365 days of gratitude

October 22, 2018

When I was a child Labour Weekend was usually the time for the first swim of the season.

My family would pack a picnic, go to Gemmells* (or Gemmell’s at some sources) Crossing and my brothers and I would swim in the river.

More recently Labour Weekend hasn’t alway given us the weather for swimming – sometimes it’s given us a continuation of winter or only the promise of summer.

This year we’ve had more than a promise with temperatures in the early to mid 20s.

I didn’t have a swim but it’s been perfect weather for walking and relaxing and I’m grateful for it.

 


Word of the day

October 22, 2018

Driùchcainn – incision under one of the toes; chaffing between the toes caused by walking barefoot in warm sand; the feeling of walking barefoot across a beach with sun-warmed sand rubbing at your toes;.


Rural round-up

October 22, 2018

The business giving tourists a taste of the country – Sally Rae:

It is probably just as well that Laura Douglas has ditched her stiletto heels, given her days can include chasing errant pigs.

And while leading a runaway porker next to a state highway might draw a few odd glances from passing motorists, it is all in a day’s work for the self-confessed farm girl.

In a gutsy move, Miss Douglas (31) traded in a successful corporate career to establish an agri-tourism venture near Kingston in late 2016. In a major development for her fledgling business, Real Country recently confirmed a contract with international bus tour company Contiki to provide travellers with an authentic Southland farm experience.

Shares wobble as rules change – Hugh Stringleman:

Sharemarket high fliers A2 Milk and Synlait have lost considerable market value over the past month as investors try to make out the impact of forthcoming Chinese e-commerce regulations.

The prospects for both dairy companies run in tandem because Synlait produces most of A2 Milk’s infant formula and A2 now has a 17.4% stake in Synlait.

Both reported the doubling of sales and profits for the 2018 financial year when their share prices nudged $13 but A2 has since fallen to $10 and Synlait to $9. . . 

 

Butlers put berry farm up for sale – Chris Tobin:

Donald Butler (78) has spent most of his life growing berry fruit – strawberries especially – but now he and wife Jacky (76) have decided it’s time to step back.

The couple have placed their cafe and 11.95ha property at Hook, on State Highway 1 north of Waimate on the market, and will move to another property they own to run sheep.

Mr Butler has lived in the Hook area his entire life and has always been on a farm. ”My parents farmed on the Lower Hook Road and had 14 cows and apple orchards on a 40-acre [16ha] block. . .

Glysophate foes driven by hatred for Monsanto – Peter Griffin:

The NZ Environmental Protection Authority made the right call last week to leave glyphosate​ off a list of chemicals it will reassess to determine their risk to people and the environment.

In doing so, it resisted political pressure to put use of glyphosate-based weedkiller like Roundup in the spotlight. Associate Environment Minister and Green MP Eugenie Sage had wanted the EPA to consider classifying glyphosate as a hazardous chemical.

There’s a movement, particularly in Europe, to have glyphosate banned. . .

Property steeped in history on market for first time in over a century – Pat Deavoll and Rob Smith:

A historic farm near Culverden in North Canterbury is up for sale for the first time in 110 years.

PGG Wrightson real estate agent Bruce Hoban said that Mandamus Downs, owned by the Hammond family, had a “fine heritage” and was “held in high regard by North Canterbury farmers.”

“This is one of the Amuri Basin’s most admired grazing properties. It has an excellent scale, a good balance of hills, downs and flats, and has never been offered for sale before.” . . 

If we’re going to eat cattle let them eat grass – Jared Stone:

Stories about impending environmental apocalypse circulate almost daily, especially in drought-ravaged California. Many of these stories tend to blame agriculture — and specifically, beef — for gobbling up our resources. Though numbers vary widely and are hotly contested, some researchers estimate that it takes 1,800 gallons of water to produce each pound of beef.

The real problem, however, isn’t cattle. It’s industrial feedlots, where more than 70% of U.S. cattle eventually live.

In an industrial feedlot, potentially thousands of animals are packed together in an enclosure of bare, unproductive dirt. Nothing grows there. Operators have to bring in water for the cattle to drink, and for the enormous manure ponds that contain the cattle’s waste. But the majority of the water used in raising industrial cattle goes into growing their feed. These operations are tremendously resource-intensive. . .


Value for tax $s isn’t partisan

October 22, 2018

The Taxpayers’ Union is encouraging people to celebrate Labour Day by joining them:

 The Union’s Executive Director, Jordan Williams, says, “With the events of the last seven days seeing the Opposition distracted, and the Government using the opportunity to rule out tax relief for New Zealand workers, external pressure groups fighting to hold the Government to account are as important as ever.”

We are using this important day to step-up our efforts fighting for Lower Taxes, Less Waste, and More Transparency.”

Tax is by far the largest cost imposed on New Zealand workers and their families. Every dollar wasted by politicians and bureaucrats is one less for the hard working taxpayer who earned it.”

The Taxpayers’ Union relies on support by its members and subscribed supporters to fund its work. Becoming a supporter is free, with membership from as little as $5 at http://www.taxpayers.org.nz/join.

The NZTU is often described in the media as right wing it’s not, and working for lower taxes, less waste and more transparency is not politically partisan.

I don’t buy into the line that parties on the right of the political spectrum don’t care about the poor but parties on the left purport to champion them.

The poor have most to gain from lower taxes and less wasteful, more transparent governments.

Wealthy people don’t like higher taxes but they don’t have to worry about every dollar the way poor people do and every dollar taken in tax and wasted by government misspending is a dollar they need more.

The NZTU was launched when National was in power and held it to account. It is continuing to hold this government to account and that brings benefits to us all.

I joined the NZTU when it was launched and continue to support it as the only organisation that seeks to ensure better value for taxpayers’ money.


Back to what matters

October 22, 2018

The news that Jami-Less Ross has been taken into mental health care doesn’t answer the question I asked last week – is he mad, bad or both?

Nor does it excuse his behavior, but it does explain it.

Mental ill-health is serious. Continued  media attention won’t help him and could well hinder his recovery.

National can now return its focus to what matters – holding the government to account for the fall-out from bad policy, and developing better policy to offer the electorate.

It should also allow the media to focus on matters that matter such as the impact of high and rising fuel prices, the charade of the truncated select committee process on the ban on oil and gas exploration and the danger of virtue signaling environment policies that do harm rather than good.


Quote of the day

October 22, 2018

Life begets life. Energy creates energy. It is by spending oneself that one becomes rich. Sarah Bernhardt who was born on this day in 1844.


October 22 in history

October 22, 2018

362  A mysterious fire destroyed the temple of Apollo at Daphne outside Antioch.

1383  The 1383-1385 Crisis in Portugal: King Fernando diedwithout a male heir to the Portuguese throne, sparking a period of civil war and disorder.

1633 Battle of southern Fujian sea: The Ming dynasty defeated the Dutch East India Company.

1707 – Scilly naval disaster: four British Royal Navy ships ran aground near the Isles of Scilly because of faulty navigation. Admiral Sir Cloudesley Shovell and thousands of sailors drowned.

1730 Construction of the Ladoga Canal  completed.

1734  Daniel Boone, American pioneer and hunter, was born (d. 1820).

1746 The College of New Jersey (later renamed Princeton University) received its charter.

1784  Russia founded a colony on Kodiak Island, Alaska.

1790  Warriors of the Miami tribe under Chief Little Turtle defeated United States troops under General Josiah Harmar in the Northwest Indian War.

1797 André-Jacques Garnerin made the first recorded parachute jump 1,000 metres (3,200 feet) above Paris,.

1811 Franz Liszt, Hungarian pianist and composer, was born (d. 1886).

1836  Sam Houston was inaugurated as the first President of the Republic of Texas.

1844  The Great Anticipation: Millerites, followers of William Miller, anticipate the end of the world in conjunction with the Second Advent of Christ.

1844 – Sarah Bernhardt, French actress and manager, was born (d. 1923).

1875  First telegraphic connection in Argentina.

1877  The Blantyre mining disaster in Scotland killed 207 miners.

1878 The first rugby match under floodlights took place in Salford, between Broughton and Swinton.

1882 – N. C. Wyeth, American painter and illustrator was born (d. 1945).

