365 days of gratitude

March 12, 2018

It’s nearly a year since we were in Auckland en route to northern New South Wales for a farm tour when I got a text which required me to head back south instead.

As the very helpful people at Air New Zealand were sorting my new flight and arranging to retrieve my bag off the plane I was meant to be on to Australia, I remember thinking, “thank God this doesn’t mean I won’t be able to afford the groceries.”

I was away from home last week when I got a text which meant I had to re-route again. This time I could drive but it did mean unexpected expenses for accommodation.

There are a lot of people who would find that stretching for unexpected expenses would be a stretch too far for their budgets.

I am very grateful that my budget is sufficiently elastic to accommodate the unexpected.

 


Word of the day

March 12, 2018

Brachycephalic – having a relatively broad, short skull; short-headed or broad-headed with a cephalic index of over 80.


Rural round-up

March 12, 2018

Thousands of trees hide the scars of Cyclone Bola on Mangaroa Station at Tokomaru Bay – Kate Taylor:

‘It was like a bloody atomic bomb had gone off.’ An East Coast farmer looks back at Cyclone Bola. Kate Taylor continues her series marking the storm’s 30th anniversary.

Sam Reeves loves farming Mangaroa Station today but can only imagine its devastation at the hands of Cyclone Bola.

At age 27, he wasn’t born when the historic storm hit the East Coast of the North Island in 1988.

But he is the same age previous owner Graeme Williams was when Cyclone Bola dumped more than 900mm of rain on the Tokomaru Bay farm in just two days.

“When I went to bed on the night of the 7th it was pouring down with rain,” Williams says. . .

More weight for ag emissions tax – Neal Wallace:

Another unequivocal message has been delivered that agriculture needs to shoulder a greater share of the efforts and costs of reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

In January Climate Change Minister James Shaw signalled agriculture could be included in the Emissions Trading Scheme and this week the Parliamentary Commissioner for the Environment Simon Upton said climate change policy cannot ignore agricultural greenhouse gas emissions.

New Zealand has committed to cut greenhouse gas emissions to 30% below 2005 levels by 2030 but Upton said climate change policies lack bite for fear they would compromise competitiveness. . . 

Rabobank New Zealand Agribusiness Monthly March 2018:

The Agribusiness Monthly provides timely information and analysis on agricultural conditions, commodity price updates and commentary on the latest sectoral trends and developments.

Key Highlights:

Dairy
Can the price rally survive the EU Spring peak?

Beef
Is there potential for near term price falls? . . .

Industrialised meat backlash to favour NZ sheep and beef farmers – Bill Wright:

The planets seem to be aligning for sheep and beef farmers this season.

We have had that rare combination of excellent growing conditions and strong prices for both beef and lamb – prime and store.

Adding to what has been a positive start to the year was the release of a Beef + Lamb New Zealand- commissioned report on alternative proteins.

The research showed that despite the emergence of alternative proteins, the future for this country’s grass-fed red meat is healthy. Internationally, consumers are seeking red meat produced without hormones or antibiotics and to the highest standards of animal welfare – and NZ farm systems tick all of these boxes. . . 

Kansas City’s agriculture roots run deep: Cowtown turned animal health & technology centre:

At the bend in the Missouri River on grass covered flats if you listen close you might hear echoes of the past; hoofbeats, whistling, spurs jangling, the slap of leather and the high pitched zzzzzz of a lariat. Cowboys, dust covered and bone tired, riding weary cowponies barely heard over the bawling of thousands of Texas steers, “Hold’em here boys, the drives bout over.”

Kansas City sprouted from its agricultural heritage as a Cowtown. The transition to a center for animal health, education, and technology seems only natural for a town that for hundreds of years has had millions of animals pass through this gateway to the west. . .

 


Sir Eion Edgar: wealthy foreigners benefit NZ

March 12, 2018

Southern businessman and philanthropist Sir Eion Edgar told the Finance and Select committee that the law banning foreigners from buying property would be detrimental to New Zealand’s international reputation and greatly restrict overseas parties contributing to the benefit of New Zealand.

He gave four examples showing how rich overseas people have enhanced New Zealand to the tune of hundreds of millions of dollars.

1. Public access to iconic South Island high-country stations

Robert “Mutt” Lang bought five farming stations between Wanaka and Queenstown for about $60m, Edgar said. He then spent a further $50m restoring these properties to their original state.

“He has now gifted over 90 per cent of them to the Queen Elizabeth Trust for the benefit and use by all New Zealanders. In addition he continues to maintain these properties at a cost of $3m to $5m per annum – a gift to New Zealand of over $100m,” Edgar’s submission said.

• 2. Expansion and investment in Millbrook Resort near Arrowtown

Eiichi Ishii, the Japanese businessman who owns Millbrook Resort, was “continuing to pour money into it. We now have a world-class golf and accommodation facility all New Zealanders can benefit from. To date they would have spent several $100m,” Edgar said.

• 3. $40m restoration of Glenorchy camp ground

“Paul and Debbi Brainerd purchased the run-down Glenorchy camp ground. At a cost of approximately $40m, they are restoring it to an eco-friendly facility, which will cater for all types of visitors. Once completed and proven to be cash-flow positive, it will be gifted in a trust for the benefit of the residents of Glenorchy,” Edgar said.

• 4. Generous community organisation donations

“In raising money for community projects like the Winter Games, Queenstown Trails Trust and the Wakatipu Wilding Conifer Control Group, I always find the most generous supporters are overseas people who have a residence in the area,” he said. . . 

Opponents to foreign ownership see it as taking something from New Zealand.

They ignore what vendors might do with the money they get for the sales and pay no heed to what the purchasers give to us.


Quote of the day

March 12, 2018

Reality is something you rise above. –  Liza Minnelli who celebrates her 72nd birthday today.


March 12 in history

March 12, 2018

538  Witiges, king of the Ostrogoths ended his siege of Rome leaving the city in the hands of the victorious Roman general, Belisarius.

1622  Ignatius of Loyola, founder of the Jesuits, was canonized a saint by the Catholic Church.

1689 The Williamite war in Ireland began.

1821  Sir John Abbott, third Prime Minister of Canada, was born  (d. 1893).

1831 Clement Studebaker, American automobile pioneer, was born  (d. 1901).

1832 The Filippo Taglioni ballet La Sylphide received its première performance at the Paris Opéra.

1832 Charles Boycott, British land agent and source of the term to boycott, was born (d. 1897).

1864 Arthur’s Pass was “discovered”.

 Arthur's Pass 'discovered'

1868 Henry O’Farrell attempted to assassinate Prince Alfred, Duke of Edinburgh.

1869 – George Forbes, New Zealand lawyer and politician, 22nd Prime Minister of New Zealand was born (d. 1947).

1880 Henry Drysdale Dakin, British-American biochemist, known for the Dakin-West reaction, was born (d. 1952).

1881 Mustafa Kemal Atatürk, first President of Turkey was born (d. 1938).

1881 Andrew Watson made his Scotland debut as the world’s first black international football player and captain.

1894  Coca-Cola was sold in bottles for the first time.

1908 Rita Angus, New Zealand painter, was born  (d. 1970).

1910 – Masayoshi Ōhira, Japanese politician, 68th Prime Minister of Japan was born (d. 1980).

1912 The Girl Guides (later renamed the Girl Scouts of the USA) were founded in the United States.

1913  Canberra Day: The future capital of Australia was officially named Canberra.

1913  – Agathe von Trapp, Hungarian-American singer and author was born (d. 2010).

1918 Moscow became the capital of Russia again after Saint-Petersburg held this status for 215 years.

1924  – Mary Lee Woods, English mathematician and computer programmer was born (d. 2017).

1928 The St. Francis Dam in California failed, killing over 600 people.

1930 Mahatma Gandhi led a 200-mile march, known as the Dandi March, to the sea in defiance of British opposition, to protest the British monopoly on salt.

1932 Barbara Feldon, American actress and model, was born.

1933 Franklin D. Roosevelt addressed the nation for the first time as President of the United States in the first of his “fireside chats“.

1934 Konstantin Päts and General Johan Laidoner staged a coup in Estonia, and banned all political parties.

1938 Anschluss: German troops occupied Austria.

1940 Finland signed the Moscow Peace Treaty with the Soviet Union, ceding almost all of Finnish Karelia.

1946 Liza Minnelli, American singer and actress, was born.

1947 The Truman Doctrine was proclaimed to help stem the spread of Communism.

1948  James Taylor, American musician, was born.

1957 Marlon Jackson, American singer and musician (The Jackson 5), was born.

1966 Suharto became President of Indonesia.

1968  Mauritius achieved independence.

1971 The March 12 Memorandum, was sent to the Demirel government of Turkey and the government resigned.

1975 – New Zealand Red Cross worker Malcolm ‘Mac’ Riding  was killed in a plane crash in Vietnam.

New Zealand Red Cross worker killed in Vietnam

1992 – Mauritius becomes a republic while remaining a member of the Commonwealth of Nations.

1993 Several bombs exploded in Mumbai killing about 300 and injuring hundreds more.

1993 North Korea said it planned to withdraw from the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty and refused to allow inspectors access to its nuclear sites.

1993 – The Blizzard of 1993 – Snow began to fall across the eastern portion of the US with tornadoes, thunder snow storms, high winds and record low temperatures.

1994 The Church of England ordained its first female priests.

2003 –  Zoran Đinđić, Prime Minister of Serbia, was assassinated in Belgrade.

2004 – A President of South Korea, Roh Moo-hyun, was impeached by its national assembly for the first time in the nation’s history.

2005 – Tung Chee Hwa, the first Chief Executive of Hong Kong, stepped down from his post after his resignation was approved by the Chinese central government.

2009 – Financier Bernard Madoff admitted to scamming $18 billion, the largest in Wall Street history.

2011 – A reactor at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant melted and exploded and released radioactivity into the atmosphere a day after Japan’s earthquake.

2014 – An explosion in the New York City neighbourhood of East Harlem killed 8 and injured 70 others.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


%d bloggers like this: