365 days of gratitude

July 20, 2018

“Look, the ocean,” my passenger exclaimed.

I looked and saw the sea I see every time I drive into town.

But my passenger was from Idaho and the ocean was a long, long way from home.

The proximity to the sea is something we Kiwis, none of whom are more than a couple of hundred kilometres from the coast, take for granted.

But when I go to town now, I remember my passenger’s excitement and look at the sea with fresh eyes.

 

Today I’m grateful for the sea and it’s proximity.


Word of the day

July 20, 2018

Propinquity – the state of being close to or near someone or something; nearness in place or time; proximity; nearness of blood; close kinship; a similarity in nature between people or things;


Rural round-up

July 20, 2018

Red Meat group shares knowledge – Sally Rae:

With a relatively new farming business, Dunback couple Scott and Nadine Tomlinson were keen to surround themselves with some key people.

So they joined an Otago-based Red Meat Profit Partnership Action Network group made up of nine farming couples.

Last week, the group held its second meeting at Barewood Station, a Lone Star Farms-owned property between Outram and Middlemarch. The focus was on body condition scoring and parasite management.

The RMPP Action Network aimed to help farmers put their ideas into action on-farm. Essentially, a group of farmers identified a problem and, with the help of experts, worked together to come up with a solution . .

Wairoa set to tap into  ‘hops hemp horticulture’ production – John Boynton:

Could Wairoa become the next foodbowl of New Zealand?

The Poutama Trust, a Māori business development service, is working with a Māori land trust in Wairoa to untap the potential for food production.

Paroa Trust chairman Luis McDonnell said the organisation was working toward a hops trial. . .

Young Farmer involvement ultimate win-win – Sally Rae:

Emma Sutherland has given a lot to Young Farmers and it has given her a lot back – including a husband.

Mrs Sutherland (31), a member of the Clinton club, was recognised for her service at the organisation’s recent national awards evening in Invercargill.

It was a stellar week for the Otago-Southland region; as well as Mrs Sutherland’s success, Brooke Flett won the stock judging and Otago-Southland won best region in New Zealand. . .

LIC’s FY net profit tumbles on one-offs but revenue reaches record -Rebecca Howard:

(BusinessDesk) – Livestock Improvement Corp, the dairy herd genetics cooperative, reported a 55 percent drop in full-year net profit on higher restructuring costs but was upbeat about the current year as those costs will no longer be incurred.

Net profit for the year to May 31 was $9.3 million versus $20.8 million, the Hamilton-based company said in a statement. Reported earnings before interest and taxation were $14.9 million, also down 54 percent. In both cases, the result was weighed by one-off transformation costs and the annual revaluation of the biological bull team. However, stripping out those costs ebit was $27 million versus $20.7 million in the same period a year earlier, it said. . .

Pāmu updates full year EBITDAR forecast:

Landcorp Faming Limited (Pāmu) has released an updated EBITDAR (Earnings before Interest, Taxes, Depreciation, Amortization and Revaluations) forecast for the 2017/18 financial year.

Previous advice from Pāmu at the time it released its half-year result was an estimated EBITDAR of between $33 and $38 million for the full year. This has now been revised up to an estimated EBITDAR of between $47 – $52 million. . .

Woodville farmer first woman elected head of Young Farmer competition  –  Paul Mitchell:

A Woodville farmer is proud to be the new head organiser of one of New Zealand’s most prestigious farming competitions, and part of the new wave of women joining the New Zealand Young Farmers’ Board.

Rebecca Brown was elected chairwoman of the FMG Young Farmer of the Year committee last week. She is the first woman to hold the role in the contest’s 50-year history.

“I’m really honoured. It’s a cool feeling and shows that women can do anything” . .

Two new feed ingredient peas:

Plant Research (NZ) Ltd, a privately-owned plant breeding and research company based in Christchurch New Zealand, has released two new field pea varieties designed for the emerging pea ingredients market.