1883 The Metropolitan Opera House in New York City opened with a performance of Gounod’s Faust.

1895  In Paris an express train overran a buffer stop and crossed more than 30 metres of concourse before plummeting through a window atGare Montparnasse.

1907  Panic of 1907: A run on the stock of the Knickerbocker Trust Company set events in motion that led to a depression.

1910  Dr. Crippen was convicted of poisoning his wife.

1919  Doris Lessing, British writer, Nobel Prize laureate, was born (d. 2013).

1924  Toastmasters International was founded.

1934 – Donald McIntyre, New Zealand opera singer, was born.

1934   Federal Bureau of Investigation agents shot and killed notorious bank robber Pretty Boy Floyd.

1941  French resistance member Guy Môquet and 29 other hostages were executed by the Germans in retaliation for the death of a German officer.

1943  World War II: in the Second firestorm raid on Germany, the Royal Air Force conducts an air raid on the town of Kassel, killing 10,000 and rendering 150,000 homeless.

1944  World War II: Battle of Aachen: The city of Aachen fell to American forces after three weeks of fighting, making it the first German city to fall to the Allies.

1946  Deepak Chopra, Indian-American physician and writer, was born.

1953  Laos gained independence from France

1957 Vietnam War: First United States casualties in Vietnam.

1960  Independence of Mali from France.

1962   Cuban Missile Crisis: US President John F. Kennedy, after internal counsel from Dwight D. Eisenhower, announced that American reconnaissance planes have discovered Soviet nuclear weapons in Cuba, and that he has ordered a naval “quarantine” of the Communist nation.

1963  A BAC One-Eleven prototype airliner crashed in UK with the loss of all on board.

1964  Jean-Paul Sartre was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature, but turned it down.

1964  A Multi-Party Parliamentary Committee selected the design which became the new official Flag of Canada.

1966  The Supremes became the first all-female music group to attain a No. 1 selling album (The Supremes A’ Go-Go).

1966  The Soviet Union launched Luna 12.

1967 – Denny Hulme became the first New Zealander to win the Formula One World Championship.

Denny Hulme wins Formula One title

1968  Apollo 7 safely splashed down in the Atlantic Ocean after orbiting the Earth 163 times.

1970  Tunku Abdul Rahman resigned as Prime Minister of Malaysia.

1972 Poet James K. Baxter died.
Death of poet James K. Baxter

1972 Vietnam War: In Saigon, Henry Kissinger and South Vietnamese President Nguyen Van Thieu met to discuss a proposed cease-fire.

1975  The Soviet unmanned space mission Venera 9 landed on Venus.

1976  Red Dye No. 4 was banned by the US Food and Drug Administration after it is discovered that it causes tumors in the bladders of dogs.

1981 The TGV railway service between Paris and Lyon was inaugurated.

1983  Two correctional officers are killed by inmates at the United States Penitentiary in Marion, Illinois. The incident inspires the Supermax model of prisons.

1991 Dimitrios Arhondonis, was elected 270th Archbishop of Constantinople, New Rome and Ecumenical Patriarch as Patriarch Bartholomew I of the Orthodox church.

1999  Maurice Papon, an official in the Vichy France government during World War II, was jailed for crimes against humanity.

2005  Tropical Storm Alpha formed in the Atlantic Basin, making the 2005 Atlantic Hurricane Season the most active Atlantic hurricane season on record with 22 named storms.

2006  A Panama Canal expansion proposal was approved by 77.8% of voters in a National referendum.

2007  Raid on Anuradhapura Air Force Base carried out by 21 Tamil Tiger commandos.

2008  India launched its first unmanned lunar mission Chandrayaan-1.

2013 – The Australian Capital Territory became the first Australian jurisdiction to legalize same-sex marriage with the Marriage Equality Legislation Australian Capital Territory, 2013.

2014  – Michael Zehaf-Bibeau attacked the Parliament of Canada in Ottawa, Canada, killing a soldier and injuring three other people.

2015 – A teacher and a student were killed, and 2 students injured, in an attack at a high school in Trollhättan, Sweden.

Sourced from NZ history Online & Wikipedia


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