Word of the day

November 3, 2018

Rhathymia – the state of being carefree; light-heartedness.


365 days of gratitude

November 3, 2018

All wedding should be special, celebrating the couple and their love for one and other; acknowledging the universality of marriage and the uniqueness of the couple’s bond, and reminding those of us already married about what’s important.

Today’s wedding did all that and did it well for which I’m very grateful.


Rural round-up

November 3, 2018

Fonterra fails test –  Hugh Stringleman:

Fonterra achieved a positive result in only one of its nine key performance indicators in the 2018 financial year, its Shareholders’ Council says.

That one positive was the milk price of $6.69/kg MS up 9% from the season before.

Negative achievements against targets were recorded for the total amount available for payout, earnings per share, consumer and food service volume, the gearing ratio, working capital days, return on capital, milk volume collected and employee injuries. . .

Law change could target farmers with poor environmental record – Maja Burry:

Farmers and other stakeholders are being asked to have their say on legislation governing the nearly $17 billion diary industry. 

In May, the government began a review of the Dairy Industry Restructuring Act (DIRA) 2001, which regulates Fonterra as the dominant player in the market to protect farmers, consumers and the wider economy.

The review will look at how the price of raw milk is set for farmers, how competitive the milk market is – as well as incentives for farmers to move into more sustainable production methods. . .

Fonterra acknowledges release of DIRA options paper:

Fonterra acknowledges the release today of the Government’s options paper on the review of the Dairy Industry Restructuring Act.

The Act is a complex piece of legislation and it’s important to New Zealand that the review is thorough.

We recognise the significant work that the Ministry for Primary Industries and Minister O’Connor have put into the document and we appreciate their high degree of engagement with industry so far. . . 

Not meeting honey rules cost Auckland businessman $26,000:

An Auckland businessman has been fined more than $26,000 for offences related to making false therapeutic claims about honey and failing to ensure he was a registered exporter.

Jonathan Paul Towers, 43, has been sentenced in the Auckland District Court and fined $26,300 after earlier pleading guilty to one charge under the Food Act and one charge under the Animal Products Act. . .

WIL locks in $11.5 M toward revised Dam cost:

To secure a 100-year water supply for Tasman and Nelson through the Waimea Community Dam, a group of local businesses has committed to invest $11 million in Waimea Irrigators Limited. Waimea Irrigators Limited (WIL) is issuing a Replacement Product Disclosure Statement (PDS) to shareholders today detailing its additional investment of $11.5 million in the $102 million Dam project.

In August it was announced that the cost of the project increased by $26 million. Subsequently, Tasman District Council (TDC) approved a revised funding proposal that included a greater WIL contribution. Through an investor vehicle and additional in loan funding from Crown Irrigation Investments Limited (CIIL), WIL can meet its commitment to the project. . . 

Bird Mask’ now available to buy

Off the back of some seriously positive chirping, Air New Zealand and material innovation brand Allbirds have made their collaboratively designed eye mask, dubbed the ‘Bird Mask’, available to purchase online and at selected Nordstrom stores in the United States. . .

From today, fans of the Bird Mask can purchase their very own mask through the Allbirds online store, the Air New Zealand Airpoints™ Storeand Air New Zealand merchandise store, and at Nordstrom stores in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles and San Francisco. . .


Saturday soapbox

November 3, 2018

Saturday’s soapbox is yours to use as you will – within the bounds of decency and absence of defamation. You’re welcome to look back or forward, discuss issues of the moment, to pontificate, ponder or point us to something of interest, to educate, elucidate or entertain, amuse, bemuse or simply muse, but not abuse.

Image may contain: text

Read not to contradict and confute; nor to believe and take for granted; nor to find talk and discourse; but to weigh and consider – Francis Bacon


November 3 in history

November 3, 2018

39  – Lucan, Roman poet was born, (d. 65).

644   Umar ibn al-Khattab, the second Muslim caliph, was martyred by a Persian slave in Medina.

1468  Liège was sacked by Charles I of Burgundy’s troops.

1783  John Austin, a highwayman, was the last person to be publicly hanged at London’s Tyburn gallows.

1783   The American Continental Army was disbanded.

1793   French playwright, journalist and feminist Olympe de Gouges was guillotined.

1801  Karl Baedeker, German author and publisher, was born (d 1859).

1812   Napoleon’s armies were defeated at Vyazma.

1817   The Bank of Montreal, Canada’s oldest chartered bank, opened.

1838  The Times of India, the world’s largest circulated English language daily broadsheet newspaper was founded as The Bombay Times and Journal of Commerce.

1848   A greatly revised Dutch constitution, drafted by Johan Rudolf Thorbecke, severely limiting the powers of the Dutch monarchy, and strengthening the powers of parliament and ministers, was proclaimed.

1867   Garibaldi and his followers were defeated in the Battle of Mentanaand failed to end the Pope’s Temporal power in Rome.

1883    “Black Bart the poet” got away with his last stagecoach robbery, but left an incriminating clue that eventually led to his capture.

1886 Henry Reynolds launched his Anchor butter from a dairy factory at Pukekura, Waikato.

Birth of iconic Anchor butter brand

1886 – Manawatū rail link opened.

Manawatū rail link opened

1887   Coimbra Academic Association, the oldest students’ union in Portugal, was founded.

1900 – Adolf Dassler, German businessman who founded Adidas, was born (d. 1978).

1901 – Leopold III of Belgium was born (d. 1983).

1903   Panama separated from Colombia.

1908 – Giovanni Leone, Italian lawyer and politician, 6th President of Italy, was born (d. 2001).

1911  Chevrolet officially entered the automobile market in competition with the Ford Model T.

1913   The United States introduced an income tax.

1918  – Elizabeth P. Hoisington, American general, was born  (d. 2007).

1918   Austria-Hungary entered into an armistice with the Allies, and the Habsburg-ruled empire dissolves.

1918  Poland declared its independence from Russia.

1921  – Charles Bronson, American actor, was born (d. 2003).

1924  – Violetta Elvin, Russian ballerina, was born.

1930  Getúlio Dornelles Vargas became Head of the Provisional Government in Brazil after a bloodless coup.

1935   George II of Greece regained his throne through a popular plebiscite.

1942   Second Battle of El Alamein ended – German forces under Erwin Rommel were forced to retreat during the night.

1942  World War II: The Koli Point action began during the Guadalcanal Campaign.

1942 – Martin Cruz Smith, American author and screenwriter, was born.

1943   World War II: 500 aircraft of the U.S. 8th Air Force  devastated Wilhelmshafen harbour in Germany.

1944  World War II: Two supreme commanders of the Slovak National Uprising, Generals Ján Golian and Rudolf Viest were captured, tortured and later executed by German forces.

1948  Lulu, British actress and singer, was born.

1952 Roseanne Barr, American actress and comedian, was born.

1954  Adam Ant, English singer, was born.

1957  The Soviet Union launched Sputnik 2 with the first animal to enter orbit, a dog named Laika.

1964   Washington D.C. residents were able to vote in a presidential election for the first time.

1967   Vietnam War: The Battle of Dak To began.

1969  Vietnam War: U.S. President Richard M. Nixon addressed the nation on television and radio, asking the “silent majority” to join him in solidarity on the Vietnam War effort and to support his policies.

1973   NASA launched the Mariner 10 toward Mercury.

1974 – ‘Summer time’ reintroduced on trial basis.
'Summer time' reintroduced on trial basis

1978   Dominica gained independence from the United Kingdom.

1979   Greensboro massacre: Five members of the Communist Workers Party were shot dead and seven were wounded by a group of Klansmen and neo-Nazis during a “Death to the Klan” rally in Greensboro, North Carolina.

1982   The Salang tunnel fire in Afghanistan killed up to 2,000 people.

1986   Iran-Contra Affair: The Lebanese magazine Ash-Shiraa reported that the United States had been secretly selling weapons to Iran in order to secure the release of seven American hostages held by pro-Iranian groups in Lebanon.

1986   The Federated States of Micronesia gained independence from the United States.

1988    Tamil mercenaries tried to overthrow the Maldivian government.

1996   Death of Abdullah Çatlı, leader of the Turkish ultra-nationalist organisation Grey Wolves in the Susurluk car-crash.

2007  Pervez Musharraf declared emergency rule across Pakistan, suspending the Constitution, imposing a State of Emergency, and firing the chief justice of the Supreme Court.

2013 – A solar eclipse swept across Africa, Europe and the Eastern United States.

2014 – One World Trade Center officially opened.

2015 – Michelle Payne became the first female jockey to win the Melbourne Cup.

2016 – The Chicago Cubs defeated the Cleveland Indians in Game 7 of the 2016 World Series to earn their first title in 108 years; ending the then longest title drought in US sports history.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


%d bloggers like this: