365 days of gratitude

November 7, 2018

Bulaman wished us happy Diwali in a comment on this morning’s quote page.

A few years ago I wouldn’t have had a clue what Diwali was.

A trip to India in 2015 and a growing Indian population here celebrating their culture have educated me and I’m grateful for that.


Word of the day

November 7, 2018

Hippanthropy – the  delusional belief that one is a horse; form of zoanthropy in which the patient believes that s/he is a horse; an instance of this.


Rural round-up

November 7, 2018

Farmers re-elect dissident ex-director Leonie Guiney to Fonterra board – Rebecca Howard:

(BusinessDesk) – Fonterra Cooperative Group shareholders have effectively delivered a rebuke to the sitting board by voting to elect outspoken former director Leonie Guiney to the board while failing to support two of three board nominations.

Zespri chairman Peter McBride was also elected to the cooperative’s governance team, but board-backed Maori commercial leader Jamie Tuuta and an incumbent director, Ashleigh Waugh, both failed to gain the 50 percent support required for election to the board, as did self-nominated candidate John Nicholls, leaving one board seat unfilled ahead of Thursday’s annual meeting in Lichfield. . .

Early testing indicates Mycoplasma bovis eradication still possible – Rebecca Howard:

(BusinessDesk) – Early results from nationwide bulk milk testing for Mycoplasma bovis suggests eradication remains possible, the Ministry for Primary Industries says.

To date, more than 51,000 of approximately 70,000 tests have been completed and only three farms have been confirmed to have the cattle disease.

Testing to date reinforces the theory the country is facing a single strain of the bacterial infection that affects cows. . .

 

Renewed FTA deal unlikely to bear more benefits for dairy industry – Craig McCulloch:

New Zealand looks highly unlikely to secure a better deal for dairy exporters as part of an improved free trade agreement with China. 

Under the current agreement, New Zealand’s dairy products are hit with higher tariffs once they reach a certain amount.

Those limits automatically expire by 2022 and 2024, but the dairy industry had hoped to bring those dates forward as part of negotiations to upgrade the overall deal. . .

Feds optimistic about local government review:

The thoroughness of an issues paper released today on local government funding and financing is cause for optimism, Federated Farmers President Katie Milne says.

“The Productivity Commission’s paper sets out key topics as it investigates what drives local government costs now and into the foreseeable future, and invites people to comment on the shortcomings of current systems, as well as suggest alternatives. . .

Fonterra Dairy Woman of the Year 2019 nominations now open:

As Dairy Women’s Network nears the end of its 20th anniversary, it’s launching into its next celebration by announcing the opening of nominations for the 2019 Fonterra Dairy Woman of the Year.

Next year will mark the eighth year for the prestigious award which celebrates women who have made outstanding contributions to New Zealand’s dairy industry.

Dairy Women’s Network CEO Jules Benton says with 2019 her first Fonterra Dairy Woman of the Year Awards as CEO, she’s looking forward to celebrating the leadership and diversity of women in the dairy industry.

Research forum helps build New Zealand’s primary sector workforce:

The Primary Industry Capability Alliance (PICA) is set to host a one-day research forum for organisations, businesses and government agencies interested in building the human capability of New Zealand’s primary sectors.

Delegates will be updated with the latest analysis, research and various initiatives relating to the sector’s workforce. “For our primary sectors to continue leading the world,” PICA’s CEO Michelle Glogau says, “we need to attract and retain a diverse range of people with different talents in a diverse range of roles. Robotics engineers, geneticists, farm managers…We need 50,000 more people to join the sector by 2025.” . . 


Guiney election sends message to Fonterra

November 7, 2018

Fonterra shareholders have sent a clear message to the Fonterra board with the re-election of Leonie Guiney:

Discarded former Fonterra board member Leonie Guiney has side-stepped the official selection process to win farmer backing to regain her seat.

She will be joined by retiring Zespri chairman Peter McBride. The other candidates incumbent director Ashley Waugh, approved candidate Jamie Tuuta and independent John Nicholls failed to get the required 50% approval so another election will be held to fill the one seat still vacant. 

