365 days of gratitude

June 10, 2018

A warm house, a good book and all Sunday afternoon to read it – for that I’m grateful.


Word of the day

June 10, 2018

Superciliary – relating to or adjoining the eyebrow or the region over the eye; having a conspicuous line or marking over the eye.


Wild Song

June 10, 2018

Wild Song Prints

I wish for you a life where your blood sings with the voice of an eager wild thing. With a voice that says I am here & in this short time, this is the song I sing because I can. – Wild Song © 2018 Brian Andreas – posted with permission.

You can buy books, posters, cards, ornaments and more and sign up for a daily dose of whimsy like this by email at Story People.


Rural round-up

June 10, 2018

Lots of challenges for chief executive :

Terry Copeland says he is looking forward to his new challenge.

The New Zealand Young Farmers (NZYF) chief executive is set to take over as Federated Farmers’ new boss next month and admits dealing with the ongoing impact of the Mycoplasma bovis outbreak will be a ”baptism of fire”.

”I’ve got a real passion for wellness and mental health and I plan to bring that to my new role.

”Through the fallout from Mycoplasma bovis there will be a lot of communities in severe crisis, so making sure communities are supported will be hugely important . .

Waitotara Valley farmer Roger Pearce aims for more diversity – Laurel Stowell:

A farmer way up the Waitōtara Valley plans to get carbon credits from his poplars and is planting mānuka and using cattle to open up the ground for regenerating native bush.

Diversifying appeals to Roger Pearce, who has been farming in Makakaho Rd for four years. His land is becoming a patchwork of bush, closely planted poplars, mānuka, pasture and green feed crops.

“I like the idea, and the overall picture, where it’s going for the long term – not just intensively farming livestock,” he said . .

Hawkes Bay farmers warned of impact of synthetic meat

Farmers are being warned the meat industry they could go the same way as the wool industry if they ignore the threat of synthetic proteins.

The warning comes in the Hawke’s Bay Farming Benchmarking Review by accounting and advisory firm Crowe Horwath which saids repeated failure of the wool industry to respond to the threat of synthetic fibres was a “clear and serious warning” of potential problems in the red-meat sector. . .

Spierings’ Fonterra has created two new food categories :

Fonterra’s performance since formation in 2001, especially since listing in late 2012, has been the subject of much discussion around farm house kitchen tables, in supplier meetings in country halls, among Wellington regulators and in the media.

More than 10,000 supplying shareholders and several hundred investors in the Fonterra Shareholders’ Fund (FSF) have views on the giant’s performance ranging from laudatory to sceptical to dismissive.

Farmers Weekly has printed a range of views in a series called Fonterra’s Scorecard preparatory to the Government’s review of the dairy industry by the Ministry for Primary Industries this year.

Some conclusions are summarised here under subject headings and the report card is mixed. . .

 

Dreaded drought descends on paradise – Mal Peters:

The drought has its claws into the Peters farm after a run of good seasons but that does not make it any easier to manage while keeping yourself on top in the head department. In the last few years we had started on some long overdue capital improvements that now will have to be put on hold but the shock has been the rapid onset and time of year that has made the impact so severe.

My farm includes part of Wallangra Station that has some 120 years of rainfall records so it is interesting to look back on that admittedly short history to see what has happened. When looking at the November to April rainfall there are five standout crook times: 1902, 1919, 1965, 2007 and now this year. . . 

Drought is part of Australia’s DNA – John Carter:

Eastern Australia is in another major drought and the cattle industry is in big trouble. Mal Peters’ outstanding May column was a poignant description of what most cattlemen are enduring – very expensive or no feed, declining or no water and big price falls.

The stress is exacerbated by Indian and American inroads into our export markets and chicken into our domestic market. Drought is part of Australia’s DNA. No-one can predict when it will come to an area or when it will break. Talk of more money for weather forecasters to tell farmers when to plant their crops is Disneyland stuff-the next fortnight is all they can predict with any accuracy. . .

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Sunday soapbox

June 10, 2018

Sunday’s soapbox is yours to use as you will – within the bounds of decency and absence of defamation. You’re welcome to look back or forward, discuss issues of the moment, to pontificate, ponder or point us to something of interest, to educate, elucidate or entertain, amuse, bemuse or simply muse, but not abuse.
Image result for quotes Margaret mahy

I would not send a poor girl into the world, ignorant of the snares that best her path; nor would I watch and guard her, till, deprived of self-respect and self-reliance, she lost the power or the will to watch and guard herself – Anne Bronte


June 10 in history

June 10, 2018

1190  Third Crusade:  Frederick I Barbarossa drowned in the river Saleph while leading an army to Jerusalem.

1539 Council of Trent: Paul III sent out letters to his bishops, delaying the Council due to war and the difficulty bishops had travelling to Venice.

1619 Thirty Years’ War: Battle of Záblatí, a turning point in the Bohemian Revolt.

1624 Treaty of Compiègne, signed between France and the Netherlands.

1688  Prince of Wales, James Francis Edward Stuart, was born (d. 1766).

1692 Salem witch trials: Bridget Bishop was hanged at Gallows Hill  for “certaine Detestable Arts called Witchcraft & Sorceries”.