The use of field peas for producing a wide range of new foods is increasing rapidly globally. Plant Research (NZ) Ltd together with it’s USA based breeding partner have been working for 10 years to develop the two new varieties. Both companies have linkages with major feed ingredient companies who are helping to understand key traits that are important for fractionation and ingredients for different products. . . 

Farmed insects could provide feed for livestock – Paula Park:

Common house flies (Musca domestica) may be a cheap and sustainable source of feed for farm animals, according to a scientist and an entrepreneur.

The flies, whose larvae can be bred, nurtured and ground into granules, provide roughly the same amount of edible protein as fish meal and other widely used protein sources, said entrepreneur Jason Drew.  

Drew’s book, The Story of the Fly and How it Could Save the World, launched in London, United Kingdom, last week, argues that the insect’s larvae should be farmed commercially to provide protein for farmed fish and animals to feed the world’s growing population.   . .

 

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Electronic voting is a bad idea

July 20, 2018

Think electronic voting is a good idea?

Watch this and think again.

Hat tip: Utopia


Political blood stronger than water

July 20, 2018

Bryce Edwards asks, where are the protests over the government’s new submarine killers?

He might also ask where are the protests against the CTPPP?

He could also ask where are the protests against the decision to pull back from putting cameras on fishing boats?

The answer is that political blood is stronger than water.

Those who would protest against the new planes, and the CTPPP are more likely to be supporters of one or other of the parties in government.

While concern for sustainable fishing crosses political boundaries, people on the left tend to be more likely to protest and having their party in government is keeping Green supporters quiet.

Those opposing these policies might be moved to protest if they had  been promoted by a National-led government but accept, or at least don’t protest against, actions of their own side.

This isn’t confined to any particular spot on the political spectrum.

I wasn’t enamoured of everything the government did from 2008 until last year, but I accepted the reality of politics, and life.

You can’t always get everything you want and my loyalty to National and support for most of what the government it led me did was sufficient for me to keep quiet about the rest.

The rank and file of the Green Party are the ones most likely to find tkeeping quiet difficult. Some members revolted when Environment Minister Eugenie Sage signed off the expansion of a Chinese-owned water bottling plant.

But just as parties need to swallow a few dead rats to get into government, their members have to put up with their MPs not doing everything they want, or doing some things they don’t, when they get there.

As long as the political blood stays thick, party unity will stay strong. It’s when it starts getting watered down, or spilt, that a party, and the government it’s part of, will be wounded.


Quote of the day

July 20, 2018

If you cannot understand that there is something in man which responds to the challenge of this mountain and goes out to meet it, that the struggle is the struggle of life itself upward and forever upward, then you won’t see why we go. Sir Edmund Hillary  who was born on this day in 1919.


July 20 in history

July 20, 2018

356 BC  – Alexander the Great, Macedonean king and conqueror of Persia, was born (d. 323 BC).

70 –  Siege of Jerusalem: Titus, son of emperor Vespasian, stormed theFortress of Antonia. The Roman army was drawn into street fights with the Zealots.

911 Rollo laid siege to Chartres.

1304 Wars of Scottish Independence: Fall of Stirling Castle – King Edward I  took the stronghold using the War Wolf.

1402  Ottoman-Timurid Wars: Battle of Ankara – Timur, ruler of Timurid Empire, defeated forces of the Ottoman Empire sultan Bayezid I.

1656  Swedish forces under the command of King Charles X Gustav defeated the forces of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth at the Battle of Warsaw.

1712 Riot Act took effect in Great Britain.

1738  French explorer Pierre Gaultier de Varennes et de la Vérendrye reached the western shore of Lake Michigan.

1810 Citizens of BogotáNew Granada declared independence from Spain.

1822 Gregor Mendel, German scientist, father of modern genetics, was born (d. 1884).

1864 American Civil War: Battle of Peachtree Creek – Confederate forces led by General John Bell Hood unsuccessfully attacked Union troops under General William T. Sherman.

1866 Austro-Prussian War: Battle of Lissa – The Austrian Navy , led by Admiral Wilhelm von Tegetthoff, defeated the Italian Navy.

1881 Indian Wars:Sioux Chief Sitting Bull led the last of his fugitive people in surrender to United States troops at Fort Buford, North Dakota.

1885  The Football Association legalised professionalism in football under pressure from the British Football Association.

1892 – The Wellington and Manawatu Railway (WMR) Company’s locomotive No. 10 established a world speed record for the narrow 3 foot 6 inch (1067 mm) gauge, averaging 68 km per hour on a two-hour run and hitting a peak speed of 103 kph.

1893 George Llewelyn-Davies, English Peter Pan character model, was born (d. 1915).

1898  Spanish-American War: A boiler exploded on the USS Iowa off the coast of Santiago de Cuba.

1902 Jimmy Kennedy, Irish composer, was born (d. 1984).

1903 Ford Motor Company shipped its first car.

1917  World War I: The Corfu Declaration, which led to the creation of the post-war Kingdom of Yugoslavia, was signed by the Yugoslav Committee and Kingdom of Serbia.

1918  Cindy Walker, American singer, was born (d. 2006).

1919  Sir Edmund Hillary, New Zealand mountaineer and explorer, was born (d. 2008).

1921 – Congresswoman Alice Mary Robertson became the first woman to preside over the US House of Representatives.

1922 The League of Nations awarded mandates of Togoland to France andTanganyika to the United Kingdom.

1924  Teheran, Persia came under martial law after the American vice-consul, Robert Imbrie, was killed by a religious mob enraged by rumors he had poisoned a fountain and killed several people.

1925  Jacques Delors, French President of the European Commission, was born.

1926 A convention of the Southern Methodist Church voted to allow women to become priests.

1928 The government of Hungary issued a decree ordering Gypsies to end their nomadic ways, settle permanently in one place, and subject themselves to the same laws and taxes as other Hungarians.

1930 Sally Ann Howes, English-born singer and actress, was born.

1932  In Washington, D.C., police fired tear gas on World War I veterans part of the Bonus Expeditionary Force, who attempted to march to the White House.

1932  Crowds in the capitals of Bolivia and Paraguay demanded their governments declare war on the other after fighting on their border.

1933 Buddy Knox, American singer and songwriter, was born (d. 1999).

1933  Vice-Chancellor of Germany Franz von Papen and Vatican CardinalEugenio Pacelli sign a concordat on behalf of their respective nations.

1933  In London, 500,000 marched against anti-Semitism.

1933  Two-hundred Jewish merchants were arrested in Nuremberg and paraded through the streets.

1934  Police in Minneapolis fired upon striking truck drivers, during theMinneapolis Teamsters Strike of 1934, killing two and wounding sixty-seven; Seattle police fired tear gas on and club 2,000 striking longshoremen, and the governor of Oregon called out the National Guard to break a strike on the Portland docks.

1935  A Royal Dutch Airlines plane en route from Milan to Frankfurt crashed into a Swiss mountain, killing 13.

1936 The Montreux Convention was signed in Switzerland, authorising Turkey to fortify the Dardanelles and Bosphorus but guaranteeing free passage to ships of all nations in peacetime.

1938 –  Dame Diana Rigg, English actress, was born.

1938 Natalie Wood, American actress, was born (d. 1981).

1940 – U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Hatch Act of 1939, limiting political activity by Federal government employees.

1941 Soviet leader Joseph Stalin consolidated the Commissariats of Home Affairs and National Security to form the NKVD and named Lavrenti Beria its chief.

1942  World War II: The first unit of the Women’s Army Corps began training in Des Moines, Iowa.

1943  Chris Amon, New Zealand racing driver

AmonChris19730706.jpg

1943  Wendy Richard, English actress (d.2009).

1944   World War II: Adolf Hitler survived an assassination attempt (known as the July 20 plot) led by German Army Colonel Claus von Stauffenberg.

