365 days of gratitude

April 21, 2018

If you can’t make it better, there is almost always a way to make it easier or, at the very least, less difficult.

Tonight I’m grateful for the direction and comfort in these words.

Advertisements

Word of the day

April 21, 2018

Genet – a catlike nocturnal mammal of the civet family with short legs, spotted fur, and a long bushy ringed tail, found in Africa, south west Europe, and Arabia;  any of several carnivorous mammals of the genus Genetta of Africa, Europe, and the Middle East, having grayish or yellowish fur with dark spots and a long ringed tail; the fur of the genet.


Saturday’s smiles

April 21, 2018

A few weeks after she’d bought a new ute, a car dealer rang her about buying a cow.

The farmers said the cow would cost about $500.

When the dealer came to the farm to check out the cow, she was handed an invoice which read:

Basic cow ………$500.00

Extra stomachs …..$79.25

Two-tone exterior . . …. $142.10

Deluxe dual horns ……$59.25

Produce storage compartments  ……$126.50

4-spigot high output drain system . . . . $149.20

Heavy-duty hay chopper  . . . $189.60

Automatic fly shatter . . . $88.50

Genuine cowhide upholstery . . . . . $179.90

Automatic fertiliser system ………. $339.40

4 x 4 traction drive assembly  ……. $884.16

Farmer adjustment ……….$300.00

Pre-delivery wash and groom ……. $69.80

Delivery ……… $35.75

Total price including option ……….$3,143.36.

 


Rural round-up

April 21, 2018

Rescue chopper services face axe – Neal Wallace:

About 1200 people marched through Taupo last week to protest against a threat to end their air ambulance service.

Taupo Mayor David Trewavas said the march attracted many people who owe their lives to the speed and efficient response of their local service.

“People are fired up and are pretty passionate just because of our geographic nature, being in the middle of the North Island.”

A Ministry of Health, ACC and National Ambulance Sector Office review says some air ambulance services should be cut. . . 

Rural health put on hold :

A rural mental health project run by the Rural Health Alliance Aotearoa will continue until June 30 before being wound up as the parent organisation is put in hibernation after failing to secure $600,000 in Government funding.

Alliance chief executive Michelle Thompson said it has run the rural mental health contract for the Ministry of Health for four years and she fears no one else will pick up the work. . .

North Canterbury sheep and beef farmers roll with the seasons – Heather Chalmers:

A North Canterbury farming couple are finding new opportunities after drought, writes Heather Chalmers.

North Canterbury hill country farmers Mark and Jane Schwass like to keep their options open when it comes to their sheep and beef farming operation.

The vagaries of the weather and market mean they are not fixed to any livestock class or sale plan.

The couple run a sheep and beef breeding and finishing operation as well as dairy support, grazing young dairy stock. . . 

SFF’s focus on directors – Sally Rae:

A review of Silver Fern Farms Co-operative Ltd’s constitution will include looking at the tenure of directors on the board, the board size and the ratio of elected to independent directors.
Speaking at the co-operative’s annual meeting in Dunedin yesterday, chairman Rob Hewett said the review was under way.

There would be roadshows for shareholders in June, ahead of a July-August vote. Any changes would require a vote of 75% in favour. . . 

Waikato sharemilker Laura Campbell will contest Melbourne Cup’s Fashion in the Field

Milking nearly 300 cows before going to the office, it’s all in a days work for a Waikato girl who just loves fashion.

Walking the pit of the 32-aside herringbone dairy shed is far removed from the lights and boardwalk Laura Campbell will experience at the Melbourne Cup Carnival this year.

The 22-year-old woman will be competing at the Myer’s Fashion in the Field across the ditch in earlier November. . . 

French MPs force vegetarian food producers to mince their words

French MPs have voted to ban producers of vegetarian meat substitutes from using words such as steak, bacon or sausage to describe their products if they are are not partly or wholly composed of meat.

The measure, approved on Thursday, was proposed by MP Jean-Baptiste Moreau, who argued that products such as soya steaks, vegan sausages and other vegetarian alternatives were “misleading” for consumers. Moreau based his argument on a 2017 judgment by the European court of justice, that ruled that soya and tofu products could not be marketed as milk or butter.

“It is important to combat false claims. Our products must be designated correctly: the terms of #cheese or #steak will be reserved for products of animal origin,” tweeted Moreau, a farmer and member of president Emmanuel Macron’s political movement La République En Marche. . . 


What next?

April 21, 2018

The government says ending oil and gas exploration in New Zealand is a plan.

It’s at best only half a plan because it doesn’t say what we replace the oil and gas we need with.


Saturday soapbox

April 21, 2018

Saturday’s soapbox is yours to use as you will – within the bounds of decency and absence of defamation. You’re welcome to look back or forward, discuss issues of the moment, to pontificate, ponder or point us to something of interest, to educate, elucidate or entertain, amuse, bemuse or simply muse, but not abuse.

Image result for john mortimer quotes

“Rumpole, you must move with the times.” “If I don’t like the way the times are moving, I shall refuse to accompany them. – John Mortimer.


