365 days of gratitude

February 10, 2018

For all sorts of reasons, all sorts of people make my life happy and I’m grateful for them all.

Sometimes, I forget to thank the people who make my life happy in som many ways. Sometimes, I forget to tell them how much I really do appreciate them for being an important part of my life. So thank you, all of you,  just for being here for me.


Word of the day

February 10, 2018

Nickum –  a mischievous  or troublesome person; mischief-maker; scallywag; cheating or dishonest person.


Saturday’s smiles

February 10, 2018

A husband, proving to his wife that women talk more than men, showed her a study which indicated that men use, on the average, only 15,000 words a day, whereas women use 30,000 words a day.

She thought about this for a while and then told her husband that women use twice as many words as men because they have to repeat everything they say.

He looked stunned and said, “What?”


Rural round-up

February 10, 2018

Claims costs soar – Annette Scott:

Farmers have so far lodged 44 Mycoplasma bovis compensation claims with the Ministry for Primary Industries.

While MPI would not give the total value of the claims farmer Aad van Leeuwen said his claim so far was for $4.5 million and that was likely to be tripled.

And despite the law saying compensation for losses made as a result of MPI exercising its powers should leave farmers no worse off, the ministry was likely to make offers to farmers even when they could document actual loss figures.

There is also little likelihood of payments being made quickly. . .

Labour’s 100 days fails farmers:

Labour’s first 100 days in Government has earnt it a dismal report card as far as farmers are concerned, National’s Primary Industries spokesperson Nathan Guy says.

“The Labour-led coalition has been in government for over 100 days now, yet all they have to show for it is the announcement of a series of expensive reviews and rebrands all the while staying silent on the big issues facing the sector right now.

“The minister Damien O’Connor is raiding $17 million out of the Primary Growth Partnership fund to rebrand MPI, at the expense of vitally important research and development funding – which is now being put on hold. . .

Animal genetics ‘Olympics’ a first for NZ:

About 1000 people will this month travel to New Zealand for three prestigious animal recording and genetics conferences.
For the first time, the World Congress on Genetics Applied to Livestock Production (WCGALP) will hold its four-yearly conference in NZ.

The congress will be combined with the annual conferences for the International Committee for Animal Recording (ICAR) and Interbull – the leading event for research and development in animal improvement, milk testing, DNA parentage analysis, genomics and genetics. . . 

Labour of love for the environment:

Protecting and nurturing the environment for our future generations is a key commitment in the refreshed strategy, Dairy Tomorrow. Many farmers already have their sleeves rolled up doing inspirational environmental work throughout New Zealand. They include third generation dairy farmer Andy Palmer.

It was a chance remark he made back in the late ‘90s that got Andy started on what has become a labour of love spanning two decades. And it’s a passion that’s resulted in an extraordinary legacy of lush riparian planting of native species on his farm near Temuka, which he owns with wife Sharon Collett. . .

Data from new smart sensors can help growers drive yields and cut costs:

Cutting-edge wireless sensor technology now available to UK growers that measures precise humidity, moisture and temperature points, is set to equip farmers with the data they need to help drive improvements throughout their businesses.

Agriculture is becoming increasingly data-driven, and sensing technology is becoming instrumental to the way farmers grow crops.

Access to precise, detailed data is helping farmers to make better, more informed decisions: tailoring cultivation, avoiding produce and crop damage, and reducing costs. . .

Rights granted for peach variety – Sally Brooker:

A new variety of peach has been bred by North Otago orchardists Helen Brookes and Terry Fowler.

The couple achieved the feat at their smallholding at Georgetown, just east of Duntroon, in the Waitaki Valley. They have been granted plant variety rights from the Intellectual Property Office for their ”Sweet Perfection” peach.

The orchard was more of a horticultural interest than a commercial venture, Dr Brookes said.

”We used to and still get a number of visits from organisations to see what we do here. . .


Looks don’t matter

February 10, 2018

The name Megan Whelan will be familiar to anyone who listens to RNZ.

Her voice will be too.

Until I read this  I had no idea what she looked like and that didn’t matter.

I don’t remember the first time I realised I’m fat.

It might have been at 13, when someone left a pamphlet for a weightloss programme in my mailbox at boarding school. I can remember picking it up, excited that it might be a letter from my parents, only to feel hot shame, tears threatening to overflow, as I tried to hide the humiliating glossy pages from the girls around me.

It could have been at twenty, when an indoor netball opponent expressed surprise at my skill – because fat people can’t be athletic – and then anger when he realised I was running literal rings around him.

It could have been any number of small, slight, humiliations. The first time I realised that nothing in a clothes store would fit me, even with all the uncomfortable shapewear in the world. The first time someone yelled abuse from a car, calling me a fat bitch. The first time I ordered a salad, because I was too embarrassed to eat a burger in public. . .

How Megan looks still doesn’t matter.

Looks don’t matter on the radio and they shouldn’t matter in life.

Someone’s size, how they dress, the colour of their skin or hair . . .  those are all their business.

What matters isn’t how people look but how they are.

Megan’s story is also at RNZ from butt of the joke to kicking bullies’ butts.

She read an excerpt from it  on The Project.

 


Saturday soapbox

February 10, 2018

Saturday’s soapbox is yours to use as you will – within the bounds of decency and absence of defamation. You’re welcome to look back or forward, discuss issues of the moment, to pontificate, ponder or point us to something of interest, to educate, elucidate or entertain, amuse, bemuse or simply muse, but not abuse.

Image may contain: 1 person, text

Stupid is knowing the truth, seeing the truth but still believing the lies.


February 10 in history

February 10, 2018

1258 – Baghdad fell to the Mongols, and the Abbasid Caliphate was destroyed.

1306 Robert the Bruce murdered John Comyn, his leading political rival sparking revolution in the Scottish Wars of Independence.

1355 The St. Scholastica’s Day riot broke out in Oxford leaving 63 scholars and perhaps 30 locals dead in two days.

1567 An explosion destroyed the Kirk o’ Field house in Edinburgh. The second husband of Mary Queen of Scots, Lord Darnley was found strangled, in what many believe to be an assassination.

1763 The 1763 Treaty of Paris ended theFrench and Indian War and France ceded Quebec to Great Britain.

1775 Charles Lamb, English essayist, was born  (d. 1834).

1798 Louis Alexandre Berthier invaded Rome.

1814 Battle of Champaubert

1840 Queen Victoria married Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha.

1846 First Anglo-Sikh WarBattle of Sobraon – British defeated Sikhs in final battle of the war.

1870 The YWCA was founded.

1893 Jimmy Durante, American actor/comedian, was born  (d. 1980).

1894  Harold Macmillan, British Prime Minister, was born  (d. 1986).

1906 HMS Dreadnought (1906) was launched.

1913 – News of the failure of Captain Robert Falcon Scott’s expedition to the South Pole was telegraphed secretly from Oamaru.

1920 – Jozef Haller de Hallenburg performed a symbolic wedding of Poland to the sea, celebrating restitution of Polish access to open sea.

1923 Texas Tech University was founded as Texas Technological College in Lubbock.

1930  Robert Wagner, American actor, was born.

1931 New Delhi became the capital of India.

1933 The New York City-based Postal Telegraph Company introduces the first singing telegram.

1934 Fleur Adcock, New Zealand poet, was born.

1937 Roberta Flack, American singer, was born.

1947 Italy ceded most of Venezia Giulia to Yugoslavia.

1950 Mark Spitz, American swimmer, was born.

1952 Lee Hsien Loong, Prime Minister of Singapore, was born.

1955  – Greg Norman, Australian golfer, was born.

1962 Captured American spy pilot Gary Powers was exchanged for captured Soviet spy Rudolf Abel.

1964 – The aircraft carrier HMAS Melbourne (R21) collided with the destroyer HMAS Voyager (D04) off the south coast of New South Wales.

1967 The provision of free milk in schools ended.

End of free school milk

1967 – The 25th Amendment to the United States Constitution was ratified.

1981 – A fire at the Las Vegas Hilton hotel-casino killed eight and injured 198.

1982  Iafeta Paleaaesina, New Zealand rugby league player, was born.

1989 Ron Brown became the first African American to lead a major American political party when he was elected chairman of the Democratic National Committee.

1996 The IBM supercomputer Deep Blue defeated Garry Kasparov for the first time.

2008 The 2008 Namdaemun fire severely damaged Namdaemun, the firstNational Treasure of South Korea.

2009 – The communication satellites Iridium 33 and Kosmos-2251collided in orbit, destroying both.

2013 – Thirty six people were killed and 39 injured in a stampede in Allahabad, India, during the Kumbh Mela festival.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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