Word of the day

October 26, 2017

Gluggaveour – window weather; weather that looks appealing from inside but proves less pleasant in reality.


Rural round-up

October 26, 2017

Cabinet sorted, now the work can begin:

Confirmation of the new coalition government’s ministerial portfolios will provide greater clarity for farmers and the wider primary sector, says Federated Farmers.

The Labour-led coalition today unveiled some names familiar to farmers and some new to be acquaintances. Farmers would have noted the dismantling of The Ministry for Primary Industries, which was anticipated, with the splitting away of Forestry and Fisheries. . .

Primary Industries Ministry scrapped:

The Ministry for Primary Industries is being scrapped with a stripped down agriculture ministry and a range of special purpose bodies likely to replace it.

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has confirmed the ministry would go because it was not fit for purpose.

In her list of Cabinet appointments Damien O’Connor was named as agriculture minister.

He would also have the biosecurity, food safety and rural communities as separate portfolios. O’Connor would also associate minister for trade and export growth. . .

Synthetic meats are on their way, and our farmers are going to be left behind – Rosie Bosworth:

‘Fake’ animal proteins are set to disrupt world markets – and much faster than our agriculture industry is anticipating, argues food strategist Dr Rosie Bosworth.

New Zealand’s agricultural sector has been having a rough time of late. If waking up to a centre-left government wasn’t enough of a nightmare for most Kiwi farmers, then the negative media attention the industry has been racking up in recent weeks should be.

For decades, our agriculture sector and farming community have enjoyed prized economic-darling status in New Zealand. Policy makers, ministers and farmers alike have been convinced that agriculture is untouchable, and that the lucrative wave of creamy dairy milk and premium cuts of red meat on the global market would last forever – even if private farmer profits did come at a broader social and environmental cost for the nation. . . 

Dairy prices have downside risk – Keith Woodford:

Whenever I write about the dairy price outlook, the key messages are about volatility and unpredictability. Nevertheless, right now the risks are weighted to the downside.

There is considerable nervousness within the export trade about the next GDT auction in early November.   The auction acts as a barometer for the overall market.

This next auction will either confirm or reverse an emerging trend where buyers have been purchasing for immediate needs, but then quietly stepping back to the sidelines in regard to later deliveries.  . . 

Retired Oturehua farmer as busy as ever in community

Ken Gillespie may be a retired sheep and beef farmer, but he is still just as busy as ever, as he is involved with the area’s heritage, ice sports, tourism, irrigation, minimum flows, and various community projects, and he is a master of the flat white.

He takes tourists on tours, sits on an irrigation company, as well as on water strategy and water user groups, belongs to Lions, and is a wool classer for the Merino Shearing competition.

Described by a fellow wool classer, Graeme Bell, as an [honorary] mayor of Oturehua, Mr Gillespie was raised on his family’s farm, just down the road from where he and wife Helen now live. . . 

Shearing: NZ team looks to restore pride in Aussie tests :

Another team chocked with world champions is crossing the Tasman this week intent on restoring a bit of Kiwi pride after the All Blacks’ loss to the Wallabies in Brisbane last Saturday.

A Shearing Sports New Zealand team of seven, including four World champions and two World championship runners-up, will be competing in shearing and woolhandling tests against Australia at the Australian national shearing and woolhandling championships in Bendigo, Vic, on Friday and Saturday.

There will be separate machine shearing, woolhandling and blade shearing tests, with New Zealand trying to make it two-in a row after winning machine and woolhandling tests at the Golden Shears in Masterton in March and a blades shearing test at the Waimate Shears on October 14. . . 


Thursday’s quiz

October 26, 2017

You’re welcome to pose the questions.

Anyone who stumps everyone will win a virtual bunch of irises.


Fats Domino 26.2.28 – 24.10.17

October 26, 2017

The music world  has lost another voice:

Fats Domino, the New Orleans rhythm-and-blues singer whose two-fisted boogie-woogie piano and nonchalant vocals, heard on dozens of hits, made him one of the biggest stars of the early rock ’n’ roll era, has died in Louisiana. He was 89. . . 

