365 days of gratitude

April 20, 2018

My mother heard a recipe for soufflé on the radio, tried it, found it was delicious, shared the recipe with me and I’ve cooked it often.

Shortly after getting the soufflé recipe I came across a recipe for roulade, found it was delicious and I’ve cooked it often too.

Both are similar – separate eggs, beat whites, make a white sauce, stir in yolks then fold in the beaten whites.

The main difference is in how they’re cooked – the roulade in a sponge roll tin so it can be filled and rolled when it’s cooked, and the soufflé in a soufflé dish with a collar of paper which allows it to rise.

But there is another difference – the roulade has less flour than the soufflé.

I usually double the recipe when I make either of them but today with just my farmer and me for lunch I opted for a single recipe for the soufflé.

I’ve made it so often I can do it from memory. Once it was safely in the oven I remembered a friend asked me to email her the recipe, decided I should check the ingredients, I found the little red note book in which the recipe is written and realised I’d halved the amount of flour I used.

Soufflés are reputed to be temperamental and altering the amount of an ingredient isn’t recommended.

However, in spite of less flour than it ought to have, the soufflé rose and tasted for fine.

I wouldn’t recommend doing that again, but I’m grateful it worked this time, though it didn’t look quite as good as this one which had the correct amount of flour.

 

 

 

 

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Word of the day

April 20, 2018

Blandiloquent –  speaking in a flattering or ingratiating way.


Rural round-up

April 20, 2018

Irrigators should spread good news – Pam Jones:

Responsible irrigators need to spread the word about good work being done in the primary sector, Central Otago Mayor Tim Cadogan says.

Mr Cadogan, who spoke at the opening of the Irrigation New Zealand conference in Alexandra yesterday, said the primary and irrigation sectors were “under pressure” from the public to act responsibly, but did not court publicity and the public therefore sometimes did not know about their positive actions.

Irrigators should not be afraid to “tell the good news”, Mr Cadogan said.

He said it was important for the public to realise there was no direct line between irrigation and degradation of land and water quality, and there was sometimes a disconnect between town and country. . . 

Smarter data push for irrigation – Tom Kitchin:

Data can make irrigation more efficient, Animation Research Ltd owner Ian Taylor told the third and final day of a national body conference yesterday.

Mr Taylor made the point at the 2018 Irrigation New Zealand Conference and Expo in Alexandra yesterday.

“Water is one of the most valuable resources. How can [farmers] manage it more efficiently and how are they held accountable for ways to manage it? Technology has the tools that will allow us to do that,” he said. . . 

Unlisted celebrates first $1 bln issue as Zespri resumes trading after 2018 Gold3 tender – Jonathan Underhill:

(BusinessDesk) – Zespri Group’s shares rose to a record when they resumed trading, after being halted for the 2018 allocation of Gold3 kiwifruit licences, pushing the kiwifruit exporter’s market capitalisation to $1.1 billion and making it the first $1 billion company on the Unlisted platform.

Some 16,860 Zespri shares traded today, of which 2,440 changes hands at a record $8.35. The shares first traded at $1.75 after Zespri listed on the Unlisted Securities Exchange in February 2016. . . 

Arden-Peters raid on regionans ramps up:

The Government’s raid on regional New Zealand is ramping up, with Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor telling farmers they’ll be taxed thousands for carbon emissions, National’s Nathan Guy and Todd Muller say.

“Mr O’Connor has reportedly told East Coast farmers they’ll be taxed around $5000 to offset their carbon emissions,” National’s Agriculture spokesperson Nathan Guy says.

“He’s pulling numbers out of the air before the interim Climate Change Committee even begins its work. . . 

Let’s protect our valuable soils, Horticulture New Zealand:

The need to protect New Zealand’s best soils for growing healthy fresh fruit and vegetables is clear in the Our land 2018 report released today, says Horticulture New Zealand chief executive Mike Chapman.

“This report highlights the expansion in urban areas (a 10 percent increase between 1996 and 2012) and the accompanying loss of some of our most versatile land.

“We have been talking to Government about this issue in Pukekohe, near Auckland, as well as other prime growing areas for fruit and vegetables. Some of this soil is unique, particularly the volcanic soils around Pukekohe where vegetables can be grown all year in a frost free environment. This area feeds a lot of New Zealand. . . 

Te Rapa celebrates 50 years:

For over half a century Te Rapa has been a place of work, a producer of world class dairy, a supportive community and, for some, it has even been home.  

Te Rapa’s official opening on April 20, 1968, was a milestone which represented the confidence the New Zealand Co-Operative Dairy Company (now Fonterra) had in the productive Waikato, it’s dairy farming community and its role in the national economy.

“We had a real sense of community living in that village. There was a swimming pool, tennis courts, a rugby field and always plenty to do when you weren’t working. We had inter-factory rugby and netball competitions in the off season.”  Brian Whittington remembers when the site was being built and moving into the small village on site where 35 key staff members were housed. . . 


Friday’s answers

April 20, 2018

Andrei and Teletext get my thanks for posing Thursday’s questions and can claim a virtual batch of apples muffins by leaving the answers below.


75 and counting

April 20, 2018

The government has established 75 inquiries, reference and working groups – that’s nearly one every two days since it was sworn in.

National Party Leader Simon Bridges says after just six months the Government’s tally of inquiries, reference and working groups has soared to 75 as it desperately tries to compensate for its inability to think for itself or put in the work.

“After nine years in Opposition claiming they knew better, Labour, NZ First and the Greens put in so little work and came up with so few ideas they’re now outsourcing the job of running the country to consultants – wasting tens of millions of dollars in taxpayers funds in the process.

Labour never looked like a government in waiting when it was in opposition. It spent more time sabotaging itself than developing policy.

We paid for them to waste nine years on internal bickering and now we’re paying for inquiries, reference and working groups to do the work they should have done themselves.

“There is now, after just six months, 75 different groups of people telling the Government what it should be doing. That’s more working groups than MPs in the entire government.

“It’s nothing short of an abdication of its responsibility to lead and it shows how completely out of its depth the Government really is – and how willing it is to waste taxpayers money which should be invested in areas like health and education.

A few reviews or working groups of suitably qualified people, without partisan agendas, could lead to better policy, but more groups than MPs is many times more than should be needed.

“What we are now certain of is when Jacinda Ardern claimed in Opposition she could slash immigration without harming New Zealand businesses, balance the books without raising taxes and build more houses she wasn’t telling the truth. They had no clue then and they have no idea now.

“What is even more concerning for New Zealanders is when this Government has implemented its own, ill-thought through ideas they’ve been bad for New Zealand.

“Raiding our regions through fuel taxes, fewer roads and pulling the plug on important irrigation projects, putting a wrecking ball through entire industries like oil and gas and slowing our economy through low-growth policies like empowering unions and slashing foreign investment.

“These do nothing but take New Zealand backwards and undermine an economy which is delivering for all New Zealanders.

“Every day this Government is proving to New Zealanders it doesn’t have the ability to run the country, the ideas to take it forward or the best interests of New Zealanders at heart.

“National won’t make the same mistake. We’re working hard in the interests of New Zealanders and we’ll be ready with plans and policies if we earn the right to govern again in 2020.”

You can see the list of working groups and reviews here.

As this video points out – Labour has gone from let’s do this to let someone else do this.

 


Quote of the day

April 20, 2018

What I am looking for… is an immobile movement, something which would be the equivalent of what is called the eloquence of silence, or what St. John of the Cross, I think it was, described with the term ‘mute music’.  –   Joan Miró who was born on this day in 1893.


April 20 in history

April 20, 2018

1303 The University of Rome La Sapienza was instituted by Pope Boniface VIII.

1453 The last naval battle in Byzantine history when three Genoese galleys escorting a Byzantine transport fought their way through the huge Ottoman blockade fleet and into the Golden Horn.

1494 Johannes Agricola, German Protestant reformer was born (d. 1566) .

1534  Jacques Cartier began the voyage during which he discovered Canada and Labrador.

1535 The Sun Dog phenomenon observed over Stockholm and depicted in the famous painting “Vädersolstavlan

1653  Oliver Cromwell dissolved the Rump Parliament.

1657 Admiral Robert Blake destroyed a Spanish silver fleet under heavy fire at Santa Cruz de Tenerife.

1657  Freedom of religion  was granted to the Jews of New Amsterdam (later New York City).

1689 The former King James II of England,  then deposed, lay siege to Derry.

1775 American Revolutionary War: the Siege of Boston began.

1792 France declared war on Austria, beginning of French Revolutionary Wars.

1809 Two Austrian army corps in Bavaria are defeated by a First French Empire army led by Napoleon I of France at the Battle of Abensberg on the second day of a four day campaign which ended in a French victory.

