365 days of gratitude

November 2, 2018

“Would you like some peonies?” a neighbour asked.

Would I? Yes please.

They were only just open this morning but are now almost fully in bloom.

Today I’m grateful for the gift of flowers.

 


Word of the day

November 2, 2018

Scaramouche – a stock character in commedia dell’arte and farce who is a cowardly braggart, easily beaten and frightened; a rascal or scamp.


Quote of the day

November 2, 2018

For twenty years I strove to free myself from what I retained of my education; I indulged my curiosity by reading books less to learn than to efface from my memory the ideas that had been thrust upon it.”
― 
Georges Sorel who was born not his day in 1847.


November 2 in history

November 2, 2018

619 – A qaghan of the Western Turkic Khaganate was assassinated in a Chinese palace by Eastern Turkic rivals after the approval of Tang emperor Gaozu.

1410 The Peace of Bicêtre between the Armagnac and Burgundian factions was signed.

1755 – Marie Antoinette, Queen of France was born (d. 1793).

1783  US General George Washington gave his “Farewell Address to the Army”.

1795 The French Directory succeeded the French National Convention as the government of Revolutionary France.

1847 – Georges Sorel, French philosopher and author, was born (d. 1922.

1861  American Civil War: Western Department Union General John C. Fremont was relieved of command and replaced by David Hunter.

1865 – Warren G. Harding, American journalist and politician, 29th President of the United States, was born (d. 1923).

1868  New Zealand officially adopted a  standard time to be observed nationally

1882 Oulu, Finland was decimated by the Great Oulu Fire of 1882.

1889  North and South Dakota were admitted as the 39th and 40th U.S. states.

1893 – Battista Farina, Italian businessman, founded the Pininfarina Company, was born (d. 1966).

1895  The first gasoline-powered race in the United States. First prize: $2,000

1898 Cheerleading started at the University of Minnesota with Johnny Campbell leading the crowd in cheering on the football team.

1899 The Boers began their 118 day siege of British held Ladysmith during the Second Boer War.

1913  Burt Lancaster, American actor, was born (d. 1994).

1914 Russia declared war on the Ottoman Empire.

1917 The Balfour Declaration proclaimed British support for the “establishment in Palestine of a national home for the Jewish people” with the clear understanding “that nothing shall be done which may prejudice the civil and religious rights of existing non-Jewish communities”

1920 KDKA of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania started broadcasting as the first commercial radio station. The first broadcast was the result of the U.S. presidential election, 1920.

1920 – Muhammad Rafiq Tarar, Pakistani judge and politician, 9th President of Pakistan, was born.

1930 Haile Selassie was crowned emperor of Ethiopia.

1936  The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation was established.

1936 – Italian dictator Benito Mussolini proclaimed the Rome-Berlin Axis, establishing the alliance of the Axis Powers.

1936 – The British Broadcasting Corporation initiated the BBC Television Service, the world’s first regular, high-definition (then defined as at least 200 lines) service.

1938 – Queen Sofia of Spain was born.

1941 Bruce Welch, English musician and songwriter (The Shadows), was born.

1942 At El Alamein in Egypt, the 2nd New Zealand Division opened the way for British armour, allowing the Allies to force a breakthrough and send the Axis forces into retreat.

NZ Division helps Allies break through at El Alamein

1944  Keith Emerson, British keyboardist and composer (Emerson, Lake & Palmer), was born.

1947  Howard Hughes performed the maiden (and only) flight of theSpruce Goose; the largest fixed-wing aircraft ever built.

1956 – Dale Brown, American author and pilot was born.

1957 The Levelland UFO Case in Levelland, Texas, generated national publicity.

1959 Quiz show scandals: Twenty One game show contestant Charles Van Doren admitted to a Congressional committee that he had been given questions and answers in advance.

1959  The first section of the M1 motorway, the first inter-urban motorway in the United Kingdom, was opened.

1960  Penguin Books was found not guilty of obscenity in the Lady Chatterley’s Lover case.

1961  k.d. lang, Canadian musician, was born.

1963  South Vietnamese President Ngô Ðình Diệm is assassinated following a military coup.

1964 King Saud of Saudi Arabia was deposed by a family coup, and replaced by his half-brother King Faisal.

1965  Norman Morrison, a 31-year-old Quaker, set himself on fire in front of the river entrance to the Pentagon to protest the use of napalm in the Vietnam war.

1966  The Cuban Adjustment Act entered force, allowing 123,000 Cubans the opportunity to apply for permanent residence in the United States.

1974  78 died when the Time Go-Go Club in Seoul burned down.

1983 U.S. President Ronald Reagan signed a bill creating Martin Luther King, Jr. Day.

1984  Velma Barfield became the first woman executed in the United States since 1962.

1988 The Morris worm, the first internet-distributed computer worm to gain significant mainstream media attention, was launched from MIT.

1995 – Former South African defence minister General Magnus Malan and 10 other former senior military officers were arrested and charged with murdering 13 black people in 1987.

2000 – The first resident crew to the ISS docked on the Soyuz TM-31.

2007 – 50,000–100,000 people demonstrated against the Georgian government in Tbilisi.

2014 – A suicide attack killed 60 at Wagah.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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