365 days of gratitude

June 12, 2018

The sky’s been grey and we’ve had drizzle off and on all day.

Mother Nature has been far more restrained down here than she was further north where friends got 140mms of rain in 24 hours and I’m grateful for that restraint.


Word of the day

June 12, 2018

Shule – synagogue.


Rural round-up

June 12, 2018

Work at Ravensdown’s helm ‘incredibly fulfilling’ – Sally Rae:

It is not very often, as Greg Campbell acknowledges, that a chief executive wants more regulation.

But the boss of Ravensdown is very pleased the Government is investing more money on biosecurity.

He has been concerned the fertiliser sector was far too open to anyone to bring any product into New Zealand and call it fertiliser. . .

Envoy recommends eradication – Sally Rae:

New Zealand special agricultural trade envoy Mike Petersen says it appears Mycoplasma bovis is more serious than reports have  so far indicated.

Mr Petersen, a former Beef and Lamb New Zealand chairman, has just returned after a busy time in the UK and Europe with discussions around the future of farming and trade.

Farmers he had spoken to who had the bacterial disease on their properties believed New Zealand should try to eradicate it. . .

Sheep and beef farmers working with nature to create profit:

Farming systems that work with nature are in high demand from consumers of the food that is being produced.

A true farm profit working with a healthy environment is the goal in this new world of ever-increasing environmental scrutiny.

Brendon Walsh from GrowFarm has been working with sheep and beef farmers as a business coach for a number of years. . . 

Love at first sight – after a haircut: Farmer finds his future wife at Fieldays

Taranaki’s trio of Fieldays Rural Catch finalists can take heart – the competition has resulted in at least one marriage and two babies.

Trainee helicopter pilot Lilly Newton, 21, of Urenui, South Taranaki dairy manager Sam Hughson, also 21, and New Plymouth dairy farmer Berny Hall, 29, are among eight young farmers facing off in the fight for the coveted Golden Gumboot this week.

The competition has been a popular fixture on the Fieldays calendar for 13 years, giving competitors the opportunity to test their skills both on and off the farm and a shot at an impressive prize pool. . .

First Northlander to go through to the Bayer Young Viticulturist of the Year National Final:

 Congratulations to Jake Dromgool from The Landing in Kerikeri who became the Bayer Auckland/Northern Young Viticulturist of the Year 2018. He will go through to represent the region at the National Final at the end of August and will be the first Northlander to ever compete in this prestigious Final. . .

I quit my job to farm: Laura Hodgkins, 30, West Sussex – Emily Ashworth:

Laura Hodgkins, 30, quit her her job in marketing to take on a tenanted farm with her husband, Andy, 31. Here she tells us her reasons and how she has found her place in the farming world.

1) Where and what do you farm?

Our tenanted farm, Cocking Hill Farm, is part of the Cowdray Estate. Situated on the South Downs in West Sussex, it consists of around 700 acres. It is mainly chalk grassland, rising up to 800ft above sea level.

We run a 2,000 head flock of New Zealand Romneys on an extensive outdoor system, predominantly for breeding stock. . . 


Timing deliberate

June 12, 2018

Soon to-be acting Prime Minister Winston Peters is suing the Government.

Peters is suing the Ministry of Social Development, plus it its chief executive, Brendan Boyle, and State Services Commissioner Peter Hughes for $450,000 for breach of privacy – relating to his belief over how details of his pension overpayment were leaked to journalists.

He is also suing former ministers Paula Bennett and Anne Tolley but that is no surprise. They have always been targets.

The really stunning aspect of the new action is its timing so close to the date he is due to become Acting Prime Minister for six weeks.

Even if he had a water-tight case – and there is no evidence that he has – wouldn’t he delay it for the sake of a peaceful transition? . . 

Quite what Peters expects to achieve by wasting taxpayers’ money on this at all let alone on the eve of his taking over as acting PM is hard to fathom.

But the timing must be deliberate and it comes with his waiting until the last minute to pull support for repealing the three-strikes legislation.

Anyone willing to bet that all will be calm and stable while Peters is acting PM?

 


If Cabinet counts . . .

June 12, 2018

Labour’s attempt to repeal the three-strikes legislation has been struck out by New Zealand First:

. . . Justice Minister Andrew Little was forced to backtrack on the proposed repeal that he was planning to take to Cabinet on Monday after NZ First indicated it wouldn’t support it.

In a press conference on Monday morning Little tried to leave the door open on three strikes being repealed in the future, saying NZ First didn’t support a “piecemeal” approach and wanted to see the total justice reform package. 

However, it’s understood NZ First MPs have been working on this issue for weeks. The caucus has no plans to budge on its long-held view of being tough on law and order after seeking feedback from its voter base. . . 

Little might have thought he could get the legislation past NZ First’s tough law and order stance because the party has managed to support other policies to which it is supposedly opposed but he was very silly not to have had a water-tight commitment of support well before this.

That wasn’t his only mistake.

. . . On Justice Minister Andrew Little’s backtrack today on the Three Strikes law repeal, Ardern said it would have been better to wait until a Cabinet decision had been made. . . 

Yes indeed.

But if Cabinet is supposed to count in this decision why didn’t it count in the decision to ban oil and gas exploration?


Quote of the day

June 12, 2018

Laws and customs may be creative of vice; and should be therefore perpetually under process of observation and correction: but laws and customs cannot be creative of virtue: they may encourage and help to preserve it; but they cannot originate it. Harriet Martineau who was born on this day in 1802.


June 12 in history

June 12, 2018

1381  Peasants’ Revolt: in England, rebels arrived at Blackheath.

1418  An insurrection delivered Paris to the Burgundians.

1429  Hundred Years’ War: Joan of Arc led the French army in their capture of the city and the English commander, William de la Pole, 1st Duke of Suffolk in the second day of the Battle of Jargeau.

1560  Battle of Okehazama: Oda Nobunaga defeated Imagawa Yoshimoto.

1653  First Anglo-Dutch War: the Battle of the Gabbard began.

1665 England installed a municipal government in New York City.

1758 French and Indian War: Siege of Louisbourg – James Wolfe‘s attack at Louisbourg, Nova Scotia commenced.

1775  American Revolution: British general Thomas Gage declared martial law in Massachusetts. The British offer a pardon to all colonists who lay down their arms with two exceptions: Samuel Adams and John Hancock, if captured, were to be hanged.

1776 The Virginia Declaration of Rights was adopted.

1798 Irish Rebellion of 1798: Battle of Ballynahinch.

1802 Harriet Martineau,  journalist, political economist, abolitionist and feminist, was born (d. 1876).

1806 John A. Roebling, German-America civil engineer (Brooklyn Bridge), was born (d. 1869).

1819  Charles Kingsley, English writer, was born (d. 1875).

1827 Johanna Spyri, Swiss writer, was born (d. 1901).

1830  Beginning of the French colonization of Algeria: 34,000 French soldiers landed at Sidi Ferruch.

1860  The State Bank of the Russian Empire was established.

1864 American Civil War, Overland Campaign: Battle of Cold Harbor – Ulysses S. Grant gave the Confederate forces under Robert E. Lee a victory when he pulled his Union troops from their positions at Cold Harbor, Virginia and moved south.

1889 –  78 people were killed in the Armagh rail disaster.

1897 Anthony Eden, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, was born (d. 1977).

1898 Philippine Declaration of Independence: General Emilio Aguinaldodeclared the Philippines’ independence from Spain.

1899 New Richmond Tornado killed 117 people and injured around 200.

1915 David Rockefeller, American banker, was born.

1922 King George V received the colours of the six Irish regiments that were to be disbanded – the Royal Irish Regiment, the Connaught Rangers, the South Irish Horse, the Prince of Wales’s Leinster Regiment, the Royal Munster Fusiliers and the Royal Dublin Fusiliers.

1924 George H. W. Bush, 41st President of the United States, was born.

1929 Anne Frank, German-born Dutch Jewish diarist and Holocaust victim, was born (d. 1945).

1935 Chaco War ended: a truce was called between Bolivia and Paraguay.

1938 Tom Oliver, Australian actor, was born.

1939  Shooting begins on Paramount Pictures’ Dr. Cyclops, the first horror film photographed in three-strip Technicolor.

1939  The Baseball Hall of Fame opened in Cooperstown, New York.

1940  World War II: 13,000 British and French troops surrendered to Major General Erwin Rommel at Saint-Valery-en-Caux.

1942 The first troops from the USA landed in Auckland.

First US troops land in Auckland

1942  Anne Frank received a diary for her thirteenth birthday.

1943  Reg Presley, English singer/songwriter (The Troggs), was born.

1943  Germany liquidated the Jewish Ghetto in Berezhany, westernUkraine. 1,180  are lpeople were led to the city’s old Jewish graveyard and shot.

1952 Pete Farndon, English musician (The Pretenders), was born (d. 1983).

1963 Civil rights leader Medgar Evers was murdered by Ku Klux Klan member Byron De La Beckwith.

1964 Anti-apartheid activist and ANC leader Nelson Mandela wassentenced to life in prison for sabotage in South Africa.

1967  The United States Supreme Court in Loving v. Virginia declared all U.S. state laws which prohibited interracial marriage to be unconstitutional.

1967   Venera 4 was launched.

1979  Bryan Allen won the second Kremer prize for a man powered flight across the English Channel in the Gossamer Albatross.

1987  The Central African Republic‘s former Emperor Jean-Bédel Bokassawas sentenced to death for crimes he had committed during his 13-year rule.

1987  Cold War: At the Brandenburg Gate U.S. President Ronald Reagan publicly challenged Mikhail Gorbachev to tear down the Berlin Wall.

1990 Russia Day – the parliament of the Russian Federation formally declared its sovereignty.

1991  Russians elected Boris Yeltsin as the president of the republic.

1991 –  Kokkadichcholai massacre: the Sri Lankan Army massacred 152 minority Tamil civilians in the village Kokkadichcholai.

1994  Nicole Brown Simpson and Ronald Goldman were murdered outside her home in Los Angeles.

1996  In Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, a panel of federal judges blocked a law against indecency on the internet.

1997  Queen Elizabeth II reopened the Globe Theatre in London.

1999  Kosovo War: Operation Joint Guardian began when a NATO-led United Nations peacekeeping force (KFor) entered the province of Kosovo.

2000  Sandro Rosa do Nascimento took hostages while robbing Bus #174 in Rio de Janeiro.

2004  A 1.3 kilogram chondrite type meteorite struck a house in Ellerslie causing serious damage but no injuries.

2009 – A disputed presidential election in Iran leads to wide ranging protests in Iran and around the world.

2016  – 49 civilians were killed and 53 others injured in an attack on a gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida. The gunman, Omar Mateen, was killed in a gunfight with police.

2017 – American student Otto Warmbier returned home in a coma after spending 17 months in a North Korean prison and died a week later.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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