Word of the day

November 4, 2017

Tewly – weak; sickly; tender.


Saturday’s smiles

November 4, 2017

A blonde, a brunette, and a redhead snuck into a farm.

The farmer said to his wife, “I think I hear something outside.”

The girls heard the door open and they all ran in different directions.

The brunette ran into the cow pen, the redhead ran into the stable  and the blonde ran into the potato paddock.

The farmer went to the cow pen and said,”Is there anyone there?” The brunette said,”Mmmmmmmoooooo.”

Reassured, he went over to the stable and said, “Is there anyone there?” and the redhead said, “Neigh, neigh.”

Then he went over to the potato paddock and said, “Is there anyone there?” and the blonde said, “Potatooooo.”


Rural round-up

November 4, 2017

Beef + Lamb pulls plug on the Glammies – Nicole Sharp:

For 10 years, farmers from throughout the country have entered their best of best in the Golden Lamb Awards, better known as the Glammies.

This year, looking to reinvest farmer levies in more crucial areas, Beef + Lamb New Zealand has pulled its funding from the event. Nicole Sharp reports.

After 10 years of celebrating farmers’ best-raised lamb, the Glammies are no more.

Since the event’s inception, Beef + Lamb New Zealand Ltd (BLNZ) has partnered with Beef + Lamb New Zealand Inc to run the event, with BLNZ the predominant funder.

In the past six months, BLNZ has been consulting its farmers and reviewing its strategy and anticipated revenue stream through to 2022. . . 

Wool prices lift but long way to go – Simon Hartley:

The worst appears to be over for wool prices but prices are still very low and the industry is ”still not out of the woods yet”, ASB senior rural economist Nathan Penny says.

Prices for 39 micron wool, for example, had lifted 25% from the record low level set in July this year, he said. Despite the lift, 39 micron prices remained 28% below the 10-year average level, Mr Penny said in the latest ”Farmshed Economics” report.

Meanwhile, mid micron prices had been stable over recent months. Prices bottomed out earlier than coarse types towards the start of the year. . . 

 NZ King Salmon shares hit record on guidance uplift, sales growth -Tina Morrison:

New Zealand King Salmon Investments shares rose to a record after the fish farmer raised its 2018 earnings guidance, saying it expects to lift volumes while maintaining prices and improving production.

The stock climbed 3.5 percent to $2.35 and has soared 78 percent this year. They were sold in the initial public offering in September 2016 at $1.12 apiece. . . 

 – Keith Woodford:

[The article below was intended to be published some weeks back at The Conversation. The Conversation is the online portal, funded by Universities in Australia, New Zealand and the UK, where academics are encouraged to communicate and converse with non-academics. However, this particular article was blocked at the last minute by the Senior Editor(s) at The Conversation, having previously been approved within their editorial system. The Senior Editor(s) felt that the interests of associated commercial parties, who might benefit from dissemination of the article, were too great. A fuller story of that publishing saga will be posted shortly.
The content, formatting and supporting links are shown as originally agreed with The Conversation and reflect the prior input of one of their editors. This article can be freely republished, with or withut this foreword, but retaining the title as posted here, and with acknowledgements as to source [https://keithwoodford.wordpress.com].

Authors: Keith Woodford & Boyd Swinburn
Disclosures: See end of article

Type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune disease in which the body attacks its own insulin-producing cells, is on the rise globally.
Early evidence of an association between type 1 diabetes and a protein in cow milk, known as A1 beta-casein, was published in 2003. However, the notion that the statistically strong association could be causal has remained controversial.
As part of a seven-person team, we have reviewed the overall evidence that links A1 beta-casein to type 1 diabetes. Our research brings forward new ways of looking at that evidence. . . 

Sheep dairy better match for clean green image:

New Lincoln research points to sheep dairy better fulfilling the green credentials New Zealand uses to differentiate its produce in the global market than its cow counterparts.

Senior Lecturer in Agribusiness Management Dr Nic Lees co-authored the paper “Competitive advantage through responsible innovation in the New Zealand sheep dairy industry.”

It finds, rather than competing on cost the sheep dairy industry should promote sustainability and environmental benefits, and be innovative…

Website covers new ground for fertiliser spreaders:

A new website has been launched by the New Zealand Groundspread Fertilisers Association (NZGFA). The site – www.nzgfa.co.nz – promotes best practice fertiliser spreading. It was recently unveiled alongside a new logo at the NZGFA 61st annual conference.

The new site provides industry news and advice for groundspreaders as well as information for farmers, growers and other fertiliser users on how to find a local groundspreader accredited to Spreadmark, the industry’s standard. There is also career advice for prospective groundspreaders, and a video that explains training as well as potential salary. . . 

Allied Farmers unsure about the year ahead with weak first-quarter livestock sales – Sophie Boot:

(BusinessDesk) – Allied Farmers’ first-quarter livestock earnings fell, although the rural services firm says it’s too early to say whether it will recover by the end of the current half or the financial year.

Earnings in the three months ended Sept. 30 were below the same period a year earlier “largely due to the impact of the wetter spring weather, which has generally had the impact of reducing livestock sales in this quarter,” the Hawera-based company said in a statement. Allied Farmers had previously predicted “careful growth” in the livestock business, tempered with a flat outlook for the meat processing business as overseas prices remain low. . . 

Harry is a prince among bull calves:

Harry the Hereford-cross, a hungry four-month old bull calf weighing 214kg has beaten his rival hands down in a competition between two DairyNZ research and development farms to raise the heaviest IHC calf.

Harry looked good from the start, arriving early in the season and weighing 50kg at birth. He had the right bloodline to wear the crown. His Dad was a pure bred Hereford and his Mum was a Friesian so he was already set on a winning course, according to Scott Farm Manager Ben Fisher. . . 

“When you cross a beef bull with a Friesian or dairy cow you get what’s known as hybrid vigour,” Ben says. “He’s got very good genes.”


Will Icebreaker VF deal get OIO tick?

November 4, 2017

Icebreaker, one of the company’s that made merino fashionable, is selling to a USA company  but the deal needs OIO approval:

US-based VF Corporation needs Overseas investment office approval to buy Kiwi merino clothing maker Icebreaker, meaning the deal is worth at least $100 million. The terms of the deal were not disclosed.

Merino producers have been getting a lot of pressure to sign up to 10-year contracts with Icebreaker. The proposed sale explains that and a good number of committed producers would have made the deal more attractive to the buyer.

VF Corporation has a market capitalization of around US$28 billion and its portfolio includes The North Face, Timberland, SmartWool, Vans, Wrangler and Lee. In its third-quarter result, the company forecast its 2017 revenue would be approximately US$12.1 billion.

Icebreaker had annual sales of $220 million, of which 86 percent were in offshore markets. Its own outlets and e-commerce sales make up 32 percent of sales, according to the company’s latest statement.

While the terms of the deal were not disclosed, Icebreaker confirmed the need for OIO approval due to the size of the transaction, implying a minimum value of at least $100 million. In a separate statement, VF said “the purchase price is not material to VF.” It also clarified that it expects the transaction to close in April 2018. . . 

I would think the deal would be worth considerably more than $100 million. Regardless of how much more, closure by next April is probably very optimistic.

Friends who have had dealings with the OIO, as sellers and buyers, said it was a very time-consuming process.

Unless it gets a straight decline from the outset, it won’t be any faster under the new government.

According to Icebreaker, the deal creates an expanded opportunity for the New Zealand merino industry. “This is a once in a lifetime opportunity for our global Icebreaker team and for our New Zealand wool suppliers to introduce a whole new universe of consumers to the benefits of sustainably farmed, ethically sourced, New Zealand Merino wool,” said Icebreaker founder Jeremy Moon.

John Brakenridge, CEO of the NZ Merino Company, noted VF have also had a long-term commitment to the New Zealand Merino industry through their investment in SmartWool and NZ Merino has worked with SmartWool in areas such as sustainability and social responsibility.

“Today we are seeing record demand and prices for New Zealand merino wool …the synergy of these two brands working as sisters from the same stable to build increased awareness of the Merino apparel category represents an exciting new development for the New Zealand merino wool industry,” he said. . . 

People tend to be less opposed to selling land to foreigners than selling companies.

But no matter who owns it the land and the business carried out on it stay here.

When a company is sold, there is no guarantee anything will stay in New Zealand.

Icebreaker is a New Zealand company and its clothing is designed here using locally grown merino wool but manufacturing has been done overseas for several years.

If the sale does go ahead, people who want New Zealand made merino will still have the choice of buying from companies like Glowing Sky and Mons Royale.

 


Saturday soapbox

November 4, 2017

Saturday’s soapbox is yours to use as you will – within the bounds of decency and absence of defamation. You’re welcome to look back or forward, discuss issues of the moment, to pontificate, ponder or point us to something of interest, to educate, elucidate or entertain, amuse, bemuse or simply muse, but not abuse.

Image may contain: one or more people, people standing and text

Tact is the knack of making a point without making an enemy –  Sir Issac Newton.


November 4 in history

November 4, 2017

1333  The River Arno flooding caused massive damage in Florence.

1429   Joan of Arc liberated Saint-Pierre-le-Moûtier.

1576   Eighty Years’ War:  Spain captured Antwerp.

1677  The future Mary II of England married William, Prince of Orange.

1737   The Teatro di San Carlo was inaugurated.

1783   W.A. Mozart’s Symphony No. 36 was performed for the first time.

1791  The Western Confederacy of American Indians won a major victory over the United States in the Battle of the Wabash.

1825  The Erie Canal was completed with Governor DeWitt Clinton performing the Wedding of The Waters ceremony in New York Harbour.

1839   The Newport Rising: the last large-scale armed rebellion against authority in mainland Britain.

1852  Count Camillo Benso di Cavour became the prime minister of Piedmont-Sardinia.

1853 – Anna Bayerová, Czech physician, was born (d. 1924).

1861  The University of Washington opened in Seattle, Washington as the Territorial University.

1864  American Civil War: Battle of Johnsonville – Confederate troops bombarded a Union supply base and destroyed millions of dollars in material.

1879 – Will Rogers, American actor and screenwriter, was born (d. 1935).

1883 – Nikolaos Plastiras, Greek general and politician 135th Prime Minister of Greece, was born(d. 1953).

1884 – Harry Ferguson, Irish engineer, invented the tractor, was born(d. 1960).

1889  Menelek of Shoa obtained the allegiance of a large majority of the Ethiopian nobility, paving the way for him to be crowned emperor.

1890   London’s first deep-level tube railway opened between King William Street and Stockwell.

1896 – Carlos P. Garcia, Filipino lawyer and politician, 8th President of the Philippines was born(d. 1971).

1908 – Joseph Rotblat, Polish-English physicist and academic, Nobel Prize laureate was born (d. 2005).

1915 – Marguerite Patten, English home economist and author, was born (d. 2015).

1916  Ruth Handler, American businesswoman and inventor of the Barbie doll, was born (d. 2002).

1916 – Walter Cronkite, American journalist, voice actor, and producer, was born (d. 2009).

1918 – The New Zealand Division captured  Le Quesnoy.

New Zealand Division captures Le Quesnoy

1918  World War I: The Armistice of Villa Giusti between Italy and Austria-Hungary was implemented.

1918  The German Revolution began when 40,000 sailors took over the port in Kiel.

1921 The Sturmabteilung or SA was formed by Adolf Hitler.

1921   Japanese Prime Minister Hara Takashi was assassinated in Tokyo.

1921  The Italian unknown soldier was buried in the Altare della Patria (Fatherland Altar) in Rome.

1922 In Egypt, British archaeologist Howard Carter and his men found the entrance to Pharaoh Tutankhamun‘s tomb in the Valley of the Kings.

1924 Nellie Tayloe Ross of Wyoming was elected the first female governor in the United States.

1929  – Anastasios of Albania, Greek-Albanian archbishop, was born.

1930 Phar Lap won the Melbourne Cup.

Phar Lap wins the Melbourne Cup

1932 – Thomas Klestil, Austrian politician and diplomat, 10th President of Austria, was born (d. 2004).

1937  Loretta Swit, American actress, was born.

1939   World War II: U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt ordered the United States Customs Service to implement the Neutrality Act of 1939, allowing cash-and-carry purchases of weapons by belligerents.

1942   Second Battle of El Alamein – Disobeying a direct order by Adolf Hitler, General Field Marshal Erwin Rommel led his forces on a five-month retreat.

1944  World War II: Bitola Liberation Day.

1946  – Laura Bush, American educator, 50th First Lady of the United States was born.

1948  – Alexis Hunter, New Zealand-English painter and photographer, was born (d. 2014).

Photo of Alexis Hunter by Charles Thomson.jpg

1948 – Amadou Toumani Touré, Malian soldier and politician, President of Mali, was born.

1950 Charles Frazier, American author, was born.

1952   The United States government established the National Security Agency.

1955   After being totally destroyed in World War II, the rebuilt Vienna State Opera reopened with a performance of Beethoven’s Fidelio.

1956 James Honeyman-Scott, English guitarist (The Pretenders), was born (d. 1982)

1956   Soviet troops entered Hungary to end the Hungarian revolutionagainst the Soviet Union.

1957 Tony Abbott, Australia politician, Liberal leader, was born.

1962   In a test of the Nike-Hercules air defense missile, Shot Dominic-Tightrope was successfully detonated 69,000 feet above Johnston Island – the last atmospheric nuclear test conducted by the United States.

1966  Two-thirds of Florence was submerged as the River Arno floodedwith the contemporaneous flood of the Po River which led to 113 deaths, 30,000 made homeless, and the destruction of numerous Renaissance artworks and books.

1970  Genie, a 13-year-old feral child was found in Los Angeles, California having been locked in her bedroom for most of her life.

1973   The Netherlands experienced the first Car Free Sunday caused by the 1973 oil crisis.

1979   Iran hostage crisis began: a group of Iranians, mostly students, invaded the US embassy in Tehran and took 90 hostages.

1993   China Airlines Flight 605, overran Runway 13 at Hong Kong’s Kai Tak International Airport while landing during a typhoon, injuring 22 people.

1994   First conference that focused exclusively on the subject of the commercial potential of the World Wide Web.

1995  Israeli prime minister Yitzhak Rabin was assassinated by an extremist Orthodox Israeli.

2002  Chinese authorities arrested cyber-dissident He Depu for signing a pro-democracy letter to the 16th Communist Party Congress.

2008   Barack Obama became the first African-American to be elected President of the United States.

2008  Proposition 8 passed in California, representing the first elimination of an existing right to marry for LGBT couples.

2010  – Qantas Flight 32, an Airbus A380, suffered an uncontained engine failure over Indonesia shortly after taking off from Singapore, crippling the jet. The crew manage to safely return to Singapore, saving all 469 passengers and crew.

2011 – The Hellenic Parliament rejected a no-confidence motion against the Prime Minister of Greece George Papandreou following a failed attempt to hold a referendum on a Eurozone bailout.

2015  – A cargo plane crashed shortly after takeoff from Juba International Airport in Juba, South Sudan, killing 37 people.

2015 – A building collapsed in the Pakistani city of Lahore resulting in at least 45 deaths, at least 100 injured.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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