365 days of gratitude

March 23, 2018

When it rains look for rainbows. When it’s dark, look for stars.

Today I”m grateful for rainbows and stars.


Word of the day

March 23, 2018

Misandry – dislike or hatred of, contempt for, or ingrained prejudice against men and males.


Rural round-up

March 23, 2018

Gore couple win top sharemilking award :

Gore couple Simon and Hilary Vallely have been named share farmers of the year in the Southland-Otago Dairy Industry Awards.
The awards function was held last night at Bill Richardson Transport World in Invercargill.

Mr and Mrs Vallely, both 31, are 50:50 sharemilking 475 cows on David and Valerie Stafford’s 160ha farm.

They believed strong relationships with all people they dealt with were the key to their successful business. . .

Departing Fonterra chief executive has taken the company forward – Christine McKay:

Fonterra’s departing chief executive Theo Spierings has been a strong leader, Tararua Federated Farmer’s president Neil Filer says.

Mr Filer, who is also the Tararua group’s dairy spokesman, told the Dannevirke News Spierings had moved Fonterra to a value-added space, which was good for dairy farmers.

“He’s done a good job since he began,” Filer said.

Spierings has not named a date for his departure after seven years, but Fonterra board chairman John Wilson said he had made an “extraordinary” contribution while in the job. . . 

Kiwi butchers finish second on world stage:

New Zealand’s butchery team, The Pure South Sharp Blacks, just missed out on being crowned world champions yesterday after finishing runners up at the World Butchers’ Challenge in Belfast, Northern Ireland.

Team Ireland, the host nation took the top spot in a tense battle of the butchers with the Aussies – the Australian Steelers – finishing third… to the delight of many this side of the ditch.

Website to find workers praised:

Demand for horticulture workers is higher than the number of people available, Horticulture New Zealand chief executive Mike Chapman says.

He applauded the Work The Seasons website launched on Friday by the Ministry of Social Development. It gave growers access to more workers and gave people looking for work the chance to see what great opportunities existed in horticulture, ”not only for seasonal work, but also for permanent work and a lasting career”, Mr Chapman said. . 

 

Telemedicine – keeping Kiwis well closer to home:

Dr Ben Wheeler is running remote diabetes clinics for rural Otago families, saving them the long trip to Dunedin.

Type one diabetes is the second most common chronic condition in children, after asthma. In my region, from South Canterbury to Stewart Island, there are up to 200 children and young people with diabetes. Being a kid with diabetes is no fun. You have to be careful about what you eat, put up with finger prick blood tests and injections every day, and often wear a bulky insulin pump under your clothes. When I first started working here, children with diabetes in Otago had to make the trip to Dunedin every three months, sometimes more often, to see me for their clinic. For some families that meant a round trip of up to nine hours. It meant mum and dad having to take a day off work – sometimes two days, if they had to stay overnight. Often brothers and sisters would need to come too, with everyone missing school – all this for a half-hour consultation. . . 

When the death of a family farm leads to suicide -Corey Kilgannon:

Fred Morgan was already deep in debt from rebuilding his milking barn after a fire when milk prices plunged in 2015, setting off an economic drought that is now entering its fourth year — the worst in recent memory for dairy farmers in New York State.

Mr. Morgan, 50, saw no way to save the dairy farm in central New York State that he took over as a teenager from his ailing father and ran with his wife, Judy, and their son, Cody.

With the farm operating at a loss and facing foreclosure, Mr. Morgan believed his only solution was his $150,000 life insurance policy. He said he planned on killing himself so his family could receive the payout.

“I’d sacrifice my life so my family could keep the farm,” Mr. Morgan said. His wife persuaded him otherwise. . .

Those who work ina cares not hours and those who feed others before themselves . . .thank you. #NationalAgDay


Friday’s answers

March 23, 2018

Teletext gets my thanks for posing Friday’s questions and can claim a virtual case of nectarines for stumping everyone by leaving the answers below.


Loshni Manikam Fonterra Dairy Woman of Year

March 23, 2018

Southland dairy leadership coach Loshni Manikam is the 2018 Fonterra Dairy Woman of the Year.

The human behaviour and leadership expert took out the 2018 title from an impressive line-up which included Tararua district mayor Tracey Collis and Hawke’s Bay dairy consultant Rachel Baker. The awards ceremony was held last night in Rotorua as part of a gala dinner at the Dairy Women’s Network’s annual conference, which also marked the Network’s 20th year.

Manikam, originally from South Africa, milks 600 cows with her husband and three children in Winton, Southland. In 2007 they were named Southland Sharemilker of the Year, before progressing to their current equity partnership.

A former lawyer, Manikam transitioned from dairy farming to leadership coaching after receiving her coach certification in 2012. She is the founding director of Iceberg Coaching and a strategic consultant for Farmstrong, working to support the wellbeing of farming communities.

She is a trustee of the Southern Dairy Development Trust, a coach and facilitator of the Agri-Women’s Development Trust’s Escalator Programme, and a Federated Farmers Southland executive member.

Dairy Women’s Network CEO Zelda de Villiers says Manikam has a unique ability to engage with communities and stakeholders at a range of levels.

“What stood out to us was Loshni’s dedication to growing leadership among farming communities, and her determination to change the headspace in which farmers operate – that they are more than what they do, they are not just their farms and their bottom lines,” says de Villiers.

“Loshni strives to be part of change in the industry, and she combines her grassroots experience and enthusiasm with her ability to engage at the highest levels. She is well-deserving of the Fonterra Dairy Woman of the Year title.”

Manikam says receiving the title is proof positive that the success of “an ordinary dairy farming woman” can translate far and wide. “It shows you can raise a family and still progress through the industry, reach the top, and have a say at industry level,” she says.

She says it’s an honour to be recognised for her work. “I am most passionate about people and their untapped potential. It really excites me how growing people’s awareness of their own strengths has such a positive and far-reaching impact on everyone around them.

“I see a real need in our industry to better understand the importance and benefits – both financial and non-financial – of prioritising and developing people.

“I’m passionate about effecting change by working alongside industry leaders and farming communities. I think it’s important to first build relationships and understand each group’s drivers before collaborating for change, and I hope the Fonterra Dairy Woman of the Year title will allow a few more doors to open to allow that to keep happening.”

As Fonterra Dairy Woman of the Year, Manikam receives a scholarship prize of up to $20,000 to undertake a professional/business development programme, sponsored by Fonterra.

The award was presented by Miles Hurrell, Chief Operating Officer at Fonterra. He says the award, and associated scholarship, is an investment in the future of New Zealand dairy farming.

“We are proud to support, celebrate and help develop the women in dairying who, like Fonterra, set high standards for themselves and for our industry,” says Mr Hurrell.

“Loshni is another outstanding dairy woman to add to the ranks of previous recipients of the Fonterra Dairy Woman of the Year award. On behalf of Fonterra I wish her all the best and I have no doubt we will see more great things from her in the near future. I would also like to congratulate the other finalists Tracey and Rachel and acknowledge the contribution they have made, and continue to make, to our industry.”

 


Green Minister ageist, racist, sexist

March 23, 2018

Is discriminating against anyone on the grounds of age, race or gender ever okay?

Women’s Minister Julie Anne Genter says old white men need to “move on” from company boards to help close the gender pay gap.

Speaking to students at Christchurch’s Cobham Intermediate School on Thursday, Genter said the private sector needed to address the low level of female representation on New Zealand company boards if more businesses were to be led by women.

About 85 per cent of board members were male, and many were “old white men in their 60s”.

Some of them need to move on and allow for diversity and new talent,” she said, later clarifying she had “no problem with old white men” on company boards generally. . . 

I wouldn’t say 60 is old. Even if it is, ageism, racism and sexism isn’t a good look in a Minister who is supposed to be working towards equality.

It’s worse from someone whose party’s values include :

Engage respectfully, without personal attacks
Actively respect cultural and individual diversity and celebrate difference
Enable participation with dignity and challenge oppression
Encourage new voices and cherish wisdom

Diversity on boards does have benefits.

But a Minister ought to be able to make the case for that without disparaging anyone on the grounds of their age, race or gender.

If discrimination against people on the basis of such factors is wrong for the young, those whose skins aren’t white and/or are women it’s wrong for everyone else too.

If Genter can’t help women up without pulling, and putting, men down, she’s in the wrong job.

If misogyny is a problem misandry is not the solution.


Paying cost of lack of preparedness

March 23, 2018

Labour wasn’t prepared for opposition when John Key led the National Party to its election win in 2008.

Nor was it prepared for government when Winston Peters anointed it last year.

It wasted nine years in opposition, wracked by internal dissent, spending a lot more time on leadership wrangles than policy development.

It didn’t expect to win last year’s election and so made stupid promises, like the fees-free tertiary education, it didn’t think it would have to keep.

The price for Labour’s lack of preparedness is a policy vacuum  which Checkpoint points out it has filled with reviews, working groups, advisory groups and investigations.

Ministers have announced 39 of those in three months – one every four days.

A few might be acceptable, even wise, for a new government, 39 is not.

Instead of a government of action we’ve got one  of inaction and prevarication.

Instead of governing, it’s marking time while it marshalls the policies it ought to have been working on in opposition.

a


%d bloggers like this: