365 days of gratitude

July 14, 2018

When she first got an automatic washing machine, her sister-in-law asked what she was going to do with all the spare time she’d have.

I said I hoped she’d told her she’d be sitting down with a good book.

She didn’t but said it didn’t take long for her days to fill up and her to wonder how she’d ever had time to do everything else when she’d had to deal with her old wringer washing machine.

It reminded me of reading somewhere that the washing machine was  the single most important invention that enabled women to stay in or rejoin the paid workforce.

It also reminded me to be grateful for my washing machine and the time it frees for me that was only enjoyed by mother after my brothers and I left home and that her mother never had.


Word of the day

July 14, 2018

Terf –  trans-exclusionary/ eliminationist/exterminationist radical feminist.

Hat tip: Karl du Fresne


Saturday’s smiles

July 14, 2018

Newton, Pascal and Archimedes are playing hide and seek.

Archimedes starts to count, Pascal hides in a bush, and Newton draws a square on the ground and steps into it.

Archimedes finds Newton first, of course, but Newton replies, “Nope. One Newton on one square meter is equal to one Pascal.”

An interesting aspect to humour is that I don’t understand the science but I still get the joke.

 


Rural round-up

July 14, 2018

Good times are here – Annette Scott:

It’s been a long time coming but sheep farming is where it should be, Federated Farmers meat and fibre chairman Miles Anderson says.

With winter schedules knocking on the door of $8, global markets largely continuing to track along at the solid pace of recent months and global inventories remaining low it’s a good time to be a sheep farmer, he said.

Confidence at the farmgate in sheep is strongest since 2011. . .

Get picky when buying stock – Glenys Christian:

More than 150 farmers at a Mycoplasma bovis meeting in Dargaville were told to choose their breeder rather than their bull.

“You need to ask some very strong questions,” Chris Biddles, who established Te Atarangi Angus stud on the nearby Pouto Peninsula over 30 years ago, said.

Firstly, farmers looking for service bulls for their herds should choose a breeder with a registered herd. . .

Tractor sales could reach record high :

Tractor and machinery sales could hit a record high by the end of the year, even though rural customers are exercising caution, says an industry body.

Sales of tractors are up more than 25 per cent on this time last year and all sectors are showing buoyancy, said new NZ Tractor and Machinery Association president John Tulloch.

Year-to-date figures to the end of June showed a total of 1876 sales across all HP categories compared with 1448 in 2017: a total increase of 26.1 per cent. . .

Mycoplasma bovis: supposed facts don’t add up – Keith Woodford:

[With the re-organisation of the New Zealand rural media and the demise of NZ Farmer for which I previously wrote, this is the first of a new series of fortnightly articles I will be writing for Farmers Weekly and also published at http://www.interest.co.nz. Whereas my articles in Stuff  (online and in their hardcopy newspapers ) are about rural issues, but largely for an urban audience, the Farmers Weekly articles are primarily for farmers and those more directly involved in rural matters.]

A key message from the Ministry of Primary Industries (MPI) has been “generally prolonged or repeated contact with infected animals is required for the disease to be transmitted” (MPI website). Another key message has been that the disease has only been here since the end of 2015. . . .

One week left to influence emissions bill:

Farmers have just one week left to submit their opinions on the Zero Carbon Bill. Climate change ambassadors for the dairy sector are urging farmers to have their say on the new 2050 emissions target the bill will set in place.

The government is asking for public feedback on three possible 2050 emission reduction targets.

DairyNZ and many other primary sector organisations are supportive of a new target which will reduce carbon emissions to net zero, and stabilise methane emissions. This is an option dairy farmers can support by submitting online. . .

Motor Industry Association calls for new safety rules for ATV operators – Olivia Fairhusrt:

The Motor Industry Association (MIA) is calling for mandatory safety rules for the use of quad bikes and small utility vehicles in the workplace, after several coronial inquests.

The inquests revealed new rules would reduce serious injuries and fatalities, which prompted the call to the Minister of Workplace Relations and Safety for compulsory regulations.

The association called for helmets to be made compulsory, children under 16 to be forbidden from riding adult size quad bikes and passengers to be banned from single seat bikes.

Association chief executive David Crawford said the safe use of small vehicles, farm bikes, ATV (All-Terrain Vehicles) and side-by-side vehicles is “of paramount importance to manufacturers, distributors, dealerships and their customers“. . .

Fixating on the milk price is distracting the dairy industry from its own decline, expert says – Margot Kelly:

A leading dairy figure is warning the Australian industry needs to address underlying issues affecting farm profitability, rather than fixating on milk prices.

Farmgate milk prices have been in the spotlight since major processors suddenly and retrospectively cut prices in 2016.

The man who has headed up some of the largest dairy companies in the southern hemisphere said the trend of decreasing farm profitability in Australia had been emerging well before the dairy crisis. . . 

 

Lab meat: more hype than substance – Post Veganism:

If you believe all the headlines, in a few short years or even less time, the way meat is grown will radically change. Brewing like tanks full of dividing  cells will replace farms and factory farms raising livestock, thus no more animals will be slaughtered, all environmental issues- including climate change and water scarcity- will be resolved, world hunger will no longer exist, and deforestation will no longer be necessary. Plus best of all there will be meat a plenty that even die-hard vegans can consume with a clear conscience.

Okay, maybe this representation is a little bit of an exaggeration, but not by much. A lot of hyped up marketing spin is involved and has been expended to “position” lab meat, including re-branding it as “clean meat” (in vitro meat, cell meat, and cultured meat also didn’t do so good in the marketing surveys). That hype involves creating a market for a product line that might otherwise only have a very limited audience and appeal. To build a market, consumers have to be dissuaded from consuming real meat. So to build an audience a whole litany of out of context statistics are repeated about water footprints, land use, feed efficiency, deforestation, greenhouse gases, health concerns, and animal welfare. . . 


Saturday soapbox

July 14, 2018

Saturday’s soapbox is yours to use as you will – within the bounds of decency and absence of defamation. You’re welcome to look back or forward, discuss issues of the moment, to pontificate, ponder or point us to something of interest, to educate, elucidate or entertain, amuse, bemuse or simply muse, but not abuse.

Some people’s idea of free speech is that they are free to say what they like but if anyone says anything back, that is an outrage. – Sir Winston Churchill


July 14 in history

July 14, 2018

1223 Louis VIII became King of France upon the death of his father, Philip II of France.

1698 The Darien scheme began with five ships, bearing about 1,200 people, departing Leith for the Isthmus of Panama.

1769 The de Portolá Expedition established a base in California, and set out to find the Port of Monterey.

1771 Foundation of the Mission San Antonio de Padua  by the Franciscan friar Junípero Serra.

1789  French Revolution: Citizens of Paris stormed the Bastille and freed seven prisoners.

1790  French Revolution: Citizens of Paris celebrated the constitutional monarchy and national reconciliation in the Fête de la Fédération.

1791  The Priestley Riots drove  Joseph Priestley, a supporter of the French Revolution, out of Birmingham, England.

1798  The Sedition Act became law in the United States making it a federal crime to write, publish, or utter false or malicious statements about the government.

1834  James Abbott McNeill Whistler, American painter (d. 1903).

1858  Emmeline Pankhurst, English suffragette (d. 1928)

1865  First ascent of the Matterhorn by Edward Whymper and party, four of whom died on the descent.

1868  Gertrude Bell, English archaeologist, writer, spy, and administrator, was born (d. 1926).

1872 Albert Marque, French sculptor and doll maker, was born (d. 1939).

1881 Billy the Kid was shot and killed by Pat Garrett outside Fort Sumner.

1853 New Zealand’s first general election began.

NZ's first general election begins

1900 Armies of the Eight-Nation Alliance captured Tientsin during theBoxer Rebellion.

1902 The Campanile in St Mark’s Square, Venice collapsed, also demolishing the loggetta.

1903 Irving Stone, American writer, was born (d. 1989).

1910 William Hanna, American animator, was born  (d. 2001).

1911  Terry-Thomas, British actor, was born  (d. 1990).

1912 Woody Guthrie, American folk musician, was born (d. 1967).

1913 Gerald Ford, 38th President of the United States, was born (d. 2006).

1916 Start of the Battle of Delville Wood as an action in the Battle of the Somme.

1918  Ingmar Bergman, Swedish film and theatre director, was born (d. 2007).

1921 – Leon Garfield, English children’s author, was born (d. 1996).

1928 Nancy Olson, American actress, was born.

1930 Polly Bergen, American actress, was born.

1933 Gleichschaltung: In Germany, all political parties were outlawed except the Nazi Party.

1940 Susan Howatch, English author, was born.

1943  The George Washington Carver National Monument became the first United States National Monument in honor of an African American.

1948  Palmiro Togliatti, leader of the Italian Communist Party, was shot near the Italian Parliament.

1950 Sir Apirana Ngata died.

Death of Sir Apirana Ngata

1958  Iraqi Revolution:  the monarchy was overthrown by popular forces lead by Abdul Karim Kassem, who becomes the nation’s new leader.

1965  The Mariner 4 flyby of Mars took the first close-up photos of another planet.

1969  Football War: after Honduras lost a soccer match against El Salvador rioting broke out in Honduras against Salvadoran migrant workers.

1969  The United States $500, $1,000, $5,000 and $10,000 bills were officially withdrawn from circulation.

1984 – David Lange led Labour to election victory.

David Lange celebrating 1984 election victory

1992  386BSD was released by Lynne Jolitz and William Jolitz beginning the Open Source Operating System Revolution.

2000 A powerful solar flare, later named the Bastille Day event, caused a geomagnetic storm.

2002  French President Jacques Chirac escaped an assassination attempt unscathed during Bastille Day celebrations.

2003  The United States Government admitted the existence of “Area 51“.

2007  Russia withdrew from the Treaty on Conventional Armed Forces in Europe.

2013 – Israeli Tent Protests movement launched.

2015 – NASA’s New Horizons probe performed the first flyby of Pluto, and thus completes the initial survey of the Solar System.

2016 – A terrorist vehicular attack in Nice, France killed 86 civilians and injured more than 400 others.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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