365 days of gratitude

March 17, 2018

Highlanders 25 – Crusaders 18.

A hard game, a good one for spectators and a well deserved win.

So many times the Highlanders win the first half but the Crusaders win the second.

Tonight the blue and gold team held on to its lead for which I’m grateful.


Word of the day

March 17, 2018

Comhluadar – convivial company; conviviality; family.


Kimi Ora school – how could Fonterra and Richie resist?

March 17, 2018

Fonterra is celebrating five years of its milk in schools initiative by asking Fonterra ambassador, Richie McCaw, to make some special milk deliveries by helicopter to four lucky primary schools around the country.

How could they not visit not visit Kimi Ora School after this video starring Blaze Petuha:

You can read about the reaction to the video here.


Saturday’s smiles

March 17, 2018

A priest was driving somewhat erratically through the streets of Dublin when he was stopped by a police officer.

The officer smelt alcohol on the priest’s breath and then saw an empty bottle on the floor of the car.

“Father,” he said, “have you been drinking?”

“Just water,” the priest replied.

The officer said, “Then why do I smell wine?”

The priest picked up the bottle, sniffed it and said, “Good Lord! He’s done it again!”


Rural round-up

March 17, 2018

Dairy Report: Irrigation in the South Island insulated dairy farms from drought this year allowing maintained production. North Island makes a fast recovery – Guy Trafford:

Fonterra states it has collected 2% less milk than the previous season. However, given it was 6% down up to the end of December on the previous calendar year and January was 8% down, since that period there must have be a great turn around.

This is no doubt driven by the good grass season experienced by farmers in many parts of New Zealand since mid-January and dairy farmers holding onto potentially cull cows to help control it.

Looking at the Fonterra milk collection data it appears likely that by April the 2017/18 season will come close to matching that of previous years. Most of the volatility around milk production is coming from the North Island with irrigation maintaining much of the South Island production at a status quo situation. . . 

Dairy capacity is manageable – Hugh Stringleman:

The latest milk market share figures show that Fonterra is approaching 80% of national milk collection at a time when dairy industry processing overcapacity is an emerging threat.

Two new dairy plants are due to open in August and if their operators attract their targeted milk supply Fonterra’s market share next season will fall from 82% to 80%.

The plants are industry number two Open Country’s fourth location, at Horotiu, in northern Waikato, and newcomer Mataura Valley Milk, in Southland. . . 

Project offers school children farm visits – Sally Rae:

Farming is not all about chasing sheep.

That was something Deep Stream farmer Preston Hope explained to a group of 29 city school pupils visiting his property yesterday.

Rather, there were a wealth of various career paths available in the rural sector, ranging from science to sales and marketing.

“There are a huge amount of opportunities,” he said. . . 

Lorna’s love of cows rewarded – Sally Rae:

Lorna Button started showing cattle at a very young age.

Miss Button (17) reckoned she was probably 4 or 5 when she first wielded a halter and lead, and paraded around the ring.

In fact, there were photographs from when she was young, showing her holding her charge’s head “right up high” and it was right above her head, she said.

This year, a highlight for the South Otago teenager was winning the intermediate-senior handler (14-18 years) class at the New Zealand Dairy Event, held at Manfeild Park, near Palmerston North. . .

Zespri shareholders back constitutional changes according to preliminary vote count – Rebecca Howard:

(BusinessDesk) – Zespri shareholders voted in favor of constitutional changes aimed at strengthening grower ownership and control of New Zealand’s statutory kiwifruit exporter, according to preliminary results from a special meeting held today in Mt Maunganui.

Shareholders voted on a series of resolutions that will impose a cap on the number of shares they can hold relative to trays of kiwifruit produced, and phase out dividends for non-producing shareholders over seven years. .  . 

National Farmers’ Union first female boss addresses sexism in farming – Adrian Lee:

FOR centuries farming’s image has revolved around ruddy-faced men toiling in fields while their loyal women folk run the home. It is a stereotype that has proved hard to break down.

However the election of the National Farmers’ Union’s first female president in its 110-year history will do much to prove that attitudes within the industry are changing. Minette Batters, who built up a 300-strong herd of pedigree Hereford cattle from scratch in Wiltshire, fought off male competition to secure the post this week.

She was told by her father that farming is not for girls but insists that agriculture as a man’s domain is being consigned to the past. “That really is a very out of date opinion,” says the 50-year-old single mother who took charge of the farm in 1998 and has steadily worked her way to the top. . .

 


Saturday soapbox

March 17, 2018

Saturday’s soapbox is yours to use as you will – within the bounds of decency and absence of defamation. You’re welcome to look back or forward, discuss issues of the moment, to pontificate, ponder or point us to something of interest, to educate, elucidate or entertain, amuse, bemuse or simply muse, but not abuse.

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You’re going to feel like hell if you wake up someday and you never wrote the stuff that is tugging on the sleeves of your heart: your stories, memories, visions and songs – your truth, your version of things – in your own voice. That’s really all you have to offer us, and that’s also why you were born. – Anne Lamott


March 17 in history

March 17, 2018

45 BC Julius Caesar defeated the Pompeian forces of Titus Labienus and Pompey the Younger in the Battle of Munda.

180 Marcus Aurelius died leaving Commodus as the sole emperor of the Roman Empire.

624 Led by Muhammad, the Muslims of Medina defeated the Quraysh of Mecca in the Battle of Badr.

1337 Edward, the Black Prince was made Duke of Cornwall, the first Duchy made in England.

1473 King James IV of Scotland was born (d. 1513).

1756 Saint Patrick’s Day was celebrated in New York City for the first time (at the Crown and Thistle Tavern).

1776 American Revolution: British forces evacuated Boston, Massachusetts after George Washington and Henry Knox placed artillery overlooking the city.

1780 American Revolution: George Washington granted the Continental Army a holiday “as an act of solidarity with the Irish in their fight for independence”.

1805 The Italian Republic, with Napoleon as president, became theKingdom of Italy, with Napoleon as King.

1834 Gottlieb Daimler, German engineer and inventor was born (d. 1900).

1845 The rubber band was patented.

1846 Kate Greenaway, English children’s author and illustrator, was born (d. 1901).

1860 The opening shots of the first Taranaki War were fired when imperial troops attacked a pa built by the Te Ati Awa chief Te Rangitake at Te Kohia.

First Taranaki war erupts at Waitara

1861 The Kingdom of Italy (1861-1946) was proclaimed.

1864 Joseph Baptista Indian Home Rule founder was born  (d. 1930).

1880 Lawrence Oates, English army officer and Antarctic explorer, was born (d. 1912).

1905 – The only surviving Maungatautari Bank cheque was issued.

Only surviving Maungatautari Bank cheque issued

1919 Nat King Cole, American singer, was born (d. 1965).

1920 Sheikh Mujibur Rahman, Founding Leader of Bangladesh, was born (d. 1975).

1938 Rudolf Nureyev, Russian-born dancer and choreographer, was born (d. 1993).

1938 Zola Taylor, American singer (The Platters), was born  (d. 2007).

1939 Battle of Nanchang between the Kuomintang and Japan started.

1941 The National Gallery of Art in Washington DC was officially opened by President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

1941 Paul Kantner, American musician (Jefferson Airplane) was born.

1942 The first Jews from the Lviv Ghetto were gassed at the Belzec death camp (eastern Poland).

1945 The Ludendorff Bridge in Remagen, Germany collapsed, ten days after its capture.

1947 First flight of the B-45 Tornado strategic bomber.

1948 Benelux, France and the United Kingdom signed the Treaty of Brussels.

1950  Researchers at the University of California announced the creation of element 98, which they named “Californium.”

1951 Scott Gorham, American musician (Thin Lizzywas born.

1954 Lesley-Anne Down, English actress, was born.

1957 A plane crash in Cebu killed Philippine President Ramon Magsaysayand 24 others.

1958 The United States launched the Vanguard 1 satellite.

1959 Tenzin Gyatso, the 14th Dalai Lama, fled Tibet for India.

1960 U.S. President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed the National Security Council directive on the anti-Cuban covert action programme that led to the Bay of Pigs Invasion.

1966  Off the coast of Spain, the Alvin submarine found a missing American hydrogen bomb.

1967 Billy Corgan, American musician (Smashing Pumpkins), was born.

1969 Alexander McQueen, British fashion designer, was born (d. 2010).

1969 Golda Meir became the first female Prime Minister of Israel.

1970 My Lai Massacre: The United States Army charged 14 officers with suppressing information related to the incident.

1973 The Pulitzer Prize-winning photograph Burst of Joy was taken, depicting a former prisoner of war being reunited with his family.

1976 Stephen Gately, Irish singer, musician, and actor (Boyzone) was born (d. 2009).

1979 The Penmanshiel Tunnel collapsed during engineering works, killing two workers.

1988 A Colombian Boeing 727 jetliner, Avianca Flight 410, crashed into a mountainside near the Venezuelan border killing 143.

1988 Eritrean War of Independence: The Nadew Command, an Ethiopian army corps in Eritrea, was attacked on three sides by military units of the Eritrean People’s Liberation Front in the opening action of the Battle of Afabet.

1992 Israeli Embassy attack in Buenos Aires: Suicide car bomb attack killed 29 and injured 242.

2000 More than 800 members of the Ugandan cult Movement for the Restoration of the Ten Commandments of God died in a mass murder and suicide orchestrated by leaders of the cult.

2003 Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs Robin Cook, resigned from the British Cabinet over his disagreement with government plans for the war with Iraq.

2004 –  Unrest in Kosovo: More than 22 killed, 200 wounded, and the destruction of 35 Serbian Orthodox shrines in Kosovo and two mosques in Belgrade and Nis.

2008 – Governor of New York Eliot Spitzer resigned after a scandal involving a high-end prostitute. Lieutenant Governor David Patersonbecame New York State governor.

2011 – Libyan civil war: The United Nations Security Council adoptedUnited Nations Security Council Resolution 1973, authorising a military intervention by member states to protect civilians in the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya.

2013 – The largest meteorite (since NASA started observing the moon in 2005) hit the moon.

Sourced from NZ History and Wikipedia.


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