365 days of gratitude

July 8, 2018

My farmer was almost too old for Young Farmers by the time we married.

That shouldn’t have stopped me joining, but to my regret, I chose not to.

He was on the organising committee of what was then the Skellerup Young Farmer of the Year contest so I went to those and have also accompanied him to the Young Farmers’ World Congress and several Young Farmer reunions.

That gave me a real appreciation of the value of Young Farmers and its role in education and leadership training and the strength of the friendships it fostered.

Attending the 50th anniversary of the Young Farmer contest on Thursday, enjoying the company of friends and Invercargill’s hospitality culminating in the FMG YOung Farmer contest last night reinforced all that.

While I still regret not joining the organisation, I’m grateful that for what I’ve gained from it albeit as the partner of an older Young Farmer rather than as a former member myself.


Word of the day

July 8, 2018

Tolu – a fragrant brown balsam obtained from a South American tree, used in perfumery and medicine; a fragrant gum obtained from the bark of a leguminous South American tree (Myroxylon balsamum), used in cough mixtures, flavourings, perfumes.


World Chocolate Day

July 8, 2018

How could I miss World Chocolate Day?

Following my farmer’s mantra that it’s better to know you’re loved every day and not just on a few days a year   day is chocolate day for me and it will still be July 7th somewhere in the world apropos of which:


Life Wants

July 8, 2018

Life Wants Prints

I hope someday you see this is all life wants: for you to be your own kind of beautiful & not the kind that makes you forget who you are. – Life Wants – © 2018 Brian Andreas – posted with permission.

You can buy books, posters, cards, ornaments and more and sign up for a daily dose of whimsy like this by email at Story People.

 

 


Rural round-up

July 8, 2018

Sheep milk gains to be tested by AgResearch:

AgReseach senior scientist Dr Linda Samuelsson says results of the trial to test the benefits of sheep milk for human consumption should be available next year.

In what is believed to be a world first, AgResearch is about to begin a clinical trial to test the benefits of sheep milk for human digestion.

The trial, which will see AgResearch scientists working alongside those at the Auckland University’s Liggins Institute, with support from Spring Sheep Milk Co in the central North Island and Blue River Dairy in Southland, comes at a time of rapid growth for the dairy sheep industry in New Zealand . . 

Portable footwear cleaning station to help stop farm contamination – Gerald Piddock:

A Waikato couple have created what they believe might be the world’s first portable biosecurity system for footwear.

The Jacson Cube, whose name is derived from its creators – husband and wife team Jacqui Humm​ and Russell Knutson​ – is a portable cleaning station that is small enough to fit in the back of a ute.

“It’s a step up from your bucket and brush particularly for those people travelling from farm to farm,” Humm said.

The system took two years to create, and Humm said it was her husband who came up with the idea. . .

Dairy farmer’s passion for goats:

Dunsandel farmer Michael Woodward may be Federated Farmers North Canterbury dairy chairman but his real passion is the angora goats he inherited from his father John.

John Woodward, of Pukekohe, is a pioneer of the mohair industry: he set up its pool marketing system about 1982, is a board member of Mohair Producers NZ and now manages marketing of the North Island mohair clip.

Michael Woodward, meanwhile, is sharemilking on 300ha at Dunsandel with his wife Susie. . .

Hemp is not marijuana, it is a formidable vegetable, says social entrepreneur:

Social entrepreneur Michael Mayell is speaking out about the beneficial properties of hemp to help inform and inspire Kiwis to embrace new business opportunities around what he calls a ‘formidable vegetable’.

“Hemp is food, fibre and medicine. Hemp is cannabis without any of the psychoactive properties of its cousin marijuana and is fuelling an emerging market which is an exciting opportunity for entrepreneurs and investors,” says Mayell, who started his food journey as founder of Cookie Time in 1983 and went on to found Nutrient Rescue, a social enterprise, in 2016 and the Drinkable Rivers in our Lifetime campaign. . .

Farmers encouraged to plan ahead by looking at green projects :

Farmers have been encouraged to plan ahead and look at green projects as the future of UK farming looks set to change.

Various grants and funding are on offer for farmers to encourage green growth, coupled with future government subsidies post-Brexit leaning towards environmental stewardship.

In recent debates regarding the future of farming subsidies, the government has strongly indicated that any future funding is likely to be based on farming practices that provide ‘public goods’. . . 

 

It’s time to “Join the Ag Revolution’ –

Agriculture is on the cusp of a revolution, with renewed enthusiasm fueling a transformation. 

Precision ag, increased production capabilities, and water-saving innovations are all reflective of an industry brimming with opportunity.

And now one of Australia’s rural heartlands is calling forth an agricultural army – a vibrant, skilled workforce to lead into the new age. 

‘Join the Ag Revolution’ is an initiative of Gwydir Valley Irrigators Association (GVIA), created to showcase and promote rural industries, and the passionate people behind them. . .


Logan Wallace 50th Young Farmer of Year

July 8, 2018

South Otago sheep farmer Logan Wallace has been named the 50th FMG Young Farmer of the Year.

The 28-year-old took out the coveted title in front of a crowd of 1,000 people in Invercargill tonight.

Elated locals cheered as their hometown boy made his way through a standing ovation and onto the stage.

It’s Logan’s second attempt at the title and means the sought-after winner’s trophy will be staying in Otago/Southland region.

The Waipahi sheep farmer convincingly beat six other finalists after three days of gruelling competition.

The event saw the men tackle fast-paced practical modules, technical challenges and an agri-knowledge quiz.

“We are immensely proud of Logan. He’s put his all into the contest,” said Logan’s father Ross Wallace.

“It’s something he’s wanted to do since he was a boy.”

Logan Wallace runs 2,300 ewes on a 290-hectare farm, which he leases from his parents.

The intensive sheep breeding and finishing property also carries 700 hoggets and 400 trading sheep.

The Clinton Young Farmers member, who has mild dyslexia, is heavily involved in his local community.

He leads a youth group and is a Land Search and Rescue member.

“I used some of those search and rescue planning skills this week to ensure I didn’t waste any time,” he said.

The winner’s prize package includes a New Holland tractor, a Honda quad bike, cash, scholarships, equipment and clothing.

The overall grand final prize pool was valued at more than $155,000.

“Logan Wallace is an extremely deserving winner,” said Andrea Brunner from FMG.

“He has demonstrated the breadth of knowledge, skill and capability required to be crowned the FMG Young Farmer of the Year.”

“The calibre of the finalists this year is testament to the depth of talent we have in our rural sector,” she said.

Allan Anderson won the prestigious title in 1970 and is the longest surviving Young Farmer of the Year Grand Champion.

“This win will be life changing. Logan should bask in the warmth of the win and make the most of the opportunities it will present,” said Allan.

The victory is made even more special because the contest, which began as a radio quiz in 1969, is celebrating its 50th anniversary.

“It’s pretty special that the grand finalist in the region hosting the 50th year managed to win the contest,” said contest chairman Dean Rabbidge.

“I’m proud of the entire Otago/Southland region for pulling together to make this grand final week such a success.”

Second place went to Cameron Black, who’s a Christchurch-based rural consultant for New Zealand Agri Brokers.

Bay of Plenty contract milker Josh Cozens took out third place and the agri-knowledge challenge.

An edited version of the 50th grand final will be available on digital streaming service ThreeNow from July 14th.

Challenge winners:

AGMARDT Agri-business challenge: Patrick Crawshaw

Massey University Agri-growth challenge: Logan Wallace

Ravensdown Agri-skills challenge: Logan Wallace

Agri-sports challenge (supported by Worksafe): Logan Wallace

Meridian Energy Agri-knowledge quiz and speech challenge: Josh Cozens

FMG People’s Choice Award: Patrick Crawshaw

We went down to Invercargill on Thursday for the 50th anniversary dinner.

My farmer was the 2nd best Young Farmer of the Year in the 10th contest.

Like two others who came second he went on to become National President.

In those days there were around 7000 members.

The ag-sag of the 80s started a decline in membership until it had only around 1000 members. That has been turned round in the last few years and Young Farmers numbers are continuing to grow.

The FMG Young Farmer contest plays an important role in the organisation and the enthusiasm shown by entrants in the AgriKids and TeenAg competitions augur well for its future.

So too does the high standard of the reunion dinner and the contest.

That’s good, not just for the individual members and Young Farmers but for farming and rural leadership too.


Sunday soapbox

July 8, 2018

Sunday’s soapbox is yours to use as you will – within the bounds of decency and absence of defamation. You’re welcome to look back or forward, discuss issues of the moment, to pontificate, ponder or point us to something of interest, to educate, elucidate or entertain, amuse, bemuse or simply muse, but not abuse.

Image may contain: text

You are an artist when you say you are. And you’re a good artist when you make somebody else experience or feel something deep or unexpected.  – Amanda Palmer


July 8 in history

July 8, 2018

1099 First Crusade: 15,000 starving Christian soldiers marched in a religious procession around Jerusalem as its Muslim defenders looked on.

1283  War of the Sicilian Vespers: Battle of Malta

1497  Vasco da Gama set sail on first direct European voyage to India.

1579 Our Lady of Kazan, a holy icon of the Russian Orthodox Church, was discovered underground in the city of Kazan.

1663  Charles II of England granted John Clarke a Royal Charter to Rhode Island.

1709  Great Northern War: Battle of Poltava: Peter I of Russia defeated Charles XII of Sweden at Poltava, effectively ending Sweden’s role as a major power in Europe.

1716  Great Northern War: Battle of Dynekilen.

1758  French forces held Fort Carillon against the British at Ticonderoga, New York.

1760 French and Indian War: Battle of Restigouche – British defeated French forces in last naval battle in New France.

1775  The Olive Branch Petition signed by the Continental Congress of theThirteen Colonies.

1776  The Declaration of Independence was read aloud in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and the Liberty Bell was rung.

1822 Chippewas turned over huge tract of land in Ontario to the United Kingdom.

1838 Ferdinand von Zeppelin, German inventor, was born (d. 1917).

1839 John D. Rockefeller, American industrialist and philanthropist, was born (d. 1937).

1853 Commodore Perry sailed into Tokyo Bay.

1859  King Charles XV/Carl IV acceded to the throne of Sweden-Norway.

1862 – New Zealand’s first prize fight took place.

New Zealand’s first prize fight?

1864 Ikedaya Jiken: the Shinsengumi sabotaged the Choshu-han shishi’s planned attack on Kyoto, Japan at Ikedaya.

1874  The Mounties began their March West.

1876  White supremacists killed five Black Republicans in Hamburg, SC.

1882 Percy Grainger, Australian composer, was born (d. 1961).

1889  The first issue of the Wall Street Journal was published.

1892  St. John’s, Newfoundland was devastated in the Great Fire of 1892.

1893 The New Zealand Racing Conference was formed to control the thoroughbred horse racing industry.

NZ Racing Conference established

1898 The shooting death of crime boss Soapy Smith released Skagway, Alaska from his iron grip.

1908 Nelson A. Rockefeller, 41st Vice President of the United States, was born (d. 1979).

1920 Godtfred Kirk Christiansen, Danish industrialist (Lego Group), was born (d. 1995).

1926 Elisabeth Kübler-Ross, Swiss-born psychiatrist, was born (d. 2004).

1932  The Dow Jones Industrial Average reached its lowest level of the Great Depression, bottoming out at 41.22.

1933 Marty Feldman, English comedian and actor, was born (d. 1982).

1948 The United States Air Force accepted its first female recruits into a programme called Women in the Air Force (WAF).

1960 Mal Meninga, Australian rugby league footballer, was born.

1960  Francis Gary Powers was charged with espionage resulting from his flight over the Soviet Union.

1961 Andrew Fletcher, English musician (Depeche Mode), was born.

1962 Ne Win besieged and dynamited the Ragoon University Student Union building to crash the Student Movement.

1965  Train robber Ronald Biggs escaped from Wandsworth Prison, London.

1966 King Mwambutsa IV Bangiriceng of Burundi was deposed by his sonPrince Charles Ndizi.

1928 Shane Howarth, New Zealand/Wales rugby player, was born.

1969 IBM CICS was made generally available for the 360 mainframe computer.

1970  Richard Nixon delivered a special congressional message enunciating Native American Self-Determination as official US Indian policy, leading to the Indian Self-Determination Act.

1977  The ashes of Ahn Eak-tai, a Korean conductor and the composer of the national anthem Aegukga, were transferred from the island of Majorca to the Korean National Cemetery.

1982 Assassination attempt against former Iraqi president Saddam Hussein in Dujail.

1982 – Senegalese Trotskyist political party LCT was legally recognised.

1992 Conference for Security and Co-operation in Europe created the office of High Commissioner on National Minorities.

1996 A man armed with a machete wounded three children and four adults at a primary school in Wolverhampton. Teacher Lisa Potts received theGeorge medal for protecting her pupils, despite being severely injured.

1997 NATO invited the Czech Republic, Hungary, and Poland to join the alliance in 1999.

1999  Allen Lee Davis was executed by electric chair by the state of Florida, that state’s last use of the electric chair for capital punishment.

2003  Sudan Airways Flight 39, with 116 people on board, crashed in Sudan; the only survivor was a two-year-old boy who subsequently died as a result of his injuries.

2011 – Space Shuttle Atlantis was launched in the final mission of the U.S. Space Shuttle programme.

2014  – Israel launched an offensive on Gaza amidst rising tensions following the killing of Israeli teenagers.

2014 – Brazil lost 1-7 to Germany in the 2014 FIFA World Cup semi-final. The event is known as Mineirazo.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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