Mr. Domino had more than three dozen Top 40 pop hits through the 1950s and early ’60s, among them “Blueberry Hill,” “Ain’t It a Shame” (also known as “Ain’t That a Shame,” which is the actual lyric), “I’m Walkin’,” “Blue Monday” and “Walkin’ to New Orleans.” Throughout he displayed both the buoyant spirit of New Orleans, his hometown, and a droll resilience that reached listeners worldwide.

He sold 65 million singles in those years, with 23 gold records, making him second only to Elvis Presley as a commercial force. Presley acknowledged Mr. Domino as a predecessor. . .

 


Can’t get prosperity by decree

October 26, 2017

The Employers and Manufacturers Association says the minimum wage increases announced by the government could “bring the economy to a grinding halt”.

Employers and Manufacturers Association (EMA) chief executive Kim Campbell said the initial increase was not much more than what a National-led Government would have implemented.

However, he saw the $20-an-hour target as too high and it meant New Zealand would have among the highest minimum wages in the world.

“The first step was well signalled… and it’s not very responsible signalling it so well in advance because it sets up inflationary expectations,” he said.

“You can already see a reflection of that in our exchange rate, which has gone down because overseas they can sees that New Zealand’s costs are going up.

A drop in the exchange rate will make our exports less expensive overseas but it will add to the cost of imports including clothes, fertilizer, fuel, machinery, medicine and vehicles.

“Exporters are going to do a bit better but you’d have to do the sums to see how they land but it will all turn into an inflationary spiral which is a really good way to bring the economy to a grinding halt.”

Campbell said businesses would be worried by what the cost increases would mean for them. . . 

Businesses have got used to gradual increases in the minimum wage and have factored them into their planning.

But getting to $20 by 2021 is too much too fast for many.

We had dinner out on Tuesday evening.

The business owner, unprompted, told me she was very worried about the new government. “People already say dining out is expensive, but if we have to pay too much more for wages we will have no choice but to increase prices.”

That’s how the inflation spiral starts – with wage increases which aren’t related to productivity increases or other cost decreases.

And that’s what drives business owners to look at ways to reduce staff numbers, including more mechanisation.

Robots are expensive now, but improvements in technology and increases in production will bring prices down.

You can’t get prosperity by decree and attempts to reduce or eliminate poverty by imposing unrealistic rises in wages will threaten business sustainability and job security.


Quote of the day

October 26, 2017

If a man has any greatness in him, it comes to light, not in one flamboyant hour, but in the ledger of his daily work. – Beryl Markham who was born on this day in 1902.


October 26 in history

October 26, 2017

306  Martyrdom of Saint Demetrius of Thessaloniki.

1597  Imjin War: Admiral Yi Sun-sin routed the Japanese Navy of 300 ships with only 13 ships at the Battle of Myeongnyang.

1640 The Treaty of Ripon was signed, restoring peace between Scotland and Charles I of England.

1689  General Piccolomini of Austria burned down Skopje to prevent the spread of cholera. He died of cholera soon after.

1774  The first Continental Congress adjourned in Philadelphia.

1775  King  George III went before Parliament to declare the American colonies in rebellion, and authorised a military response to quell the American Revolution.

1776  Benjamin Franklin departed from America for France on a mission to seek French support for the American Revolution.

1795  The French Directory, a five-man revolutionary government, was created.

1811  The Argentine government declared the freedom of expression for the press by decree.

1825 The Erie Canal opened – passage from Albany, New York to Lake Erie.

1859 The Royal Charter was wrecked on the coast of Anglesey, north Wales with 459 dead.

1860  Meeting of TeanoGiuseppe Garibaldi, conqueror of the Kingdom of Two Sicilies, gives it to King Victor Emmanuel II of Italy.

1861  The Pony Express officially ceased operations.

1865  Benjamin Guggenheim, American businessman, was born (d. 1912).

1869 – Washington Luís, Brazilian lawyer and politician, 13th President of Brazil, was born (d. 1957).

1873 – Thorvald Stauning, Danish union leader and politician, 24th Prime Minister of Denmark, was born (d. 1942).

1874 – Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, American philanthropist, founded the Museum of Modern Art (d. 1948).

1881  The Gunfight at the O.K. Corral.

1883  Napoleon Hill, American writer and philosopher, was born (d. 1970).

1902  – Beryl Markham, Kenyan horse trainer and author, was born (d. 1986).

