Word of the day

February 1, 2019

Apricate – to bask in the sun; sunbathe; expose to sunlight.


Sowell says

February 1, 2019


Rural round-up

February 1, 2019

Flavours of childhood – Rebecca Fox:

Growing up in Argentina with Italian family heritage, it is not surprising Pablo Tacchini became a chef. Having just become a Beef + Lamb ambassador chef, he tells Rebecca Fox it has taken a lot of hard work to get to this point.

Weekends were feast times in Pablo Tacchini’s childhood home in Argentina.

He would spend his mornings either in the kitchen making pasta with his grandmother or outside helping his father and grandfather barbecue.

”I grew up with that. Food is very important for me. It was an easy choice to see what I wanted to do.”

While he now lives and works thousands of kilometres from home, it is those flavours and experiences he seeks to replicate. . .

Federated Farmers on clean waterways survey: ‘Throwing rocks at farming all the time is just not helping’ – Eric Frykberg:

Federated Farmers has accused Fish & Game of using leading questions in a survey on clean waterways.

The agency commissioned a survey on public attitudes on protecting rivers and lakes from pollution.

The survey, by the research group Colmar Brunton, said 82 percent of respondents would support mandatory environmental standards for New Zealand’s waterways, enforced by local councils.

But Federated Farmers water spokesperson Chris Allen said the group asked leading questions. . .

$15m cherry project announced

Development of Central Otago’s cherry industry is set to continue with another multimillion-dollar venture announced this week.

Cherry investment firm Hortinvest is seeking expressions of interest from investors for a $15.5million orchard project on an 80ha site at Mt Pisa, near Cromwell.

It was the third cherry investment to be led by Hortinvest within the last two years in Central Otago and was to meet “an unprecedented global demand for premium cherries”, a Hortinvest statement said . . 

Recognising a dairy sector champion: Adrian van Bysterveldt:

The dairy sector is recognising the loss of one of its greatest champions, South Island-based Adrian van Bysterveldt.

Adrian was a passionate advocate and leader for pasture-based farm systems and his work helped shape and influence the direction of dairy farming, particularly in the South Island where he was a dedicated leader.

“Adrian was so passionate about all things dairy and really believed in pasture-based farm systems, he had an incredible enthusiasm for the sector and the people in it,” said Tim Mackle, DairyNZ chief executive. . . 

New way of applying fertiliser has potential to benefit the environment:

A new guide has been released which will assist farmers and the irrigation industry to adopt the use of fertigation – a new way of applying fertiliser which is likely to reduce nitrogen leaching and save labour on farms.

Fertigation allows irrigators to be used to apply liquid fertiliser or liquid soluble fertiliser in small quantities at the same time as water. In New Zealand, most fertiliser currently used is solid and applied through ground spreading or aerial top dressing.

Internationally, fertigation is increasingly being adopted as good environmental practice. . . 

Unmodified quad bikes unsuitable for mustering cattle – Kate Dowler:

UNMODIFIED quad bikes have been ruled unsuitable for mustering cattle, in a landmark recent Queensland court decision.

And farmers are being warned the ruling means they could be held liable over quad bike accidents.

The decision has prompted calls from the National Farmers’ Federation for the safety of the bikes to be improved by manufacturers and for riders to also be held more accountable for their own safety. . . 

 


Don’t let the facts get in the way . .

February 1, 2019

. . . of your bias:

Which begs the question: how do you synthetise an element>


A plot so cunning . .

February 1, 2019

The play opens in a private room with a well stocked bar.

Simon raising a glass: Well done Jim, your report‘s upset every employer group and business organisation in the country.

Jim: Thank you. (takes a sip of whiskey) You don’t think I’ve overdone it?

Paula: No, not at all. It’s just what we need – recommendations so ridiculously pro-union and anti-employer and worker, even the really left-wing media will have to admit it would be madness to follow them.

Just look at the media releases.

The EMA says  Fair Pay Agreements make no economic sense, the Canterbury Employers Chamber of Commerce says they’re not fit for the future of work, and BusinessNZ says the compulsory nature of fair pay agreements and the risk of industrial action and productivity loss are key concerns.

Amy: You sounded really convincing, as if you believed what you were saying. And it’s so cleverly designed to handicap growth, hamstring productivity and act as a hand brake on innovation that it can’t possibly be actioned.

Simon: I was only a kid but I remember Mum and Dad talking about how the unions used to wield all the power, hold businesses to ransom, and how hard it was when workers were forced to strike ran out of money to feed themselves and their families.

Paula: We’ll have to be careful about that because a lot of people would have been too young to really remember what it was like, they might think we’re just scaremongering.

Amy: Even farmers who hadn’t been born in the 60, 70s and early 80s know the stories of how hard it was when the freezing workers kept striking so they couldn’t get stock killed, even when they were running out of feed and facing very real animal welfare issues.

Paula:  Good point. And of course the threat of all those Christmas flights being cancelled gave younger people a taste of what could happen and reminded older ones what used to happen – ferries dock-bound every school holidays because the wharfies or cooks and stewards were on strike.

Simon: Those so-called failed policies you introduced have sure saved workers and businesses big and small a lot of heart ache, Jim. Our productivity over the last few decades hasn’t been anything to celebrate but think how much worse it would have been with national awards, compulsory unionism and all the trouble that went with them.