1944  Franklin D. Roosevelt won the Democratic Party nomination for the fourth and final time at the 1944 Democratic National Convention.

1944   Fifty people were hurt in rioting in front of the presidential palaceinMexico City.

1944 Attempt to assassinate Adolf Hitler at his Rastenberg headquarters as part of Operation Valkyrie.

1945 John Lodge, English musician (The Moody Blues), was born.

1945 The US Congress approved the Bretton Woods Agreement.

1947  Police in Burma arrested former Prime Minister U Saw and 19 others on charges of assassinating Prime Minister U Aung San and seven members of his cabinet.

1948  U.S. President Harry S. Truman issued a peacetime military draft amid increasing tensions with the Soviet Union.

1948 Twelve leaders of the Communist Party USA were indicted under theSmith Act including William Z. Foster and Gus Hall.

1949 Israel and Syria signed a truce to end their nineteen-month war.

1950 Cold War: In Philadelphia, Harry Gold pleaded guilty to spying for the Soviet Union by passing secrets from atomic scientist Klaus Fuchs.

1951  King Abdullah I of Jordan was assassinated.

1953 Dave Evans, Australian singer (AC/DC), was born.

1953 Marcia Hines, American-born Australian singer, was born.

1954  Otto John, head of West Germany’s secret service, defected to East Germany.

1955 Jem Finer, English musician and composer (The Pogues), was born.

1958 Mick MacNeil, Scottish musician (Simple Minds), was born.

1959  The Organization for European Economic Cooperation admitted Spain.

1960 Ceylon elected Sirimavo Bandaranaike Prime Minister, the world’s first elected female head of government.

1960 – The Polaris missile was successfully launched from a submarine, the USS George Washington, for the first time.

1961  French military forces broke the Tunisian siege of Bizerte.

1964 Vietnam War: Viet Cong forces attacked the capital of Dinh Tuong Province, Cai Be, killing 11 South Vietnamese military personnel and 40 civilians (30 of whom were children).

1964 – The National Movement of the Revolution was instituted as the sole legal political party in the Republic of Congo.

1965 – Riots at Mt Eden prison followed a botched escape attempt and lasted into the next day.

1968  Special Olympics founded.

1969 Apollo Program: Apollo 11 successfully landed on the Moon.

1969 – A cease fire was announced between Honduras and El Salvador, 6 days after the beginning of the “Football War

1974 Turkish occupation of Cyprus: Forces from Turkey invaded Cyprus after a “coup d’ etat”, organised by the dictator of Greece, against president Makarios.

1976  The Viking 1 lander successfully landed on Mars.

1982   The Provisional IRA detonated two bombs in Hyde Park and Regents Park killing eight soldiers, wounding forty-seven people, and leading to the deaths of seven horses.

1984 Officials of the Miss America pageant asked Vanessa Lynn Williamsto quit after Penthouse published nude photos of her.

1985  The government of Aruba passed legislation to secede from the Netherlands Antilles.

1989 – Burma’s ruling junta put opposition leader Daw Aung San Suu Kyiunder house arrest.

1992 Václav Havel resigned as president of Czechoslovakia.

1997  – The fully restored USS Constitution (a.k.a. Old Ironsides) celebrated its 200th birthday by setting sail for the first time in 116 years.

1999 Falun Gong was banned in China, and a large scale crackdown of the practice is launched.

2012 – During a midnight showing of The Dark Knight Rises, a gunmanopened fire at a movie theatre in Aurora, Colorado, killing 12 people and injuring 58.

2013 – Seventeen government soldiers were killed in an attack by FARC revolutionaries in the Colombian department of Arauca.

2015 – A huge explosion in the mostly Kurdish border town of Suruç, Turkey, targeting The Socialist Youth Associations Federation, killed at least 31 people and injured more than 100.

2015 – The United States and Cuba resumed full diplomatic relationsafter five decades.

2017  – O. J. Simpson was granted parole to be released from prison after serving nine years of a 33-year sentence after being convicted of armed robbery.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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