1905 Norway became independent from Sweden.

1909 Itō Hirobumi, Resident-General of Korea, was shot to death by Korean independence supporter Ahn Jung-geun.

1911 – Sorley MacLean, Scottish poet and educator, was born (d. 1996).

1912  First Balkan War: The capital city of Macedonia, Thessaloniki, was unified with Greece on the feast day of its patron Saint Demetrius. Serbian troops captured Skopje.

1916 François Mitterrand, President of France, was born (d. 1996).

1917   Battle of Caporetto; Italy was defeated by the forces of Austria-Hungary and Germany. The young unknown Oberleutnant Erwin Rommelcaptured Mount Matajur with only 100 Germans against a force of over 7000 Italians.

1918  Erich Ludendorff, quartermaster-general of the Imperial German Army, was dismissed by Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany for refusing to cooperate in peace negotiations.

1919 – Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, Shah of Iran, was born (d. 1980).

1920 – Sarah Lee Lippincott, American astronomer and academic, was born.

1921  The Chicago Theatre opened.

1928 – Francisco Solano López, Argentinian illustrator, was born (d. 2011).

1936  The first electric generator at Hoover Dam went into full operation.

1940  The P-51 Mustang made its maiden flight.

1942 The Women’s Jurors Act enabled women to sit on juries in New Zealand.

Women Jurors Act allows women to sit on juries

1942  Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands: U.S. aircraft carrier, Hornet, was sunk and another aircraft carrier, Enterprise, was heavily damaged.

1943 World War II: First flight of the Dornier Do 335 “Pfeil”.

1944  World War II: The Battle of Leyte Gulf ended with an overwhelming American victory.

1947  Hillary Rodham Clinton, 67th United States Secretary of State, was born.

1947 The Maharaja of Kashmir agreed to allow his kingdom to join India.

1948  Killer smog settled into Donora, Pennsylvania.

1955  After the last Allied troops left the country and following the provisions of the Austrian Independence Treaty, Austria declared permanent neutrality.

1955 – Ngô Đình Diệm declared himself Premier of South Vietnam.

1958  Pan American Airways made the first commercial flight of the Boeing 707 from New York City to Paris, France.

1959  The world saw the far side of the Moon for the first time.

1964 Eric Edgar Cooke became last person in Western Australia to be executed.

1965 – Ken Rutherford, New Zealand cricketer, was born.

1967 – Keith Urban, New Zealand singer-songwriter and guitarist (The Ranch), was born.

1967  Mohammad Reza Pahlavi crowned himself Emperor of Iran and then crowned his wife Farah Empress of Iran.

1977 The last natural case of smallpox was discovered in Merca district, Somalia. The WHO and the CDC consider this date the anniversary of the eradication of smallpox, the most spectacular success of vaccination.

1979  Park Chung-hee, President of South Korea was assassinated by KCIA head Kim Jae-kyu. Choi Kyu-ha becomes the acting President.

1984  ”Baby Fae” received a heart transplant from a baboon.

1985  The Australian government returns ownership of Uluru to the local Pitjantjatjara Aborigines.

1992 The London Ambulance Service was thrown into chaos after the implementation of a new CAD, (Computer Aided Despatch) system which failed.

1994 Jordan and Israel signed a peace treaty

1995  Israeli-Palestinian Conflict: Mossad agents assassinated Islamic Jihad leader Fathi Shikaki.

1999  Britain’s House of Lords voted to end the right of hereditary peersto vote in Britain’s upper chamber of Parliament.

2000  Laurent Gbagbo took over as president of Côte d’Ivoire following a popular uprising against President Robert Guéï.

2002 Moscow Theatre Siege: Around 50 Chechen terrorists and 150 hostages die when Russian Spetsnaz stormed a theatre building in Moscow, which had been occupied by the terrorists three days before.

2003  The Cedar Fire, the second-largest fire in California history, killed 15 people, consumed 250,000 acres (1,000 km²), and destroyed 2,200 homes around San Diego.

2014 – Britain withdrew from Afghanistan after the end of Operation Herrick which started on June 20, 2002 after 12 years four months and seven days.

2015 – A 7.5 magnitude earthquake struck in the Hindu Kush mountain range in northeastern Afghanistan, killing 398 people and leaving 2,536 people injured.

2016 – – An earthquake of magnitude 6.6 struck central Italy.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia.


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