Rural round-up

Nebraska trip all about irrigation– Yvonne O’Hara:

Ben Donaldson, of Cromwell, was one of a group of people to visit Nebraska to look at new technology and new ideas relating to irrigation.

The recent five-day trip was organised by Irrigation New Zealand and as well as farmers, there were irrigators, consultants and service industry representatives

In addition to visiting the Husker Harvest Days,  the world’s largest irrigated farm show, they  visited the University of Nebraska’s Water for Food Global Institute, research farms and research trials, irrigation schemes, natural resource districts, which manage water resources, and irrigation manufacturers. Mr Donaldson,  general manager (Southern) of Irrigation Services,  said he found the trip useful.

“For me the greatest learnings were around the nitrate levels in the water, education of the children in regards to agriculture and how the use of fertigation ties all of this together,” he said. . . 

Honey collectors will act as biosecurity buzzers – Neal Wallace:

New Zealand could be about to recruit millions of extra biosecurity officers who will pay for their work by supplying nectar and honey.

A $1 million Endeavour Fund grant to Otago University researchers aims to recruit honey bees as biosecurity monitors to detect and find noxious weeds.

Biochemistry research fellow Dr Andrew Cridge said the plan is to strategically site hives in areas where there are suspected to be unwanted plants.

Because the cost of DNA diagnostic testing has fallen so much, it makes it viable to analyse bee-collected pollen to see if unwanted plants are near the hives. . .

Hipsters pay for farm view – Tim Fulton:

South Island couple Genna and Alistair Bird have opened a door to a world of people wanting to soak up a panoramic view from their Tiny House on a hill. Tim Fulton reports.

Hipsters are getting to know The Grange and the open skies and plains of Canterbury. Genna and Alistair Bird run a 560ha sheep and beef farm near Ashley Gorge, just out of Oxford. . .

New Zealand avocado industry on track to bounce back from last year’s low volume season:

New Zealand Avocado growers are expecting volumes to be around 25 per cent higher than last season.

NZ Avocado Chief Executive Jen Scoular says the current season is a medium volume season, following on from a low volume season in 2017-18 and a record high volume season in the year prior.

“The season’s total harvest volume is forecast at 5.2million trays (5.5kg), of which 3.6million trays are forecast for export, accounting for around 60 per cent increase on the previous seasons export volumes,” she said. . . 

$434M sale of Wrightson’s seeds fair to minorities – Paul McBeth:

Danish cooperative DLF Seeds’ $434 million cash and debt bid to buy PGG Wrightson’s seeds unit is fair to minority shareholders, independent advisor KordaMentha says.

Wrightson’s 12,059 shareholders will vote on the deal at a combined annual and special meeting on Oct. 30 in Christchurch. The transaction needs 75 percent support to go ahead, meaning controlling shareholder Agria can’t force it through. . .

Get advice before burnoff:

Farmers are being urged to seek advice from rural fire officers before burning off standing vegetation or slash after a burn-off got out of control in Northland on Wednesday.

The landowner was intending to burn off about two hectares of standing gorse and logging waste on the Tinopai Peninsula, but the fire jumped a firebreak into more gorse and slash and eventually burnt through most of a 50 hectare block before stopping once it got to green pasture.

Fire and Emergency New Zealand Northland Deputy Principal Rural Fire Officer Rory Renwick said after jumping the firebreak the fire burnt rapidly along a ridge to where a digger was still in the process of building further fire breaks. . . 

Mastitis prevention and milking efficiency go hand in glove:

Udder health and milk quality are important to farm productivity and profitability. There’s a strong link between milking efficiency and preventing mastitis, while improving milking times will also improve milk quality, says mastitis expert and AgriHealth vet Dr Steve Cranefield.

Mastitis in New Zealand dairy cattle is our sector’s most common (and costly) disease. “Cows with healthy udders have less mastitis, produce more and are easier to milk,” says Steve. “Maintaining good teat skin condition is essential to reduce the chance of bacteria multiplying on the teats and getting into the udder. In addition, adopting good milking routines will help reduce the mastitis risk from teat end damage caused by over-milking.” . .

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