1810 The Governor of Caracas declared independence from Spain.

1828 René Caillié became the first non-Muslim to enter Timbouctou.

1861 American Civil War: Robert E. Lee resigned his commission in the United States Army in order to command the forces of the state of Virginia.

1862 Louis Pasteur and Claude Bernard completed the first pasteurisation tests.

1871 The Civil Rights Act of 1871 became law.

1884 Pope Leo XIII published the encyclical Humanum Genus.

1889 Adolf Hitler, German Nazi dictator, was born  (d. 1945) .

1893 Joan Miró, Spanish painter, was born  (d. 1983).

1902 Pierre and Marie Curie refined radium chloride.

1914 Forty-five men, women, and children died in the Ludlow Massacreduring a Colorado coal-miner’s strike.

1918 Manfred von Richthofen, aka The Red Baron, shot down his 79th and 80th victims marking his final victories before his death the following day.

1926 Western Electric and Warner Bros. announced Vitaphone, a process to add sound to film.

1939  Billie Holiday recorded the first Civil Rights song “Strange Fruit“.

1939 – Gro Harlem Brundtland, Norwegian physician and politician, 22nd Prime Minister of Norway, was born.

1941  Ryan O’Neal, American actor, was born.

1945  World War II: US troops captured Leipzig, Germany.

1945 World War II: Fuehrerbunker: Adolf Hitler made his last trip to the surface to award Iron Crosses to boy soldiers of the Hitler Youth.

1945 – Thein Sein, Burmese general and politician, 8th President of Burma, was born.

1948 – Hugh Roberts, English historian and curator, was born.

1948 Craig Frost, American musician (Grand Funk & Bob Seger), was born.

1949 – Massimo D’Alema, Italian journalist and politician, 76th Prime Minister of Italy, was born.

1949  Jessica Lange, American actress, was born.

1953 Sebastian Faulks, British novelist, was born.

1958  The first temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in the Southern Hemisphere opened in Hamilton.

Mormon temple opens in Hamilton

1961 Failure of the Bay of Pigs Invasion of US-backed troops against Cuba.

1964  BBC Two launched with the power cut because of the fire at Battersea Power Station.

1968  Enoch Powell made his controversial Rivers of Blood speech.

1972 Apollo 16 landed on the moon commanded by John Young.

1978  Korean Air Flight 902 was shot down by Soviets.

1980 Climax of Berber Spring in Algeria as hundreds of Berber political activists were arrested.

1981 – Alison Roe won the Boston Marathon.
Allison Roe wins Boston marathon
1985 ATF raid on The Covenant, The Sword, and the Arm of the Lord compound in northern Arkansas.

1986 Pianist Vladimir Horowitz performed in his native Russia for the first time in 61 years.

1986 Cameron Duncan, New Zealand director, was born.

1986 Professional basketball player Michael Jordan set a record for points in an NBA playoff game with 63 against the Boston Celtics.

1998 German terrorist group Red Army Faction announced their dissolution after 28 years.

1999 Columbine High School massacreEric Harris and Dylan Klebold killed 13 people and injure 24 others before committing suicide at Columbine High School in Jefferson County, Colorado.

2007 Johnson Space Center Shooting: A man with a handgun barricaded himself in NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston before killing a male hostage and himself.

2008 Danica Patrick won the Indy Japan 300 becoming the first female driver in history to win an Indy car race.

2010 – Deepwater Horizon drilling rig explosion killed 11 and causes rig to sink, initiating a massive oil discharge in the Gulf of Mexico.

2012 – One hundred twenty-seven people were killed when a plane crashed in a residential area near the Benazir Bhutto International Airportnear IslamabadPakistan.

2013 – Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant’s – last reactor was shut down at midnight.

2013 – A 6.6-magnitude earthquake struck Lushan County, Ya’an, in China’s Sichuan province, killing more than 150 people and injuring thousands.

2015 – 10 people were killed in a bomb attack on a convoy carrying food supplies to a United Nations compound in Garowe in the Somali region of Puntland.

Sourced from NZ History Online and Wikipedia


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