365 days of gratitude

May 3, 2018

When, as there was this morning, a meeting at home it sometimes falls on me to provide lunch.

But our local, The Fort at Enfield, has new owners and a new menu.

Although they’re not usually open for lunch, at least not regularly, they were happy to cater for nine of us today.

It was good pub food and saved me from cooking for which I’m grateful.

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Word of the day

May 3, 2018

Partlet – a 16th century chemisette with a band or collar; a sleeveless garment worn over the neck and shoulders, or to fill in a low neckline; a hen; a woman.


Taste Pure Nature

May 3, 2018

Beef + Lamb NZ has launched a exciting blueprint and a new brand designed to capture more value for New Zealand’s sheepmeat and beef overseas:

Nature is the best producer of food, no question.

And in our remote, unspoilt corner of the world we enjoy some of nature’s best growing conditions.

Our climate is gentle, with clear blue skies and plentiful fresh rains that nourish young, fertile soils.

Our wide open spaces are brimming with lush, green grasses that animals roam through and graze on, freely and happily.

As farmers we work with these natural gifts to produce the one thing you can only get from New Zealand beef and lamb.

That’s the taste of pure nature. . . 

 

The aim is to differentiate New Zealand red meat:

. . . B+LNZ chief executive Sam McIvor said competing red meat exporters were investing heavily to differentiate their products.

“Australia, for example, invests around NZ$68 million per year in marketing its red meat based on the True Aussie brand and Ireland invests in its sustainability programme Origin Green.

“It’s critical New Zealand moves now to safeguard and enhance our position as a premium producer.”

The brand is built on the positive image consumers have of NZ but that same research showed consumer perception was weak in relation to marketing NZ red meat in high growth markets.

McIvor said research also showed a product’s country of origin was a major purchasing factor for consumers, retailers and the foodservice sector. 

“Taste Pure Nature is our unique point of difference and is central to our promise of the purest and most natural meat taste experiences in the world.” . . 

Companies wanting to use the trademarked Taste Pure Nature brand must apply for a licence and meet certain standards.

You can download a recipe book here and the brand journey here.


Rural round-up

May 3, 2018

Some immunity to virus confirmed – Pam Jones:

Central Otago farmers are still being encouraged to remain patient while the K5 variant continues to takes hold among the rabbit population, even though it has been confirmed some rabbits will be immune to the virus.

The Otago Regional Council announced the first rabbit deaths from RHDV1 K5 earlier this month, saying it was “excellent news” and patience from landowners had been “paying off”.

Omakau farmer and Federated Farmers high country Central Otago chairman Andrew Paterson said at the time it was important landowners were patient, as the regional council had warned interfering with the release programme could limit the spread of the virus in the long term and allow rabbits to build an immunity to the new strain.

Farmers threaten to shoot drones spooking animals:

Horse riders and farmers fed up with unmanned aerial drones traumatising animals want to start shooting them “out of the sky”.

After a Dannevirke horse-rider posted on social media about being harassed by a drone operated by an unseen person, a host of people suggested drones should, and could, be shot if they flew over a farm and were worrying animals.

When approached by Hawke’s Bay Today to clarify whether a drone could be legally shot at over a farm, the Police said a number of agencies, including CAA and the Privacy Commissioner, had a role to play in relation to the use of drones. . . 

Mangarara Family Farm tackles predators with high-flying support:

When Greg Hart’s family moved to Mangarara Station in Central Hawkes Bay in the mid 1990s, they shot 3 possums on their first night at the property – in a cabbage tree growing at the front door. How times have changed. Greg has now taken over the farm from his parents and his oldest son George, 14 years old, has never seen a possum on the farm.

“The Hawkes Bay Regional Council had a massive campaign to eradicate possums,” Greg explains. “They did an outstanding job. They did the initial knockdown and we do the ongoing control with bait stations. . .

Arable farmers consider their options after tough summer season:

Having come through a tough summer for growing crops and with current market signals muted, it appears arable farmers are pulling back on planned autumn plantings.

“The flat prices of the last few years are now rebounding a bit but growers remain hesitant to plant massive areas,” Federated Farmers Arable executive member Brian Leadley said. . .

Four vie for Horticulture New Zealand Board

Four candidates will vie for two positions on the Horticulture New Zealand Board as elections open today, with voting closing on 28 May 2018.

“We haven’t had such a strong contest for some time and the calibre of candidates is an indication of how well horticulture is doing and the high profile the industry is enjoying on the back of that success,” Horticulture New Zealand President Julian Raine says. . .

‘All we want are fair rules for farmers’ – Scott Kovacevic:

BEEF producer Ivan Naggs fears coastal farmers will find themselves hog-tied by red tape if new draft vegetation legislation becomes a reality under the State Government.

Mr Naggs, who has been a member of the Gympie and District Beef Liaison Group, said these laws had the potential to place severe restrictions on their operations.

Small farmers in particular would be left exposed. . . 


Thursday’s quiz

May 3, 2018

Everyone is invited to pose the questions.

Anyone who stumps everyone will win a virtual selection of Whitestone Cheese.


When does gossip become news?

May 3, 2018

Social media can be beneficial, it can be benign and it can be nothing more than a fast moving vehicle to bad mouth people.

Into the latter category falls the rumours that have been circulating for weeks that got so bad it prompted Police Commissioner Mike Bush to issue a statement scotching them.

On this issue I’m with Andrea Vance who tweeted:

She is right about the danger of reporting on rumours in social media, just as it would have been, and still is, unwise, potentially stupid and even courting defamation to report on gossip, from the pub or anywhere else.

The line between gossip and news has always been grey. The ease and speed at which something can spread on social media makes it even greyer.

Now that the Commissioner has made a statement, what happens next time there’s rumours? Will he make a statement and if not will that become a story?

It is dangerous territory for the police and media when gossip and rumours become news.

At both ends of the political spectrum are people, blinded by their own bigotry who will attempt to use character assassination with absolutely no concern about letting facts get in the way of their stories.

Mainstream media should not buy into it and anyone with integrity in politics wouldn’t go near it.

There is absolutely no need to be personal about the government or any of its members.

There is plenty in their actions and policies to pick on and it’s easy to point out their many defects without stooping to personal attacks and innuendo.

NB: If you’re commenting please do not write anything about the rumours or anything at all that could be defamatory.

I have deliberately not elaborated on the rumours or the subject and any comments that do will be deleted.


Quote of the day

May 3, 2018

One cannot and one must not try to erase the past merely because it doens’t fit the present – Golda Meir who was born on this day in 1898.


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