365 days of gratitude

07/09/2018

I know of no single formula for success. But over the years I have observed that some attributes of leadership are universal and are often about finding ways of encouraging people to combine their efforts, their talents, their insights, their enthusiasm and their inspiration to work together. –  Queen Elizabeth II

This ability to encourage people to co-operate is one of the qualities that make the world a much better place.

I’m blessed to know lots of people who do it in big ways and small and I’m grateful for it.


Word of the day

07/09/2018

Connotative – the act or process of connoting or tending to connote; aidea or meaning suggested by or associated with a word or thing; signifying or suggestive of an associative or secondary meaning; the set of associations implied by a word in addition to its literal meaning.


Lying by omission

07/09/2018

Remember Jacinda Ardern saying in a pre-elections debate she wouldn’t lie?

What would she call this?

Jacinda Ardern insisted in an interview today that she would not fire Clare Curran – but the Prime Minister had accepted the errant MP’s resignation the night before.

The under-fire Curran has quit as a minister, saying the pressure on her had become “intolerable”. She becomes the first casualty in the Ardern administration.

Ardern told Newstalk ZB’s Chris Lynch – in an interview recorded at 8am this morning – that she would not fire Curran.

But it has now emerged the errant minister told Ardern last night that she would quit – and Ardern accepted her resignation.

When asked by reporters in Gisborne today about her comment to Newstalk ZB, Ardern said: “The question that I was asked this morning was whether I’d asked her to resign, and the answer was no.” . . .

Courts require people to swear to tell the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth.

Omitting to tell the whole truth isn’t lying by commission but it is lying by omission.

And it was unnecessary.

The resignation was given, and accepted, last night, giving plenty of time for anyone who needed to know before the public knew to be told.

Delaying the announcement was poor political management that led the PM to knowingly mislead the public and seriously contradicts the government’s aim to be open and transparent.


Minister down

07/09/2018

The Labour NZ First Green government has lost its first minister:

Embattled Dunedin South MP Clare Curran has resigned as Minister, saying the pressure on her has become “intolerable”.

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern announced just after midday today she had accepted Ms Curran’s resignation after two failures to properly record meetings and this week’s stumbled response in Parliament to questions about her personal use of email. . .

The pressure was of her own making.

To do the wrong thing once might be considered a mistake that might, if one was being charitable, be blamed on inexperience. Although, charitable or not, when it cost a senior public servant her job it was a very big mistake.

To do the same wrong thing twice can’t be blamed on inexperience, it’s a sign of serious incompetence and no government can afford incompetent ministers.


Rural round-up

07/09/2018

Noisy opposition to dams will leave us short of water – Andrew Curtis:

A few days after a vote to build the Waimea Community Dam was narrowly lost at a Tasman District Council meeting the response from politicians, a number of councillors and many around the country, seems to be shock.

The effects will kick in immediately as a plan change which requires Waimea River flows to be raised, drafted on the assumption the dam would go ahead, will mean water restrictions will be enforced in the district this summer.

In Auckland, both Watercare and the region’s vegetable growers take water from the Waikato River. With the region’s population booming, future conflict over water is also on the horizon. Decisions made at a local level, where a noisy opposition may be focused solely on their rates bill, have wider impacts on regions and in fact the whole country. . .

Take the credit – Sonita Chandar:

Young South Taranaki couple Owen Clegg and Hollie Wham do things a lot better than they expected. Sonita Chandar reports and how they are running their farm.

South Taranaki farmers Owen Clegg, 26, and Hollie Wham, 25, are a young couple who, despite achieving great things in the industry, give themselves little credit.

Earlier this year they won the 2018 Taranaki Dairy Industry Awards Share Farmer of the Year title. They also won the Honda Farm Safety and Health Award, Ravensdown Pasture Performance Award and the Westpac Business Performance Award. . .

Meat farmers should expand – Neal Wallace:

One of Europe’s largest buyers of New Zealand red meat is urging farmers to expand their flocks and herds.

Alexander Eyckeler said demand is growing for quality cuts of NZ lamb and venison, the reason prices have steadily risen in the last three years.

“My clear message not only for sheep meat farmers but also venison farmers, you have incentives to build up your herds again.”

Eyckeler is one of Alliance Group’s largest lamb, mutton and venison customers, supplying retail and food service markets throughout Europe. . .

Otago merino making mark in space – Yvonne O’Hara:

Merino wool from Central Otago sheep has made it into space, taken part in military operations, fought wild fires and protected extreme endurance athletes.

Outer and undergarments using fabric made from New Zealand, and more specifically Central Otago merino wool, are manufactured and sold in 36 countries by Armadillo Merino, a UK-based company.

Company founder Andy Caughey said their merino wool garments were being used by professional risk takers, including special forces and elite police teams and by International Space Station (ISS) astronauts ”because of the multi-attribute properties of merino wool”.

”Armadillo has also supplied base garments to the Washington DC Park Police Department, which provide public security protection for President Trump and his presidential motorcade,” he said. . .

’M bovis’ hampering free meal – Margaret Phillips:

A reluctance to visit dairy farms in order to reduce the risk of spreading Mycoplasma bovis has dealt a blow to a service dishing up free meals for migrant workers.

Volunteers normally visited 10 to 20 farms each week to invite mostly migrant workers to the community meals put on in Riversdale during the busy lambing and calving season.

Organised by the Riversdale-Waikaia Presbyterian Church, the free weekly meals have in past years attracted about 80 people at the seasonal peak.

But the numbers had dropped drastically, church pastor John Gullick said . .

Ditch the almond milk: why everything you know about sustainable eating is probably wrong – Tony Naylor:

In food and drink, we all want to do the right thing. We want to shop and eat sustainably. But, sometimes, it is easier said than done. Our willingness to jump on the latest eco-trends and unquestioningly accept reassuring labelling can lead to unintended consequences. If we are serious about eating green, we need to read beyond the headlines and think rigorously about how we apply ethical advice in our own lives. By way of inspiration, here are some of the ways we get it wrong on ingredients, storage and recycling – and a few surprisingly easy solutions.

Is almond milk really the nuts?

Influenced by clean eating and agri-exposés such as Cowspiracy(whichpointed to methane emissions from cattle as crucial in global warming), many are ditching cows’ milk in favour of non-dairy alternatives, which, according to Euromonitor, now make-up 12% of global milk sales. . .


Paying more getting less

07/09/2018

Petrol in Palmerston North on Tuesday cost $2.11 a litre.

In Kurow on Wednesday it was $2.30.

That’s hard to stomach when the four-lane highway that was planned for the very busy Christchurch to Ashburton section of State Highway 1 has been canned.

A little bit of the extra we’re paying is a result of higher prices for crude oil and the lower New Zealand dollar.

A lot of it is tax.

We’re paying more and getting less.

 


Quote of the day

07/09/2018

The aim of flattery is to soothe and encourage us by assuring us of the truth of an opinion we have already formed about ourselves. Edith Sitwell who was born on this day in 1887.


September 7 in history

07/09/2018

1191 Third Crusade: Battle of Arsuf – Richard I of England defeated Saladin at Arsuf.

1524 Thomas Erastus, Swiss theologian, was born (d. 1583).

1533 Queen Elizabeth I, was born (d. 1603).

1652 Around 15,000 Han farmers and militia rebelled against Dutch rule on Taiwan.

1776  World’s first submarine attack: the American submersible craftTurtleattempted to attach a time bomb to the hull of British AdmirlRichard Howe’s flagship HMS Eagle in New York Harbour.

1812 Napoleonic Wars: Battle of Borodino – Napoleon defeated the Russian army of Alexander I near the village of Borodino.

1818 Carl III of Sweden-Norway is crowned king of Norway.

1819 Thomas A. Hendricks, 21st Vice President of the United States, was born (d. 1885).

1821 The Republic of Gran Colombia was established, with Simón Bolívaras the founding President and Francisco de Paula Santander as vice president.

1822 Dom Pedro I declared Brazil independent from Portugal.

1860 Grandma Moses, American painter, ws born (d. 1961).

1860 Steamship Lady Elgin sank on Lake Michigan, with the loss of around 400 lives.

1862 Sir Edgar Speyer, American-born British financier and philanthropist, was born (d. 1932).

1867  J. P. Morgan, Jr., American banker and philanthropist, was born (d. 1943).

1868 Prussian soldier of fortune Gustavus Ferdinand von Tempsky was killed during the assault on Titokowaru’s pa in south Taranaki.

Von Tempsky killed at Te Ngutu-o-te-manu

1876 – C. J. Dennis, Australian poet and author, was born (d. 1938).

1887 Edith Sitwell, British poet and critic, was born (d. 1964).

1893  The Genoa Cricket & Athletic Club, to become the first Italian football club, was established by British expats.

1895  The first game of what would become known as rugby league was played, in England, starting the 1895-96 Northern Rugby Football Union season.

1901 The Boxer Rebellion in China officially ended with the signing of the Boxer Protocol.

1903 – Margaret Landon, American missionary and author, was born (d. 1993)

1903 – Dorothy Marie Donnelly, American poet and author, was born (d. 1994)

1906 Alberto Santos-Dumont flew his 14-bis aircraft at Bagatelle, France for the first time successfully.

1907 Cunard Line’s RMS Lusitania set sail on her maiden voyage from Liverpool, England to New York City.

1909 – New Zealand’s heaviest gold nugget was found by Messrs Scott and Sharpe at Ross on the West Coast.

1909  Eugene Lefebvre (1878–1909), while test piloting a new French-built Wright biplane, crashed at Juvisy France. He died, becoming the first ‘pilot’ in the world to lose his life in a powered heavier-than-air craft.

1911 French poet Guillaume Apollinaire was arrested and put in jail on suspicion of stealing the Mona Lisa from the Louvre museum.

1913 Anthony Quayle, British actor and director, was born (d. 1989).

1916 Federal employees won the right to Workers’ compensationby(Federal Employers Liability Act (39 Stat. 742; 5 U.S.C. 751).

1917 – Ewen Solon, New Zealand-English actor, was born (d. 1985).

Actor Ewen Solon.jpg

1920 Two newly purchased Savoia flying boats crashed in the Swiss Alps en-route to Finland where killing both crews.

1921 – The NZ Maori  team played the Springboks for the first time.

1921 The first Miss America Pageant, a two-day event, was held.

1922 Independence of Aydin, from Greek occupation.

1925 Laura Ashley, British designer, was born (d. 1985).

1927 Eric Hill, British children’s author, was born (d. 2014).

1927  The first fully electronic television system was achieved by Philo Taylor Farnsworth.

1929  Steamer Kuru capsized and sank on Lake Näsijärvi, Finland with 136 lives lost.

1932  – Malcolm Bradbury, English author and academic, was born (d. 2000).

1932 – John Paul Getty, Jr., American-English philanthropist and book collector, was born (d. 2003)

1936 The last surviving member of the thylacine species, Benjamin, died alone in her cage at the Hobart Zoo.

1936 Buddy Holly, American singer (The Crickets), was born (d. 1959).

1940   The Blitz – Nazi Germany began to rain bombs on London, the first of 57 consecutive nights of bombing.

1940 Treaty of Craiova: Romania lost Southern Dobrudja to Bulgaria.

1942  8,700 Jews of Kolomyia (western Ukraine) sent by German Gestapo to death camp in Belzec.

1942  First flight of the Consolidated B-32 Dominator.

1943  A fire at the Gulf Hotel in Houston, Texas, killed 55 people.

1945  Japanese forces on Wake Island, which they had held since December of 1941, surrendered to U.S. Marines.

1949 Gloria Gaynor, American singer, was born.

1951 Chrissie Hynde, American guitarist and singer (The Pretenders), was born.

1953 – Marc Hunter, New Zealand singer-songwriter, was born (d. 1998).

1953 Nikita Khrushchev was elected first secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union.

1957 Jermaine Stewart, American pop singer (Shalamar and Culture Club), was born (d. 1997).

1970 – Bill Shoemaker set record for most lifetime wins as a jockey (passing Johnny Longden).

1977 The Torrijos-Carter Treaties between Panama and the United States on the status of the Panama Canal were signed.

1978  While walking across Waterloo Bridge in London BulgariandissidentGeorgi Markov was assassinated by Bulgarian secret police agent Francesco Giullino by means of a ricin pellet fired from in a specially-designed umbrella.

1978 British Prime Minister James Callaghan announced that he would not call a general election for October, considered to be a major political blunder.

1979 The Entertainment and Sports Programming Network, ESPN, made its debut.

1979 – The Chrysler Corporation asked the United States government for USD $1.5 billion to avoid bankruptcy.

1986  Desmond Tutu became the first black man to lead the Anglican Church in South Africa.

1986  Gen. Augusto Pinochet, president of Chile, escaped attempted assassination.

1988 Abdul Ahad Mohmand, the first Afghan in space, returned aboard the Soviet spacecraft Soyuz TM-5 after 9 days on the Mir space station.

1999 A 5.9 magnitude earthquake rocked Athens, rupturing a previously unknown fault, killing 143, injuring more than 500, and leaving 50,000 people homeless.

2004 Hurricane Ivan, a Category 5 hurricane hit Grenada, killing 39 and damaging 90% of its buildings.

2005 First presidential election was held in Egypt.

2008  The US Government took control of the two largest mortgage financing companies in the US, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.

2010 – A Chinese fishing trawler collided with two Japanese Coast Guard patrol boats in disputed waters near the islands. The collisions occurred around 10am, after the Japanese Coast Guard ordered the trawler to leave the area. After the collisions, Japanese sailors boarded the Chinese vessel and arrested the captain, Zhan Qixiong.

2011 – A plane crash in Russia killed 43 people, including nearly the entire roster of the Lokomotiv Yaroslavl Kontinental Hockey League team.

2012 – Canada officially cut diplomatic ties with Iran by closing its embassy in Tehran and ordered the expulsion of Iranian diplomats from Ottawa, over support for Syria, nuclear plans and alleged rights abuses.

2013 – The Liberal Party of Australia led by Tony Abbott won the Australian federal election, 2013.

2017 – The 8.2 Mw 2017 Chiapas earthquake struck southern Mexico killing at least 60 people.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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