Not achieved for petition wording

The relatively trivial saga of the year 13 pupils who didn’t know what trivial means  has another chapter.

The pupil who initiated the petition has a problem constructing sentences and I am giving him a not achieved for his wording.

The preamble to the petition reads:

The year 13 History Causes and Consequences essay has made the decision of including an unfamiliar word (trivial) which caused much confusion among the students who were sitting the exams on the 14th of November 2018. The word which many students were not particularly familiar with meant that student’s had to write the essay based on their own understanding of the word. Many of which were different to what the word actually means; meaning that the true potential of many students are going to be covered. This petition is made for the government to recognize the true potential of the students and mark the essay based on the student’s own content and understanding of the event. Please do not feel threatened for this is only a petition to recognize the hard work and efforts put in by many across the country.

First there’s. . . essay has made the decision of including. .

Following the writer’s style, I have to confess I am unfamiliar with essays making decisions and with the phrasing decision of  including. I am much more familiar with decision to include.

Then there’s:

Many of which were different to what the word actually means; meaning that the true potential of many students are going to be covered.

Is there a missing not in that sentence? Should it be: meaning that the true potential of many students are not going to be covered?

Regardless of whether the not is missing, potential is singular so it should be is not are.

After correcting the grammar I’m still struggling to understand what meaning that the true potential of many students is (or is not) going to be covered means.

If the pupils aren’t familiar with the word trivial and express themselves as poorly as the petitioner they are in need of considerable help to use whatever potential they have.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: