365 days of gratitude

March 13, 2018

Remember when photos were taken on only special occasions and then  you had to wait for them to be developed?

These days most of us don’t have a camera, we just use our mobile phones which take photos we can then save or send to others at a click.

There is a risk we can be too busy recording scenes and events to truly appreciate them.

But as long as we’re careful not to fall into that trap, cell phone cameras make recording memories easy and today I’m grateful for that.


Word of the day

March 13, 2018

Decedent – one who is no longer living; a deceased person.


Rural round-up

March 13, 2018

NZ connection the aim – Sally Rae:

Companies are made by people – not by machinery or money.
So says Francesco Botto Poala, chief operating officer of long-standing Italian textile company Reda.

Based in Biella, in the north of Italy, Reda is 150-odd years old and exports to United States, European, Asian and Middle Eastern markets, and has supplied fabric to such huge names in the fashion industry as Giorgio Armani, Gucci, Tom Ford and Hugo Boss. . .

Italian luxury mill Reda says wool in one of its ‘best moments’ on millennial demand – Tina Morrison

(BusinessDesk) – The head of 150-year old Italian textile mill Successori Reda, who has spent the past week in the merino growing regions of the South Island with his top executives, says wool is having one of its best ever moments, driven by millennial demand for sustainable products.

“This moment for sure is a good moment for the wool growers,” said Reda chief executive Ercole Botto Poala. “Wool is a fibre that is perfect for this moment, for the future consumer. The millennial consumer doesn’t just want to buy a product or a brand, they want to buy a story and an experience that respects their environmental philosophy. Honestly, I think today is one of the best moments (for wool).” . . 

NZ AgResearch study finds wool may be better for skin than polyester:

Suspecting natural fibres are better for your skin than synthetic ones is far from woolly thinking, new New Zealand research suggests.

A new trial by scientists at Crown research institute AgResearch investigated how human skin reacted to different fabrics, and initial findings put wool over polyester.

“There’s been a lot of science looking at the connection between our health and what we put in our bodies, but here we are looking what we wear on our bodies and what that may mean for our skin health,” AgResearch scientist Dr Alex Hodgson said. . .

Falling off the sheep’s back: why Australia can’t capitalise on record wool prices – Jonathan Barrett & Colin Packham:

Sheep farmers in rural Australia waited more than half a century for wool prices to come roaring back, only to find there aren’t enough shearers to trim their golden fleeces.

“Once upon a time, you could go down to the local pub and arrange for some fellas to come in and start almost immediately – those days are gone,” said Alan Rae, a wool producer in Bungunya, a town of about 200 people in Queensland. . . 

Sisters cross Tasman to judge Australians – Sally Rae:

The Graham sisters from Hindon clearly know a thing or two about sheep.

In 2016, Sarah Graham (21) won the junior meat and wool judging championship at the Canterbury A and P Show in Christchurch, earning her a trip to Australia to judge at last year’s Royal Canberra Show.

Not to be outdone, sister Elizabeth (20) won the same competition at last year’s Canterbury A and P Show and flew to Canberra last month. . . 

Harvesting South Island-grown vegetables to order – The Vege Plot – Aimee Shaw:

Aimee Burton, 30, founder of The Vege Plot, talks harvesting vegetables to order and how an ultimatum from an employer got her started on her business journey.

What does your business do?
The Vege Plot is in its second season. I started selling spray-free vegetables and it grew from there. Now I sell a whole range of things including fresh bread to free range eggs. I don’t sell the vegetables I grow at weekly markets, I send out an email every week with what I’ve got available, people choose whatever they want and then we harvest everything to order and I deliver the veggies once a week.

The business is based in the back paddock of my parents’ farm in Glentui, an hour inland from Christchurch, and began in September 2016. We have around 50 types of different vegetables available. I also love to grow things that are a little bit unusual such as brown cucumbers, sweet Indian cucumbers, yellow cucumbers and all different-coloured heirloom tomatoes. . . 

 


Consumers pay cost of tariffs

March 13, 2018

USA President’s decision to impose tariffs on some imported goods could start trade wars.

That appears to be something of which Foreign Minister Winston Peters approves:

What’s Donald Trump’s biggest complaint? It’s that countries shouting out ‘free trade for America’ don’t practise free trade themselves. In fact it’s New Zealand First’s and my complaint that the countries we deal with apply tariffs against us whilst we’re giving them total and unfettered access to our country. It’s simply not fair.

It might not be fair but imposing tariffs on goods from other countries in retaliation is simply stupid.

It might protect inefficient local industries but local consumers will pay for that in higher prices and less choice.

 


Quote of the day

March 13, 2018

Don’t play for safety. It’s the most dangerous thing in the world. Sir Hugh Walpole who was born on this day in 1884.


March 13 in history

March 13, 2018

1138 Cardinal Gregorio Conti was elected Antipope as Victor IV.

1639  Harvard College was named for clergyman John Harvard.

1764 Earl Grey, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, was born  (d. 1845).

1781  William Herschel discovered Uranus.

1809  Gustav IV Adolf of Sweden was deposed in a coup d’état.

1845  Felix Mendelssohn‘s Violin Concerto received its première performance in Leipzig with Ferdinand David as soloist.

1862  The U.S. federal government forbade all Union army officers from returning fugitive slaves, thus effectively annulling the Fugitive Slave Law of 1850 and setting the stage for the Emancipation Proclamation.

1881 Alexander II of Russia was killed when a bomb was thrown at him.

1884 Sir Hugh Walpole, New Zealand-English novelist, was born (d. 1941).

1884 The Siege of Khartoum, Sudan began.

1897 San Diego State University was founded.

1900 –  Second Boer War: British forces occupied Bloemfontein, Orange Free State.

1900 The length of the workday for women and children is limited by law to 11 hours in France.

1920 The Kapp Putsch briefly ousted the Weimar Republic government from Berlin.

1921 Mongolia, under Baron Roman Ungern von Sternberg, declared its independence from China.

1925 Scopes Trial: A law in Tennessee banned the teaching of evolution.

1926 – Carlos Roberto Reina, Honduran lawyer and politician, President of Honduras, was born (d. 2003).

1929 – Zbigniew Messner, Polish economist and politician, 9th Prime Minister of the Republic of Poland, was born (d. 2014).

1930 The news of the discovery of Pluto was telegraphed to the Harvard College Observatory.

1933 Banks in the U.S. began to re-open after President Franklin D. Roosevelt mandated a “bank holiday“.

1935 – David Nobbs, English author and screenwriter, was born (d. 2015).

1938  – Erma Franklin, American singer, was born (d. 2002).

1939  Neil Sedaka, American singer and songwriter, was born.

1943 German forces destroyed the Jewish ghetto in Kraków.

1949 – Dame Sian Elias, New Zealand lawyer and politician, 12th Chief Justice of New Zealand, was born.

1954  – Valerie Amos, Baroness Amos, Guyanese-English politician, Secretary of State for International Development, was born.

1954  Battle of Điện Biên Phủ: Viet Minh forces attacked the French.

1956 – New Zealand won its first cricket test – playing against the West Indies at Eden Park.

NZ's first test cricket victory

1957 Cuban student revolutionaries stormed the presidential palace in Havana  in a failed attempt on the life of President Fulgencio Batista.

1960  Adam Clayton, Irish bassist (U2), was born.

1969  Apollo 9 returned safely to Earth after testing the Lunar Module.

1979 The New Jewel Movement, headed by Maurice Bishop, ousted Prime Minister Eric Gairy in a nearly bloodless coup d’etat in Grenada.

1986 Microsoft had its initial public offering.

1989 A geomagnetic storm caused the collapse of the Hydro-Québecpower grid.

1991 The United States Department of Justice announced that Exxon had agreed to pay $1 billion for the clean-up of the Exxon Valdez oil spill in Alaska.

1992 An earthquake registering 6.8 on the Richter scale killed  more than 500 in Erzincan, eastern Turkey.

1995 – The world’s first Laughter Club was launched by Dr Madan Kataria, in Mumbai.

1996 Dunblane massacre: 16 children and 1 teacher were shot dead by Thomas Watt Hamilton who then committed suicide.

1997 India’s Missionaries of Charity chose  Sister Nirmala to succeed Mother Teresa as its leader.

1997 The Phoenix lights were seen over Phoenix, Arizona by hundreds of people, and by millions on television.

2003 The journal Nature reported that 350,000-year-old footprints of an upright-walking human had been found in Italy.

2005 Terry Ratzmann shot and killed six members of the Living Church of God and the minister before killing himself.

2008 Gold prices on the New York Mercantile Exchange hit $1,000 per ounce for the first time.

2013 – Pope Francis was elected in the papal conclave to succeed Pope Benedict XVI.

2016 – An explosion in central Ankara, Turkey, killed at least 37 people and left 127 wounded.

2016 – Three gunmen attacked two hotels in the Ivory Coast town of Grand-Bassam, killing at least 18 people and injuring 33 others.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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