The failure for any of these three to get the necessary 50% support indicates that many shareholders voted tactically – voting for only one or two of the successful candidates to ensure they got through.

Guiney, a Fairlie farmer and director of four farming companies served on Fonterra’s board from 2014 to 2017 but then failed to gain approval to stand again through the co-op’s selection process. McBride lives at Te Puna and has farming interests in Waikato and Bay of Plenty. He has extensive experience in the kiwifruit industry and has recently announced that he will step down as chairman of Zespri in February.

A lot of shareholders aren’t happy with the way the board controls who can stand and many weren’t impressed when Leonie wasn’t approved to stand again.

On top of that is the company’s performance which is causing considerable angst.

This result shows shareholders are far from happy.

The board already has a new chair and acting chief executive who have clearly signaled a need for change.

The election result gives a mandate for that and a very clear message that shareholders are looking for significant improvements.

 


Quote of the day

November 7, 2018

You will never be happy if you continue to search for what happiness consists of. You will never live if you are looking for the meaning of life. ― Albert Camus  who was born on this day in 1913.


November 7 in history

November 7, 2018

680 The Sixth Ecumenical Council commenced in Constantinople.

1492 The Ensisheim Meteorite, the oldest meteorite with a known date of impact, struck the earth in a wheat field outside the village of Ensisheim, France.

1619 Elizabeth of Scotland and England was crowned Queen of Bohemia.

1665 The London Gazette, the oldest surviving journal, was first published.

1728 Captain James Cook, British naval officer, explorer, and cartographer, was born (d 1779).

1775 John Murray, the Royal Governor of the Colony of Virginia, started the first mass emancipation of slaves in North America by issuing Lord Dunmore’s Offer of Emancipation, which offered freedom to slaves who abandoned their colonial masters in order to fight with Murray and the British.

1786 The oldest musical organisation in the United States was founded as the Stoughton Musical Society.

1811 Tecumseh’s War: The Battle of Tippecanoe.

1837 Abolitionist printer Elijah P. Lovejoy was shot dead by a mob while attempting to protect his printing shop from being destroyed a third time.

1848 The paddle steamer Acheron arrived to being surveying New Zealand waters.

1861 American Civil War: Battle of Belmont: Forces led by General Ulysses S. Grant overran a Confederate camp but were forced to retreat when Confederate reinforcements arrive.

1867 Maria Sklodowska-Curie, Polish chemist and physicist, recipient of the Nobel Prize in physics and in chemistry, was born (d 1934).

1872 The ship Mary Celeste sailed from New York.

1874 A cartoon by Thomas Nast in Harper’s Weekly, was considered the first important use of an elephant as a symbol for the United States Republican Party.

1879 Leon Trotsky, Russian revolutionary, was born (d 1940).

1885 Construction ended on the Canadian Pacific Railway railway extending across Canada.

1893 Women in the U.S. state of Colorado were granted the right to vote.

1900 Battle of Leliefontein, a battle during which the Royal Canadian Dragoons won three Victoria Crosses.

1907 Jesús García saved the entire town of Nacozari de Garcia, Sonora by driving a burning train full of dynamitesix kilometers away before it could explode.

1908 Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid were reportedly killed in San Vicente, Bolivia.

1910 The first air freight shipment was undertaken by the Wright Brothers and department store owner Max Moorehouse.

1912 – The Public Service Act was passed into law, creating a framework for New Zealand’s bureaucracy that lasted until 1988. The Act was the brainchild of lawyer Alexander Herdman, a senior minister in the new Reform Party government.

Public Service Act passed into law

1912 The Deutsche Opernhaus (now Deutsche Oper Berlin) opened in Berlin with a production of Beethoven’s Fidelio.

1913 Albert Camus, French writer, Nobel Prize laureate, was born (d 1960).

1914 The first issue of The New Republic magazine was published.

1914 – The German colony of Kiaochow Bay and its centre at Tsingtaowere captured by Japanese forces.

1916 Jeannette Rankin was the first woman elected to the United States Congress.

1917 The Gregorian calendar date of the October Revolution, which got its name from the Julian calendar date of 25 October – the Bolsheviks stormed the Winter Palace.