Jim: takes another sip of his whiskey,  swallows, Yeah, I guess that’s why I’m worried about the report. People are going to think I’ve gone gaga recommending we go back to those bad old days.

Simon: Ah well, we all make sacrifices for the good of the party, Jim. You know how much we appreciate the ammunition you’ve given us, and of course we know there’s no risk of anything too serious going through because your friend W-

A knock on the door sounds. Paula opens the door and tales a note from a secretary.

Paula: It’s for you Jim. She hands it to him.

Jim:  takes another sip of whiskey, smiles. Ah yes, speak of the devil, Winston has just phoned, he wants me to call him.


Quote of the day

February 1, 2019

It is well, when in difficulties, to say never a word, neither black nor white. Speech is silver but silence is golden. – Muriel Spark who was born on this day in 1918.


February 1 in history

February 1, 2019

1327 Teenaged Edward III was crowned King of England, but the country was ruled by his mother Queen Isabella and her lover Roger Mortimer.

1662 Chinese general Koxinga seized the island of Taiwan after a nine-month siege.

1663 Mother Ignacia del Espiritu Santo, Filipino foundress of the Religious of the Virgin Mary, was born  (d. 1748).

1790 The Supreme Court of the United States attempted to convene for the first time.

1793 French Revolutionary Wars: France declared war on the United Kingdom and the Netherlands.

1814 Mayon Volcano, in the Philippines, erupted, killing around 1,200 people.

1842 The Fifeshire arrived in Nelson with the first immigrants for the New Zealand Company’s latest venture, which followed the settlement of Wellington, New Plymouth and Wanganui.

First NZ Company settlers arrive in Nelson

1861 Texas seceded from the United States.

1862 Julia Ward Howe‘s “Battle Hymn of the Republic” was published for the first time in the Atlantic Monthly.

1865 President Abraham Lincoln signed the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution.

1873 John Barry, Irish recipient of the Victoria Cross, was born (d. 1901).

1884 Edition one of the Oxford English Dictionary was published.

1893 Thomas A. Edison finishes construction of the first motion picture studio, the Black Maria in West Orange, New Jersey.

1896 The opera La bohème premieresd in Turin.

1897 Shinhan Bank, the oldest bank in South Korea, opened in Seoul.

1901 Clark Gable, American actor, was born  (d. 1960).

1908 King Carlos I of Portugal and his son, Prince Luis Filipe were killed in Terreiro do Paco, Lisbon.

1918 Muriel Spark, Scottish author, was born  (d. 2006).

1920 The Royal Canadian Mounted Police began operations.

1931 Boris Yeltsin, 1st President of the Russian Federation, was born.

1934 Bob Shane, American folk singer (The Kingston Trio), was born.

1937 Don Everly, American musician (Everly Brothers), was born.

1937 Ray Sawyer, American singer (Dr. Hook & the Medicine Show), was born.

1942 Vidkun Quisling was appointed Premier of Norway by the Nazi occupiers.

1943 The German 6th Army surrendered at Stalingrad.

1946 Trygve Lie of Norway was picked to be the first United Nations Secretary General.

1957 Felix Wankel‘s first working prototype DKM 54 of the Wankel enginewas running at the NSU research and development departmentVersuchsabteilung TX in Germany.

1958 Egypt and Syria merged to form the United Arab Republic, which lasted until 1961.

1958 The United States Army launched Explorer 1.

1960 Four black students staged the first of the Greensboro sit-ins.

1965 The Hamilton River in Labrador, Canada was renamed the Churchill River in honour of Winston Churchill.

1968 – Canada’s three military services, the Royal Canadian Navy, the Canadian Army and the Royal Canadian Air Force, were unified into theCanadian Forces.

1972  Kuala Lumpur became a city by a royal charter granted by the Yang di-Pertuan Agong of Malaysia.

1974 A fire in the 25-story Joelma Building in Sao Paulo killed 189 and injures 293.

1979 – The Ayatollah Khomeini was welcomed back into Tehran after nearly 15 years of exile.

1981 Trans-Tasman sporting relations reached breaking point at the Melbourne Cricket Ground when Australian captain Greg Chappell ordered his brother Trevor to bowl underarm (along the ground) for the final delivery of a limited-overs cricket international against New Zealand.

Trevor Chappell bowls underarm

1989 The Western Australian towns of Kalgoorlie and Boulder amalgamate to form the City of Kalgoorlie-Boulder.

1992 The Chief Judicial Magistrate of Bhopal court declares Warren Anderson, ex-CEO of Union Carbide, a fugitive under Indian law for failing to appear in the Bhopal Disaster case.

1996 The Communications Decency Act was passed by the U.S. Congress.

1998 Rear Admiral Lillian E. Fishburne became the first female African American to be promoted to rear admiral.

2003 – Space Shuttle Columbia disintegrated during reentry into the Earth’s atmosphere, killing all seven astronauts aboard.

2004 251 people were trampled to death and 244 injured in a stampede at the Hajj pilgrimage in Saudi Arabia.

2005 King Gyanendra exercised a coup d’état to capture Nepal, becoming Chairman of the Councils of ministers.

2005 – Canada introduced the Civil Marriage Act, making Canada the fourth country to sanction same-sex marriage.

2009 Jóhanna Sigurðardóttir was elected as the first female Prime Minister of Iceland, becoming the first openly gay head of state in the modern world.

2013 – The Shard, the tallest building in the European Union, was opened to the public.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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