for the death of The Satanic Verses’ author Salman Rushdie.

1989 – United Airlines Flight 811, bound for New Zealand from Honolulu, Hawaii, ripped open during flight, sucking 9 passengers out of the business-class section.

1999 – A China Southern Airlines Tupolev TU-154 airliner crashed on approach to Wenzhou airport killing 61.

2006 Philippine President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo declared Proclamation 1017 placing the country in a state of emergency in attempt to subdue a possible military coup.

2007 Japan launched its fourth spy satellite.

2008 Fidel Castro retired as the President of Cuba.

2010 – Sachin Tendulkar scored the first double century in One Day International cricket.

2011 – Final Launch of Space Shuttle Discovery (OV-103).

2013 – Patriarch Neofit of Bulgaria was elected and enthroned as a Patriarch of Bulgaria and all Bulgarians.

2015 – A Metrolink train derailed in Oxnard, California, following a collision with a truck, leaves more than 30 injured.

2016 – Tara Air Flight 193, a de Havilland Canada DHC-6 Twin Otter aircraft, crashed, with 23 fatalities, in Solighopte, Myagdi District, Dhaulagiri Zone, while en route from Pokhara Airport to Jomsom Airport.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia, the ODT and Te Ara Encyclopedia of NZ.


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