1917 World War I: Third Battle of Gaza ended: British forces captured Gaza from the Ottoman Empire.

1918 The 1918 influenza epidemic spread to Western Samoa, killing 7,542 (about 20% of the population) by the end of the year.

1918 Kurt Eisner overthrew the Wittelsbach dynasty in the Kingdom of Bavaria.

1918 Billy Graham, American evangelist was born.

1919 The first Palmer Raid was conducted on the second anniversary of the Russian Revolution. More than 10,000 suspected communists and anarchists were arrested in twenty-three different U.S. cities.

1920 Patriarch Tikhon issued a decree that lead to the formation ofRussian Orthodox Church Outside Russia.

1921 The Partito Nazionale Fascista (PNF), National Fascist Party, comes into existence.

1926 Dame Joan Sutherland, Australian operatic soprano, was born (d 2010).

1929 The Museum of Modern Art in New York opened to the public.

1931 The Chinese Soviet Republic was proclaimed on the anniversary of the Bolshevik Revolution.

1940 The original Tacoma Narrows Bridge collapsed in a windstorm, just four months after the bridge’s completion.

1941 Soviet hospital ship Armenia was sunk by German planes while evacuating refugees and wounded military and staff of several Crimea’s hospitals – killing more than 5,000 people.

1943 – Dame Silvia Cartwright, New Zealand lawyer, judge, and politician, 18th Governor-General of New Zealand, was born.

SilviaCartwright.jpg

1943 Joni Mitchell, Canadian musician, was born.

1944 A passenger train derailed in Aguadilla, Puerto Rico from excessive speed when descending a hill. 16 people were killed and 50 injured.

1944 Soviet spy Richard Sorge, a half-Russian, half-German World War I veteran, and 34 of his spy-ring, were hanged by his Japanese captors.

1944 Franklin D. Roosevelt elected for a record fourth term as President of the United States of America.

1963 Wunder von Lengede: Eleven miners were rescued from a collapsed mine after 14 days.

1967 Carl B. Stokes was elected as Mayor of Cleveland, Ohio, becoming the first African American mayor of a major American city.

1970 Long-haired Christchurch mountaineers John Glasgow and Peter Gough became the first to successfully scale the 2000-metre Caroline Faceof Aoraki/Mt Cook, declaring it a ‘triumph for the hippies’.

Aoraki/Mt Cook route conquered by hippies

1975 In Bangladesh a joint force of people and soldiers took part in an uprising hailed as National Revolution and Solidarity Day, led by Col. Abu Taher that ousted and killed Brig. Khaled Mosharraf.

1983 United States Senate bombing: a bomb exploded inside the United States Capitol.

1987 In Tunisia, president Habib Bourguiba was overthrown and replaced by Prime Minister Zine El Abidine Ben Ali.

1989 Douglas Wilder won the governor’s seat in Virginia, becoming the first elected African American governor in the United States.

1989 David Dinkins became the first African American mayor of New York City.

1989 – East German Prime Minister Willi Stoph and his cabinet were forced to resign after huge anti-government protests.

1990 Mary Robinson became the first woman to be elected President of the Republic of Ireland.

1991 Magic Johnson announced that he was infected with HIV and retired from the NBA.

1994 WXYC, the student radio station of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, provided the world’s first internet radio broadcast.

1996 NASA launched the Mars Global Surveyor.

2000 – Hillary Rodham Clinton was elected to the United States Senate, becoming the first former First Lady to win public office in the United States.

2000 – Controversial US presidential election that is later resolved in theBush v. Gore Supreme Court Case.

2002 Iran banned advertising of United States products.

2004 War in Iraq: The interim government of Iraq calls for a 60-day “state of emergency” as U.S. forces storm the insurgent stronghold of Fallujah.

2006 Chicago O’Hare UFO sighting

2007 Jokela school shooting in Tuusula, Finland, resulted in the death of nine people.

2012 – An earthquake off the Pacific coast of Guatemala killed at least 52 people.

2017 – Shamshad TV was attacked by armed gunmen and suicide bombers. A security guard was killed and 20 people were wounded. ISIS claimed responsibility for the attack.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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