1710 James Short, Scottish mathematician, optician and telescope maker was born  (d. 1768).

1719 Jacobite Rising: Battle of Glen Shiel.

1770  Captain James Cook ran aground on the Great Barrier Reef.

1786  A landslide dam on the Dadu River created by an earthquake ten days earlier collapses, killing 100,000 in the Sichuan province of China.

1793  The Jardin des Plantes museum opened in Paris.

1793 – French Revolution: Following the arrests of Girondin leaders theJacobins gained control of the Committee of Public Safety installing therevolutionary dictatorship.

1805  First Barbary War: Yussif Karamanli signed a treaty ending hostilities with the United States.

1829 The first Boat Race between the University of Oxford and theUniversity of Cambridge took place.

1838  Myall Creek Massacre in Australia: 28 Aboriginal Australians are murdered.

1854  The first class of the United States Naval Academy students graduated.

1864  American Civil War: Battle of Brice’s Crossroads – Confederate troops under Nathan Bedford Forrest defeated a much larger Union force led by General Samuel D. Sturgis.

1871  Sinmiyangyo: Captain McLane Tilton led 109 Marines in a naval attack on Han River forts on Kanghwa Island, Korea.

1886  Mount Tarawera erupted, killing 153 people and destroying the famous Pink and White Terraces.

 

Eruption of Mt Tarawera

1898 Spanish-American War: U.S. Marines landed in Cuba.

1901 Frederick Loewe, Austrian-born composer, was born  (d. 1988).

1906 Liberal Prime Minister Richard Seddon died at sea while returning from Australia to what he called “God’s Own Country”.

Death of Richard Seddon

1910 Robert Still, English composer, was born  (d. 1971).

1915 Saul Bellow, Canadian born writer and Nobel laureate was born (d. 2005).

1918 The Austro-Hungarian battleship SMS Szent István sank after being torpedoed by an Italian MAS motorboat.

1921 Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, was born.

1922 Judy Garland, American musical actress, was born (d. 1969).

1923 Robert Maxwell, Slovakian-born newspaperman was born  (d. 1991).

1924 Fascists kidnapped and killed Italian socialist leader Giacomo Matteotti.

1925 Inaugural service for the United Church of Canada, a union of Presbyterian, Methodist, and Congregationalist churches, held in Toronto Arena.

1935  Dr. Robert Smith took his last drink, and Alcoholics Anonymous was founded by him and Bill Wilson.

1940 Augie Auer, US born New Zealand meteorologist and television presenter, was born  (d. 2007).

1940 World War II: Italy declared war on France and the United Kingdom.

1940 – World War II: U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt denounced Italy’s actions with his “Stab in the Back” speech at the graduation ceremonies of the University of Virginia.

1940 – World War II: German forces, under General Erwin Rommel, reached the English Channel.

1940 – World War II: Canada declared war on Italy.

1940 – World War II: Norway surrendered to German forces.

1942  World War II: Nazis burnt the Czech village of Lidice in reprisal for the killing of Reinhard Heydrich.

1944 World War II: 642 men, women and children were killed in the Oradour-sur-Glane Massacre in France.

1944 – World War II: In Distomo, Boeotia Prefecture, Greece 218 men, women and children were massacred by German troops.

1945  Australian Imperial Forces landed in Brunei Bay to liberate Brunei.

1947 Saab produced its first car.

1957 John Diefenbaker led the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada to a stunning upset in the Canadian federal election, 1957, ending 22 years of Liberal Party rule.

1965 – Vietnam War: The Battle of Dong Xoai began.

1965 – Susanne Albers, German computer scientist and academic, was born.

1967 –  Six-Day War ended  Israel and Syria agreed to a cease-fire.

1973 John Paul Getty III was kidnapped in Rome.

1977 – Apple shipped its first Apple II personal computer.

1980 The African National Congress published a call to fight from their imprisoned leader Nelson Mandela.

1996  Peace talks began in Northern Ireland without the participation of Sinn Féin.

1997 Khmer Rouge leader Pol Pot ordered the killing of his defence chief Son Sen and 11 of Sen’s family members.

1999  Kosovo War: NATO suspended its air strikes after Slobodan Milošević agreed to withdraw Serbian forces from Kosovo.

2001  Pope John Paul II canonized Lebanon s first female saint Saint Rafqa.

2002  The first direct electronic communication experiment between the nervous systems of two humans was carried out by Kevin Warwick in the United Kingdom.

2003  The Spirit Rover was launched, beginning NASA’s Mars Exploration Rover mission.

2003 – Wicked opened on Broadway, and subsequently won 40 awards for the Broadway production.

2016 – Former The Voice contestant Christina Grimmie was fatally shot in Orlando, Florida following a concert; she died from her injuries at the age of 22.

2017 – The 2017 World Expo was opened in Astana, Kazakhstan.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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