April 21 in history

April 21, 2018

753 BC – Romulus and Remus founded Rome (traditional date).

43 BC Battle of Mutina: Mark Antony was again defeated in battle by Aulus Hirtius, who was killed.

1509  Henry VIII ascended the throne of England on the death of his father, Henry VII.

1519 Hernán Cortés landed in Veracruz.

1651 Blessed Joseph Vaz, Apostle of Ceylon, was born.

1671 John Law, Scottish economist, was born  (d. 1729) .

1729 Catherine II of Russia, known as ‘Catherine the Great’, was born  (d. 1796) .

1792 Tiradentes, a revolutionary leading a movement for Brazil’s independence, was hung, drawn and quartered.

1809 Two Austrian army corps were driven from Landshut by a First French Empire army led by Napoleon I of France as two French corps to the north held off the main Austrian army on the first day of the Battle of Eckmühl.

1816  Charlotte Brontë, English author, was born  (d. 1855) .

1836 Texas Revolution: The Battle of San Jacinto – Republic of Texas forces under Sam Houston defeated troops under Mexican General Antonio López de Santa Anna.

1838 John Muir, Scottish environmentalist, was born (d. 1914) .

1863 Bahá’u’lláh, considered the founder of the Bahá’í Faith, declared his mission as “He whom God shall make manifest“.

1894 Norway formally adopted the Krag-Jørgensen rifle as the main arm of its armed forces, a weapon that would remain in service for almost 50 years.

1898 Spanish-American War: The U.S. Congress, recognised that a state of war existed between the United States and Spain.

1915 Anthony Quinn, Mexican-born American actor, was born (2001) .

1918 World War I: German fighter ace Manfred von Richthofen, known as “The Red Baron”, was shot down and killed over Vaux sur Somme.

1922 The first Aggie Muster was held as a remembrance for fellow Aggies who had died in the previous year.

1923 John Mortimer, English barrister and writer, was born (d. 2009) .

Rumpole.png

1926  Queen Elizabeth II was born.

1942 World War II: The most famous (and first international) Aggie Musterwas held on the Philippine island of Corregidor, by Brigadier General George F. Moore (with 25 fellow Aggies who are under his command), while 1.8 million pounds of shells pounded the island over a 5 hour attack.

1952 Secretary’s Day (now Administrative Professionals’ Day) was first celebrated.

1959 Robert Smith, British musician (The Cure), was born.

1960 Brasília, Brazil’s capital, was officially inaugurated. At 9:30 am the Three Powers of the Republic were simultaneously transferred from the old capital, Rio de Janeiro.

1960 – Founding of the Orthodox Bahá’í Faith in Washington, D.C.

1961 The first Golden Shears contest was held – won by Ivan Bowen.

First Golden Shears competition

1962 The Seattle World’s Fair (Century 21 Exposition) opened – the first World’s Fair in the United States since World War II.

1963 The Universal House of Justice of the Bahá’í Faith was elected for the first time.

1964 A Transit-5bn satellite failed to reach orbit after launch; as it re-entered the atmosphere, 2.1 pounds of radioactive plutonium in its SNAPRTG power source was widely dispersed.

1965 The 1964-1965 New York World’s Fair opened for its second and final season.

1966  Rastafari movement: Haile Selassie of Ethiopia visited Jamaica, an event now celebrated as Grounation Day.

1967  A few days before the general election in Greece, Colonel George Papadopoulos led a coup d’état, establishing a military regime that lasted for seven years.

1970 The Hutt River Province Principality seceded from Australia.

1971 – The Court Theatre staged its first play.

Court Theatre stages first play

1975  Vietnam War: President of South Vietnam Nguyen Van Thieu fled Saigon, as Xuan Loc, the last South Vietnamese outpost blocking a direct North Vietnamese assault on Saigon, fell.

1987 Tamil Tigers were blamed for a car bomb that exploded in Colombo, killing 106 people.

1989 – Tiananmen Square Protests: In Beijing, around 100,000 students gathered in Tiananmen Square to commemorate Chinese reform leader Hu Yaobang.

1993 – The Supreme Court in La Paz, Bolivia, sentenced former dictatorLuis Garcia Meza to 30 years in jail without parole for murder, theft, fraud and violating the constitution.

1994 – The first discoveries of extrasolar planets were announced by astronomer Alexander Wolszczan.

2004 – Five suicide car bombers targeted police stations in and around Basra, killing 74 people and wounding 160.

2010 – The controversia Kharkiv Pact (Russian Ukrainian Naval Base for Gas Treaty) was signed in Kharkiv, Ukraine, by Ukrainian PresidentViktorYanukovych and Russian PresidentDimitryMedvedev.

2012 – Two trains were involved in a head-on collision near Sloterdijk, Amsterdam, in the Netherlands, injuring 116 people.

2014 – The American city of Flint, Michigan  switched its water source to the Flint River beginning the ongoing Flint water crisis which caused lead poisoning in up to 12,000 people, and 15 deaths from Legionnaires disease, ultimately leading to criminal indictments against 15 people, five of whom have been charged with involuntary manslaughter.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


%d bloggers like this: