365 days of gratitude

January 9, 2018

I’m old enough to have listened to the radio long before I saw television.

I’m also old enough to remember cars which didn’t have radios.

That meant people conversed and sang together more than we do now.

But I drive by myself a lot and on long, slow journeys alone save for a dog, as mine home from Wanaka was today, I enjoy listening to the radio.

Today I had the entertainment of Matinee Idle on RadioNZ.

Phil O’Brien and Simon Morris’s music and musing make me laugh and today provided the bonus of an interview with John Clarke’s daughter Lauren and I’m grateful for that.

 


Word of the day

January 9, 2018

Lumming – heavy rain; raining heavily.


Rural round-up

January 9, 2018

Stock killed apparently for ‘target practice’ – John Lewis:

Five farmers are livid after nine sheep, two cattle beasts, a cow and a bull were shot on their properties for what appears to be nothing more than “target practice”.

Taieri farmer James Adam said he went to check his stock in Otokia-Kuri Bush Rd yesterday morning and found two of his beef cows shot dead.

Another farmer’s cow was shot and killed on a nearby property in Akatore Rd, south of Taieri Mouth.The night before, a third farmer found five of his sheep shot dead nearby on Takitakitoa Rd. . .

Lake Opuha works around the clock to keep up with irrigation demand – Pat Deavoll:

South Canterbury’s Lake Opuha is getting a workout this summer with an “almost unprecedented” swing in December weather ramping up irrigation demand.

Opuha Water Limited executive officer Tony McCormick said the shift from extremely wet to extremely dry had resulted in a rapid increase in irrigation from “virtually zero” in early November to nearly 100 per cent four weeks later.

“The sudden dry conditions affected lake storage and required special efforts from our ops team to get the scheme up to full capacity in a short time,” he said. . .

Norsewood fabulous place to farm and garden, says land owner Lyn McConchie – Christine McKay:

It’s quite possible Norsewood is one of the best places in the Tararua to be a farmer or a gardener, local weather watcher Lyn McConchie says.

“The average annual rainfall on my farm in upper Norsewood for the past six years (2012 to 2017) has been 1293mm. In that period the lowest rainfall was 1207mm in 2015 and the highest has been 1428 in 2017,” Ms McConchie said.

“Despite other areas around – such as the Takapau Plains – having poor rainfall, we have not.” . . 

 

Oxford Farming Conference Union Debate 2018  “This House believes that by 2100 eating meat will be a thing of the past” – Seconding AGAINST the motion – Emily Retledge:

Mister President, thank you for the opportunity to speak to the House on this motion.

Ladies and Gentlemen, as informed and conscientious members of the agricultural industry, I do not doubt for a second that you will vote wisely and reject this motion. The slippery rhetoric of the liberal elite will not wash with you. We have no sympathy for the Proponents or the extremist behaviour they inspire. Their cause is lost here today.

However, I would like to take this opportunity to challenge your thinking on WHY we must reject this motion and also I would like to be so bold as to give you some inspiration as to HOW we can continue to “meat” the expectations of society for years to come. . . 

In Nigeria farming needs and rewards creative agripreneurs – Chibuike Emmanuel:

I never expected to become a catfish farmer, though I’m not all surprised that I wound up in agriculture. I’ve always been around farms—so it was natural that I’d make it my life’s work here in Nigeria.

Unfortunately, many of Africa’s young people don’t recognize the same opportunity. Many don’t know how to get started. Lots think that it’s old fashioned. Others worry about the challenges of finance and infrastructure.

Yet we all see the need: Farmers are the key to Africa’s economic emancipation. We have an enormous amount of arable land, a large youth population, and a lot of catching up to do—untapped potential to feed a hungry world, if we’re willing to work hard and take up new technologies. . .


Jim Anderton 21.1.38 – 7.1.18

January 9, 2018

A junior reporter wouldn’t normally interview a senior political figure.

But when Jim Anderton came into the newsroom in the run-up to the 1981 election I was the only one there.

He was president of the Labour Party. I don’t remember what he said but I do remember that he was immaculately dressed and a relaxed interviewee.

I disagreed with many of his policies – so strongly was I opposed to Kiwibank, I didn’t go into a Post Office for at least two years after it was established.

But I admired his standing up and working for what he believed in.

And as another member of that club no-one chooses to join – bereaved parents – I had great sympathy for him after the death of his daughter. It is difficult enough dealing with bereavement privately, it must be so much harder when you’re a public figure.


Quote of the day

January 9, 2018

Don’t sit back and wait for God to do it all. Ask for His advice, but be prepared to do the hard yards yourself. – Morris Gleitzman who celebrates his 65th birthday today.


January 9 in history

January 9, 2018

475 – Byzantine Emperor Zeno wasforced to flee his capital at Constantinople, and his general, Basiliscus gained control of the empire.

681 – Twelfth Council of Toledo: King Erwig of the Visigoths initiated a council in which he implements diverse measures against the Jews in Spain.

1127  – Invading Jurchen soldiers from the Jin Dynasty besieged and sacked Bianjing (Kaifeng), the capital of the Song Dynasty of China, and abduct Emperor Qinzong and others, ending the Northern Song Dynasty.

1150 – Prince Hailing of Jin and other court officials murdered Emperor Xizong of Jin. Hailing succeeds him as emperor.

1349 The Jewish population of Basel, Switzerland, believed by the residents to be the cause of the ongoing Black Death, was rounded up and incinerated.

1431 Judges’ investigations for the trial of Joan of Arc began in Rouen, France, the seat of the English occupation government.

1768  Philip Astley staged the first modern circus in London.

1773 – Cassandra Austen, English watercolourist and sister of Jane Austen, was born (d. 1845).

1793  Jean-Pierre Blanchard became the first person to fly in a balloon in the United States.

1799 British Prime Minister William Pitt introduced income tax to raise funds for the war against Napoleon.

1806 – Admiral Horatio Lord Nelson received a state funeral and was interred in St Paul’s Cathedral.

1816 Sir Humphry Davy tested the Davy lamp for miners at Hebburn Colliery.

1822  Portuguese prince Pedro I of Brazil decided to stay in Brazil against the orders of the Portuguese king João VI, starting the Brazilian independence process.

1839 The French Academy of Sciences announced the Daguerreotypephotography process.

1854 Jennie Jerome, American society beauty and mother of Winston Churchill, was born (d. 1921).

1859 Carrie Chapman Catt, American suffragist leader, was born  (d. 1947).

1861  The “Star of the West” incident near Charleston, South Carolina – considered by some historians to be the “First Shots of the American Civil War”.

1878  Umberto I became King of Italy.

1880 – The Great Gale of 1880 devastated parts of Oregon and Washington with high wind and heavy snow.

1894 New England Telephone and Telegraph installed the first battery-operated telephone switchboard in Lexington, Massachusetts.

1896 Warwick Braithwaite, New Zealand-born British conductor, was born (d. 1971).

1898  Gracie Fields, English music hall performer, was born  (d. 1979).

1902 Saint Josemaría Escrivá, Spanish Catholic priest and founder of Opus Dei, was born (d. 1975) .

1903  Hallam Tennyson, 2nd Baron Tennyson, son of the poet Alfred Tennyson, became the second Governor-General of Australia.

1905 According to the Julian Calendar which was used at the time, Russian workers staged a march on the Winter Palace that ended in the massacre by Tsarist troops known as Bloody Sunday, setting off the Russian Revolution of 1905.

1908  Simone de Beauvoir, French author, was born (d. 1986).

1911 – Gypsy Rose Lee, American burlesque entertainer, dancer, actress, and author (d. 1970)

1913  Richard Nixon, 37th President of the United States, was born  (d. 1994).

1916  The Battle of Gallipoli concluded with an Ottoman Empire victory when the last Allied forces were evacuated from the peninsula.

1916 Peter Twinn, English World War II code-breaker, was born (d. 2004) .

1918 Battle of Bear Valley: The last battle of the American Indian Wars.

1920 Clive Dunn, British actor, was born (d. 2012).

1923 Katherine Mansfield died.
Death of Katherine Mansfield

1928  Judith Krantz, American author, was born.

1933 Wilbur Smith, Zambian-British novelist, was born.

1939 Susannah York, British actress, was born.

1941 Joan Baez, American singer and activist, was born.

1942 Lee Kun-hee, Korean industrialist, chairman of Samsung, was born.

1944 –  Jimmy Page, British musician and producer (Led Zeppelin), was born.

1948 – Bill Cowsill, American singer (The Cowsills), was born (d. 2006).

1951 –  Crystal Gayle, American singer, was born.

1951 – The United Nations headquarters officially opened in New York City.

1953 –  Morris Gleitzman, British-Australian children’s author, was born.

1978 – AJ McLean, American singer (Backstreet Boys), was born.

1980 – Sergio Garcia, Spanish golfer, was born.

2005  Rawhi Fattouh succeeded  Yasser Arafat as head of the Palestine Liberation Organization .

2007  – Apple CEO Steve Jobs unveiled the first iPhone.

2011 – Iran Air Flight 277 crashed near Orumiyeh in the northeast of the country, killing 77 people.

2013 – A SeaStreak ferry travelling to lower Manhattan, New York City, crashed into the dock, injuring 85 people.

2014  – An explosion at a Mitsubishi Materials chemical plant inYokkaichiJapan, kills at least five people and injures 17 others.

2015 – The perpetrators of the Charlie Hebdo shooting in Paris two days earlier were both killed after a hostage situation. Elsewhere, a second hostage situation, related to the Charlie Hebdo shooting, occurred at a Jewish market,Hypercacher, in the eastern Paris suburb of Vincennes.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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