365 days of gratitude

June 1, 2018

Old friends and new, sparkling conversation to accompany a meal someone else cooked made it a very enjoyable evening for which I’m grateful.


Word of the day

June 1, 2018

Quotidian – of or occurring every day; daily; everyday, commonplace; denoting the malignant form of malaria.


Rural round-up

June 1, 2018

Farmers at country club: ‘We want to stop the spread’-:

A small Tararua farming community has told the agriculture minister of the uncertainty facing it because of the cattle disease Mycoplasma bovis.

Damien O’Connor visited the community of Makuri near Pahiatua today as part of the government’s Mycoplasma bovis roadshow.

Tararua district mayor and farmer Tracey Collis was there and told Checkpoint there was a lot to be learned from the Mycoplasma bovis scare.

“Watching the uncertainty in farmers in the district – it’s not something you wouldn’t wish on anybody,” she said.

“I think we need to tidy up our practises. [Husband] Mike and I spent five years as organic dairy farmers and within that system anything that came onto the farm was cleaned.” . . 

M bovis eradication costs will be uneven:

The costs of the attempted eradication of Mycoplasma bovis will be borne unevenly, although economists say the full extent of the costs has yet be calculated.

The Government chose to attempt to eradicate the presence of the bacterium, noting the current estimates of eradication costs were smaller than the estimated costs of management.

No country has yet successfully eradicated the disease, but the Government does not want to regret not trying. . . 

Decision made but important to find the cause – Allan Barber:

The Government decision to eradicate rather than contain Mp. Bovis has the merit of drawing a line under the first stage of the disease outbreak. There were three options under consideration: eradicate, manage or do nothing; the third was clearly not seriously considered, but there must have been a serious debate between the first two. In the end the eradication course of action was chosen because it gives ‘the best shot’ at eliminating the disease to the benefit of the New Zealand agricultural sector, particularly the dairy industry, and the economy.

The other factor which weighed in favour of the chosen option was MPI’s cost estimate of $886 million in contrast to $1.2 billion from attempting to manage the disease, although at any point along the way it may prove necessary to accept eradication is not possible and management will then become the default option. The likely first trigger point for a change will come in October/November after calving when cows are at their most stressed and liable to show signs of Mp. Bovis. The third option of doing nothing has been estimated to cost $1.3 billion in lost production over 10 years as well as continuing productivity losses. . . 

ANZ announces Mycoplasma Bovis assistance package:

ANZ Bank today announced an assistance package to help Mycoplasma Bovis-affected cattle farmers meet their short-term cash-flow requirements and ultimately re-establish their herds.

The ANZ Mycoplasma Bovis relief package is in response to this week’s Government announcement stating it would work with farming sector leaders to attempt to eradicate the disease, which is not harmful to humans, over the next few years.

The package will be effective immediately.

ANZ also acknowledges the efforts of the Rural Support Trust and will make a $20,000 donation to support their important work with local farmers on the ground. . . 

Future Focus planning boost for farming partners in Tararua

Tararua and Southern Hawke’s Bay sheep and beef farming couples are among the first in the country to be offered a new programme to help them plan for long-term business success, developed in response to strong industry demand.

Launched recently, the programme equips farming partners to decide their business and family goals together, then use that to plan for, and lead, their teams.

Funded by the Red Meat Profit Partnership (RMPP) PGP programme, Future Focus, is initially being offered in seven rural centres, involving more than 100 participants.

Designed and delivered by the Agri-Women’s Development Trust (AWDT), each two-day programme will be held over two months. . . 

Supply pressure building in major world beef markets:

It’s been a positive start to 2018 for the global beef sector – with production and consumption up and prices generally favourable – however, building pressures in some of the world’s major beef-producing nations have the potential to change export market dynamics, with implications for New Zealand, according to a recently-released industry report.

In its Beef Quarterly Q2 2018 – Production continuing to Grow, but Supply Pressure Starting to Mount, agribusiness banking specialist Rabobank says supply pressure is growing in global beef markets due to dry weather conditions in the US, a surplus of animal protein in Brazil and changes in live cattle trade out of Australia.

Report co-author, Rabobank New Zealand animal proteins analyst Blake Holgate says the degree to which these supply pressures continue to build will determine the extent of their impact on global markets. . . 

Survey underlines rural connectivity frustration:

Plenty of rural folk have jumped at the chance to respond to a Federated Farmers survey on the quality of telecommunications connectivity out in the provinces.

There were close to 500 responses within 24 hours of the launch of the survey.

“It’s hardly surprising because we know from member feedback that broadband and mobile blackspots cause considerable frustration,” Federated Farmers Vice-President Andrew Hoggard says.

“Technology is a huge and increasing facet of modern farming. If the apps and programmes on farmers’ digital devices drop out or run at crawl-speeds, they simply can’t run their businesses efficiently.” . . 

The survey link is https://survey123.arcgis.com/share/a09e7cdf97874d85b722169fc6649d4f . . .

 


Friday’s answers

June 1, 2018

Teletext gets my thanks for posing Thursday’s questions and can claim a bag of toasted hazelnuts for stumping us all by leaving the answers below.

 

The only answers I was confident about were 1 – Elton John and the bonus – Dick Quax.


Raise a glass to World Milk Day

June 1, 2018

It’s World Milk Day.

In 2001, the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations (FAO) selected June 1st as World Milk Day, which celebrates the important contributions of the dairy sector to sustainability, economic development, livelihoods and nutrition. The Global Dairy Platform is coordinating global celebrations on June 1, 2018. . .

Fonterra is offering the chance to win a year’s supply of milk – follow the link here.


11.5c + 3-4c = more poverty

June 1, 2018

Petrol was $2.22 a litre when I filled up my car yesterday.

That’s expensive and it’s going to get worse:

Aucklanders will be hit with a 11.5c a litre rise as soon the regional fuel tax comes into effect on July 1, with petrol companies saying they will be passing the full increase on.

And there will be more pain when prices rise by as much as 4c a litre again on October 1 if the first round of three national fuel excise increases is implemented following a policy statement announcement at the end of June.

The Government has indicated the increase will be 3-4c every year for three years. . . 

A tax of 11.5 cents now and 3-4 cents in a few weeks will add up to more poverty.

Aucklanders might face the highest price increase but it will affect all of us one way or another because at least some of the price rise will spread throughout the country.

Every trip everyone makes in a petrol-fueled vehicle will cost more and so too will every trip everything everyone buys, and everything that goes into everything everyone buys.

The price rise might encourage some to forgo private transport for public, but public transport doesn’t serve everyone in cities and there are no passenger trains and local buses outside cities and you can’t put goods and services on trains and buses.

The price rises will fuel inflation which will put pressure on interest rates which will put more pressure on prices which will further fuel inflation . . .

And who will be hardest hit by that?

It’s always the poorest.

Auckland needs better roads but had mayor Phil Goff kept to his promise of finding 3-6 percent efficiencies across the Council budget, this tax would not be needed.

For the sake of us all, Aucklanders must come up with a viable alternative who could beat the incumbent at next year’s election to save us from another three years of tax and spend.


Quote of the day

June 1, 2018

Since the printing press came into being, poetry has ceased to be the delight of the whole community of man; it has become the amusement and delight of the few. – John Masefield who was born on this day in 1878.


June 1 in history

June 1, 2018

193 Roman Emperor Didius Julianus was assassinated.

987 Hugh Capet was elected King of France.

1204  King Philip Augustus of France conquered Rouen.

1215  Beijing ruler Emperor Xuanzong of Jin, was captured by the Mongols under Genghis Khan, ending the Battle of Beijing.

1252 Alfonso X was elected King of Castile and León.

1495  Friar John Cor recorded the first known batch of scotch whisky.

1533  Anne Boleyn was crowned Queen of England.

1660 Mary Dyer was hanged for defying a law banning Quakers from the Massachusetts Bay Colony.

1679 The Scottish Covenanters defeated John Graham of Claverhouse at the Battle of Drumclog.

1779  Benedict Arnold, a general in the Continental Army was court-martialed for malfeasance.

1792  Kentucky was admitted as the 15th state of the United States.

1794 The battle of the Glorious First of June was fought, the first naval engagement between Britain and France during the French Revolutionary Wars.

1796 Tennessee was admitted as the 16th state of the United States.

1812  War of 1812: U.S. President James Madison asked the Congress to declare war on the United Kingdom.

1813  James Lawrence, the mortally-wounded commander of the USSChesapeake, gave his final order: “Don’t give up the ship!”

1815  Napoleon swore fidelity to the Constitution of France.

1831  James Clark Ross discovered the North Magnetic Pole.

1843 Henry Faulds, Scottish fingerprinting pioneer, was born  (d. 1930).

1855  American adventurer William Walker conquered Nicaragua.

1857 Charles Baudelaire‘s Fleurs du mal was published.

1862  American Civil War, Peninsula Campaign: Battle of Seven Pines (or the Battle of Fair Oaks) ended inconclusively, with both sides claiming victory.

1868 Treaty of Bosque Redondo was signed allowing the Navajos to return to their lands in Arizona and New Mexico.

1869  Thomas Edison received a patent for his electric voting machine.

1878 – John Masefield, English novelist and poet was born (d. 1967).

1879 Napoleon Eugene, the last dynastic Bonaparte, was killed in the Anglo-Zulu War.

1886 – The railroads of the Southern United States converted 11,000 miles of track from a five foot rail gauge to standard gauge.

1890  The United States Census Bureau began using Herman Hollerith‘stabulating machine to count census returns.

1907 Frank Whittle, English inventor of the jet engine was born (d. 1996).

1910  Robert Falcon Scott’s South Pole expedition left England.

1918  World War I: Battle for Belleau Wood – Allied Forces under John J. Pershing and James Harbord engaged Imperial German Forces under Wilhelm, German Crown Prince.

1920  Adolfo de la Huerta became president of Mexico.

1921 Nelson Riddle, American bandleader and arranger, was born  (d. 1985).

1921 Tulsa Race Riot.

1922  The Royal Ulster Constabulary was founded.

1926 Andy Griffith, American actor  was born (d. 2012).

1926 – Marilyn Monroe, American actress, was born  (d. 1962).

1928  Bob Monkhouse, English comedian, was born (d. 2003).

1929  The 1st Conference of the Communist Parties of Latin America was held in Buenos Aires.

1930 Edward Woodward, English actor, was born  (d. 2009).

1934 Pat Boone, American singer, was born.

1935  The first driving tests were introduced in the United Kingdom.

1937 Morgan Freeman, American actor, was born.

1937 Colleen McCullough, Australian novelist, was born (d. 2015).

1939 Maiden flight of the Focke-Wulf Fw 190 Würger (D-OPZE) fighter aeroplane.

1940  The Leninist Communist Youth League of the Karelo-Finnish SSR holds its first congress.

1940  The Brooklyn-Manhattan Transit Corporation went out of business, giving the City of New York full control of the subway system in the city.

1941  World War II: Battle of Crete ended as Crete capitulated to Germany.

1941 – The Farhud, a pogrom of Iraqi Jews in Baghdad.

1942 World War II: the Warsaw paper Liberty Brigade published the first news of the concentration camps.

1943 British Overseas Airways Corporation Flight 777 wasshot down over the Bay of Biscay by German Junkers Ju 88s, killing actor Leslie Howard and leading to speculation the downing was an attempt to kill British Prime Minister Winston Churchill.

1946 Ion Antonescu, “Conducator” (leader) of Romania during World War 2, was executed.

1947 – Ronnie Wood, English guitarist (Rolling Stones), was born.

1950 Wayne Nelson, American musician (Little River Band), was born.

1958 Charles de Gaulle came out of retirement to lead France by decree for six months.

1960 New Zealand’s first official television transmission began at 7.30pm.

NZ's first official TV broadcast

1960 Simon Gallup, English bassist (The Cure), was born.

1963  Kenya gained internal self-rule (Madaraka Day).

1974  Flixborough disaster: an explosion at a chemical plant killed 28 people.

1974 –The Heimlich maneuver for rescuing choking victims was published in the journal Emergency Medicine.

1978 – The first international applications under the Patent Cooperation Treaty were filed.

1979 – The first black-led government of Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) in 90 years took power.

1980  Cable News Network (CNN) begins broadcasting.

1988  The 4th Congress of the Communist Youth of Greece started.

1990  George H. W. Bush and Mikhail Gorbachev signed a treaty to end chemical weapon production.

1993  Dobrinja mortar attack: 13 were killed and 133 wounded when Serb mortar shells are fired at a soccer game in Dobrinja, west of Sarajevo.

1999  American Airlines Flight 1420 slid and crashed while landing at Little Rock National Airport, killing 11 people.

2000  The Patent Law Treaty was signed.

2001  Nepalese royal massacre : Crown Prince Dipendra of Nepal shot and killed several members of his family including his father and mother, King Birendra and Queen Aiswarya.

2001 – Dolphinarium massacre: a Hamas suicide bomber killed 21 at a disco in Tel Aviv.

2003  Filling began of the reservoir behind the Three Gorges Dam.

2005 The Dutch referendum on the European Constitution resulted in its rejection.

2009 Air France Flight 447 crashed into the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Brazil. All 228 passengers and crew were killed.

2009 – General Motors filed for chapter 11 bankruptcy. It is the fourth largest United States bankruptcy in history.

2011 – A rare tornado outbreak occurred in New England; a strong EF3 tornado struck Springfield, Massachusetts during the event, killing four people.

2012 – The Boeing 747-8 Intercontinental jumbo jet aircraft was introduced with Lufthansa.

2014 – A bombing at a football field in Mubi, Nigeria, killed at least 40 people.

2015 – A ship carrying 458 people capsized on Yangtze River in China’s Hubei province, killing 400 people.

Sourced from NZ  History Online & Wikipedia


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