Word of the day

November 5, 2017

Vargle – to work in a messy or untidy way; perform an unpleasant task.


# 11

November 5, 2017

#11 Notecard

# 11 © 2016 Brian Andreas – posted with permission.

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Rural round-up

November 5, 2017

Rebuilding dairy farmers’ social licence to operate with the public – Pat Deavoll:

A couple of weeks ago I went along to the Forest Growers Research Conference. I was bamboozled by science except for one presentation by the director of Our Land and Water National Science Challenge Ken Taylor who works for AgResearch. He was a good speaker, and his topic piqued my interest.

Taylor praised the farming leaders, headed by Federated Farmers president Katie Milne, who fronted up and said: “water quality is our problem, we’ll own it and fix it.” Taylor told us that they were seizing the initiative and stepping towards rebuilding farming’s social licence to operate (SLO).

I’d never heard of this term before, but have since discovered that everybody else has. . . 

Tararua nurse first in country to get certificate in rural nursing – Georgia Forrester:

A Tararua woman is the first in the country to walk away with a new rural qualification in nursing.

Rowena Panchaud said her passion for her rural area led to her completing a graduate certificate in nursing practice, with a rural nursing speciality.

The Otago-born woman has lived in Dannevirke with her family since 2006. . .

LIC bulls given all clear from M.bovis:

LIC has confirmed its artificial breeding bulls are free from the Mycoplasma bovis cattle disease.

LIC is a farmer-owned co-operative and the largest artificial breeding company in New Zealand. More than three out of four cows grazing on New Zealand dairy farms are sired by an LIC bull.

Although confident the disease was not present in its bulls, the co-op announced in September it would test for the disease to provide its farmers with greater peace of mind through the dairy mating season. . . 

 – Keith Woodford:

Those of us involved with research relating to A1 and A2 beta-casein know all too well the challenges of publishing and disseminating that research.  Given the extent to which beta-casein research challenges established positions, some of which are held by powerful entities, there are lots of speed bumps.

Events of recent weeks have once again illustrated some of those challenges. I lay out one such example below.     

Together with Boyd Swinburn, who is Professor of Population Nutrition and Global Health at Auckland University, I was attempting to disseminate to a wider audience the results of a science review paper that we and other colleagues co-authored. The scientific paper itselfwas published earlier this year in the journal Nutrition and Diabetes which is part of the Nature Publishing stable of scientific journals. . . 

Dairy stays above churn of plant-based substitutes – Charlie Dreaver:

Spending on dairy-free alternatives is on the rise as more consumers turn to plant-based milks, yoghurts and cheeses.

The country’s two supermarket chains Progressive and Foodstuffs have taken notice and are stocking more of the products than ever, but the dairy industry said it was not worried.

Foodstuffs, which operates the New World and Pak ‘n Save chains, reported that sales of plant-based milks – such as nut, oat, soy and rice milks – in its North Island stores had shot up 11 percent since August last year.

Progressive Enterprises, which own Countdown’s stores, now has more than 60 non-dairy milk, cheese, and yoghurt products on the shelves. . .

Golden rice approval needed to produce a life changing staple food – V. Ravichandran:

 Their eyes tell their sad stories as ghostly white irises give way to vacant stares. We can look at them but they can’t look back at us. They’ve gone blind because of malnutrition.

I see these poor people all over India, where I live, but their suffering knows no borders: The problem of vitamin-A deficiency curses dozens of countries in the developing world. It causes visual impairment in millions of people. As many as half a million children go blind each year. Hundreds of thousands die within months of losing their eyesight.

What a heart-rending tragedy.

The good news is that science teaches us how to prevent this crisis. The bad news is that manmade complications keep getting in the way. . .


Sunday soapbox

November 5, 2017

Sunday’s soapbox is yours to use as you will – within the bounds of decency and absence of defamation. You’re welcome to look back or forward, discuss issues of the moment, to pontificate, ponder or point us to something of interest, to educate, elucidate or entertain, amuse, bemuse or simply muse, but not abuse.

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In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock. –  Thomas Jefferson.


November 5 in history

November 5, 2017

1338  Ly Anh Tong was enthroned as emperor of Vietnam at the age of two, starting a 37-year reign.

1499   Publication of theCatholicon, the first Breton dictionary as well as the first French dictionary.

1530   The St. Felix’s Flood destroyed the city of Reimerswaal in the Netherlands.

1605   Gunpowder Plot: A conspiracy led by Robert Catesby to blow up the English Houses of Parliament was thwarted when Sir Thomas Knyvet, a justice of the peace, found Guy Fawkes in a cellar below the House of Lords.

1688  Glorious Revolution began: William of Orange landed at Brixham.

1743  Coordinated scientific observations of the transit of Mercury were organized by Joseph-Nicolas Delisle.

1757  Seven Years’ War: Frederick the Great defeated the allied armies of France and the Holy Roman Empire at the Battle of Rossbach.

1768   Treaty of Fort Stanwix, to adjust the boundary line between Indian lands and white settlements set forth in the Proclamation of 1763 in the Thirteen Colonies.

1780   French-American forces under Colonel LaBalme were defeated by Miami Chief Little Turtle.

1831  Nat Turner, American slave leader, was tried, convicted, and sentenced to death.

1838   The Federal Republic of Central America began to disintegrate when Nicaragua separated from the federation.

1850  Ella Wheeler Wilcox, American author and poet, was born (d. 1919).

1854   Crimean War: The Battle of Inkerman.

1862 Indian Wars: In Minnesota, 303 Dakota warriors were found guilty of rape and murder of whites and were sentenced to hang.

1872   In defiance of the law, suffragist Susan B. Anthony voted for the first time, and is later fined $100.

1881 – Attack on pacifist settlement at Parihaka.

Attack on pacifist settlement at Parihaka

1895   George B. Selden was granted the first U.S. patent for an automobile.

1911  – Italy annexed Tripoli and Cyrenaica.

1911 Roy Rogers, American actor, was born (d. 1998).

1913 – Battle of Featherston Street – crowds of strike supporters clashed with more than 800 mounted special constables – ‘Massey’s Cossacks’.

Battle of Featherston Street

1913   King Otto of Bavaria was deposed by his cousin, Prince Regent Ludwig, who assumed the title Ludwig III.

1913  Vivien Leigh, English actress, was born (d. 1967).

1916   The Kingdom of Poland was proclaimed by the Act of November 5th.

1916  The Everett Massacre in Everett, Washington as political differences led to a shoot-out between the Industrial Workers of the World organisers and local police.

1917   October Revolution: In Tallinn, Estonia, Communist leader Jaan Anvelt led revolutionaries in overthrowing the Provisional Government (As Estonia and Russia were still using the Julian Calendar, subsequent period references show an October 23 date).

1917  St. Tikhon of Moscow was elected the Patriarch of Moscow and of the Russian Orthodox Church.

1921  Princess Fawzia of Egypt, Queen of Iran, was born.

1931   Ike Turner, American musician, was born (d. 2007).

1937   Adolf Hitler held a secret meeting and stated his plans for acquiring “living space” for the German people.

1940   Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected to a third term as President of the United States.

1941  Art Garfunkel, American musician, was born.

1942   The Second Battle of El Alamein was won by the British Allies.

1963  Tatum O’Neal, American actress, was born.

1967   The Hither Green rail crash killed 49 people. The survivors included Robin Gibb of the Bee Gees.

1968   United States presidential election, 1968: Republican Richard Nixon won the American presidency.

1983   Byford Dolphin diving bell accident killed five and leaves one severely injured.

1986   USS RentzUSS Reeves and USS Oldendorf visited Qingdao (Tsing Tao) China — the first US Naval visit to China since 1949.

1987   Govan Mbeki was released from custody after serving 24 years of a life sentence for terrorism and treason.

1990   Rabbi Meir Kahane, founder of the far-right Kach movement, was shot dead after a speech in New York.

1995   André Dallaire attempted to assassinate Prime Minister Jean Chrétien of Canada. He is thwarted when the Prime Minister’s wife locked the door.

1996   President of Pakistan Farooq Ahmed Khan Leghari dismissed the government of Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto and dissolved the National Assembly of Pakistan.

2006   Saddam Hussein, former president of Iraq, and his co-defendants Barzan Ibrahim al-Tikriti and Awad Hamed al-Bandar were sentenced to death in the al-Dujail trial for the role in the massacre of the 148 Shi’as in 1982.

2007   China’s first lunar satellite, Chang’e 1 went into orbit around the Moon.

2009   US Army Major Nidal Malik Hasan allegedly killed 13 and wounded 30 at Fort Hood, Texas in the largest mass shooting ever at a US military installation.

2011 – Bank Transfer Day and a hatred of for-profit banks following a bank-caused economic collapse prompted more than 2.2 million Americans to switch to a not-for-profit credit union in order to punish bankers.

2013 – India launched the Mars Orbiter Mission, its first interplanetary probe.

2015 – An iron ore tailings dam burst in the Brazilian state of Minas Gerais flooding a valley, causing mudslides in the nearby village of Bento Rodrigues and causing up to 9 deaths and 19 missing.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia.


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