Word of the day

October 10, 2017

Shackbaggerly – in a loose, disorderly manner.


Rural round-up

October 10, 2017

Dairy company Synlait to spend on research at Massey University – Jill Galloway:

A rival to dairy giant Fonterra could spend millions of dollars on research in Manawatū.

Canterbury-based dairy company Synlait will use some of its $7 million annual research and development budget at Massey University and its FoodPILOT​ unit.

It wants to spend the money on innovation, specifically on processing and packaging, as well as new products, and plans to develop a new centre for its operations. . . 

Mataura Valley Milk something special – Bernard May:

Mataura Valley Milk is creating something special just north of Gore.

We’re building a highly specialised nutrition plant unlike any other in Australasia to manufacture premium nutritional formulas.

It’s a completely different business from a dairy company, as we will be making highly functional and high-value products to order.

Mataura Valley Milk is a positive, and many would argue necessary, addition to the dairy industry in Southland. . . 

Tihoi Farm finds right balance:

Taking part in DairyNZ’s P21 research programme has helped Parkhill Farms to not only reduce its environmental impact, but also maintain profitability.

Chris Robinson of Parkhill Farms values having a choice about which farming system he wants to run. However, he also values water quality and understands that regional regulations limiting nutrient loss from his operation will affect his farming practice.

In 2015, DairyNZ was searching for a commercial farm on which to apply research proven at a farmlet scale. For Chris and brother-in-law Richard Webber, it was a great opportunity to investigate changes to their farming system to meet potentially conflicting goals. And so the P21 Focus Farm was created. . . 

Feds calls for stable and responsible government negotiations:

 

Next week promises to be a defining period for negotiations to form a new government and Federated Farmers is asking that whoever governs is pragmatic about future actions.

“Federated Farmers is ready to work with any government. We are an advocacy organisation for farmers, it is our job to work with all government, and opposition, representatives,” Federated Farmers president Katie Milne says. . . 

Rural video blogger shares positive farming stories – Brad Markham:

Staring down the barrel of a camera, Sophie Brown is momentarily distracted by a noisy, low-flying plane overhead.

The usually unflappable Taranaki farmer quickly tilts her camera skyward, attempting to catch a glimpse of the winged intruder.

The chatty blonde’s out in an old barn introducing viewers of her video blog to the 80 bull calves she’s rearing this spring. . .

Farmers Fast Five: Sophie Brown – Claire Inkson:

Proud to be a Farmer Farmers Fast Five: Where we ask a farmer five quick questions about farming, and what agriculture means to them. Today we talk to Heels 2 Boots Video Blogger and Proud Farmer Sophie Brown

How long have you been farming?

I honestly don’t know when I became a farmer. Coming from the city, farming wasn’t natural to me, so when I started dating my husband eight years ago, everything farm related was new! Three years ago when we moved to the new family farm, I gave up my day job, so I guess I became a ‘farmer in training’ then! I only recently, on a departure card at the airport, described myself as a farmer, that was a big step for me! . . 


No more Rural Delivery?

October 10, 2017

The future of Rural Delivery is under threat after missing out on NZ On Air funding:

Federated Farmers is disappointed to learn that TVNZ’s Rural Delivery programme has missed out on the latest round of NZ on Air funding.

The programme which profiles rural New Zealand and the primary sector, highlighting farmer ingenuity and innovation is now facing an uncertain future as it considers other funding options.

“One has to question the decision making at the NZ on Air. From what I know their programming is supposed to reflect and develop New Zealand identity and culture, ” says Katie Milne, Federated Farmers National President.

“Rural Delivery surely meets that criteria and has done for the past 13 years-so what has changed?”

“This show has been attracting on average over 50,000 viewers per episode, which in the today’s competitive broadcasting environment is pretty reasonable for screening at 7am on weekends.”

The timing of decision is also unfortunate as the agriculture sector, especially farming is becoming increasingly concerned about its image among urban New Zealanders highlighted by the recent political campaigning.

“We’ve been saying this for some time now, the need for urban and rural New Zealand to reconnect. Our challenge, as farmers, is to tell our story and we rely on programming like Rural Delivery to help get that message across.”

Katie says the programme deserves a future and perhaps a different time slot from the current weekend time, would attract a bigger and more diverse audience.

“I’m not convinced that NZ on Air’s decision reflects the opinions of most kiwis. This type of programming is still popular with the mainstream and if it can’t be saved it will be a sad day for New Zealand broadcasting, as was the case with the The Dog Show,” says Katie.

Rural Delivery is available on demand  so the 7am Saturday time slot isn’t much of an issue.

The programme is sponsored by Rabobank and it might be able to find more sponsors but the failure to get NZ On Air funding threatens its ability to continue.

The loss of one of the few  programmes which informs and educates, treats its audience as intelligent and showcases positive rural people and developments is concerning.

New Zealand is unique in the developed world for the importance of agriculture to its economy.

When the majority of the population are urban based and have little connection to or knowledge of agriculture and wider rural issues,  the media plays a vital role in bridging the rural-urban divide.

There aren’t many quality planks in the bridge between town and country. It would be a great loss if this one was cut out.


Who’s the good guy?

October 10, 2017

There’s several things I don’t understand about the USA:

That they’ve had decimal currency since forever but still use imperial measurements.

That their notes and coins are very difficult to distinguish from each other.

And their attachment to weapons:


Quote of the day

October 10, 2017

Love and magic have a great deal in common. They enrich the soul, delight the heart. And they both take practice. –  Nora Roberts who celebrates her 67th birthday today.


October 10 in history

October 10, 2017

680  Battle of Karbala: Hussain bin Ali, the grandson of the Prophet Muhammad, was decapitated by forces under Caliph Yazid I.

732  Battle of Tours: The leader of the Franks, Charles Martel and his men, defeated a large army of Moors, stopping the Muslims from spreading into Western Europe. The governor of Cordoba, Abdul Rahman Al Ghafiqi, was killed during the battle.

1471  Battle of Brunkeberg: Sten Sture the Elder, the Regent of Sweden, with the help of farmers and miners, repelled an attack by Christian I, King of Denmark.

1575 Battle of Dormans: Roman Catholic forces under Duke Henry of Guise defeat the Protestants, capturing Philippe de Mornay among others.

1580  After a three-day siege, the English Army beheaded over 600 Irish and Papal soldiers and civilians at Dún an Óir, Ireland.

1780 The Great Hurricane of 1780 killed 20,000-30,000 in the Caribbean.

1813 Giuseppe Verdi, Italian composer, was born (d. 1901).

1830 Queen Isabella II, of Spain, was born (d. 1904).

1845  In Annapolis, Maryland, the Naval School (later renamed theUnited States Naval Academy) opened with 50 midshipmen students and seven professors.

1868  Carlos Céspedes issued the Grito de Yara from his plantation, La Demajagua, proclaiming Cuba’s independence.

1877 – William Morris, 1st Viscount Nuffield, English businessman and philanthropist, founded Morris Motors, was born (d. 1963).

1900 Helen Hayes, American actress, was born (d. 1993).

1911  The Wuchang Uprising led to the demise of Qing Dynasty, the last Imperial court in China, and the founding of the Republic of China.

1911  The KCR East Rail commenced service between KowloonandCanton.

1913  President Woodrow Wilson triggered the explosion of the Gamboa Dike, ending construction on the Panama Canal.

1920 The Carinthian Plebiscite determined that the larger part of Carinthia should remain part of Austria.

1923 Nicholas Parsons, English actor, was born.

1930 Harold Pinter, English playwright, Nobel laureate, was born (d. 2008)

1933  United Airlines Chesterton Crash: A United Airlines Boeing 247 was destroyed by sabotage

1935 A coup d’état by the royalist leadership of the Greek Armed Forces tak overthrew the government of Panagis Tsaldaris and established a regency under Georgios Kondylis, effectively ending the Second Hellenic Republic.

1938 The Munich Agreement ceded the Sudetenland to Nazi Germany.

1943  Double Tenth Incident in Japanese controlled Singapore.

1944 Holocaust: 800 Gypsy children were murdered at Auschwitz concentration camp.

1945  The Chinese Communist Party and the Kuomintang signed a principle agreement in Chongqing about the future of post-war China – the Double-Ten Agreement.

1950 Nora Roberts, American novelist, was born.

1957  U.S. President Dwight D. Eisenhower apologised to the finance minister of Ghana, Komla Agbeli Gbdemah, after he was refused service in a Dover, Delaware restaurant.

1957 – The Windscale fire in Cumbria –  the world’s first major nuclear accident.

1963  France ceded control of the Bizerte naval base to Tunisia.

1964  The opening ceremony at The 1964 Summer Olympics in Tokyo, was broadcast live in the first Olympic telecast relayed by geostationary communication satellite.

1967 The Outer Space Treaty, signed on January 27 by more than sixty nations, comes into force.

1970  Fiji became independent.

1970 – In Montreal, Vice-Premier and Minister of Labour Pierre Laporte became the second statesman kidnapped by members of the FLQ terrorist group.

1971 London Bridge reopened in Lake Havasu City, Arizona.

1973  Vice President of the United States Spiro Agnew resigned after being charged with federal income tax evasion.

1975 The government created the Waitangi Tribunal to hear Maori claims of breaches of the Treaty of Waitangi by successive New Zealand governments.

Waitangi Tribunal created

1978 – Caroline Meyer and Georgina Earl, (nee Evers-Swindell), Olympic gold medal rowers were born.

1985  United States Navy F-14 fighter jets intercepted an Egyptian plane carrying the Achille Lauro cruise ship hijackers and forced it to land at a NATO base in Sigonella, Sicily.

1986 An earthquake measuring 7.5 on the Richter Scale in San Salvador killed an estimated 1,500 people.

1997  An Austral Airlines DC-9-32 crashed and exploded near Nuevo Berlin, Uruguay, killing 74.

1998  A Lignes Aériennes Congolaises Boeing 727 was shot down by rebels in Kindu, Democratic Republic of the Congo, killing 41 people.

2006  The Greek city of Volos flooded in one of the prefecture’s worst recorded floods.

2008 The 10 October 2008 Orakzai bombing killed 110 and injured 200 more.

2009  Armenia and Turkey signed protocols in Zurich, Switzerland to open their borders which had been closed for about 200 years.

2010 – The Netherlands Antilles were dissolved.

2010 – Cable channel The Hub made its debut in the United States.

2015 – Twin bomb blasts in the Turkish capital Ankara near the main train station killed at least 102 people and wounded more than 400.

Sourced from NZ history Online & Wikipedia


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