Word of the day

October 2, 2017

Strategery – humorous and often ironic alternate form of strategy; the use of devious or dishonest schemes, tricks, or ploys, in order to achieve a particular end.


Rural round-up

October 2, 2017

The wheat and chaff of synthetic food – Keith Woodford:

It has become fashionable for agri-food commentators to talk of disruptive change. In particular, in recent months there has been much talk about industry disruption that will supposedly occur from synthetic food, with much of that grown in a laboratory.

Until now, I have steered clear of discussing synthetic food, despite often being asked my opinion. But now, I have decided to venture forth.

The simple answer is that synthetic food does not need to be a big concern for New Zealand farmers. The important proviso is that New Zealand farmers, and the associated value chains connecting through to markets, need to focus on consumers who will pay premium prices for products that are the ‘real McCoy’. . .

Hawea Flat water table levels lowest on record:

The Upper Clutha Farmers Group are becoming increasingly concerned about the drain Contact Energy is having on the Hawea Flat water supply.

Lake Hawea’ s water level follows a seasonal cycle which is controlled by Contact Energy to provide electricity supply when demand is at its peak. The Group’s concern stems from Contact’s move to lower operating levels in lake Hawea to generate more electricity.

Traditionally spring is when the lake’s level is at its lowest, however the current level is the lowest since monitoring began. The farming community believe with Contact change of operating levels it is having a far greater effect on the ground water flows through the aquafers in the Hawea Flat region. . .

Westland Milk Products breaks even for 2016-17:

Westland Milk Products has recovered from a loss in the 12 months ended July 31, 2016, to post a break-even profit before tax for the 2016-17 financial year.

The company, New Zealand’s second largest dairy co-operative, said the result represented a total payout to its 342 shareholders of $338.7million, a net average cash payout of $5.18/kgms. . . 

Technology could change the future of food – Alexa Cook:

Rapid change in the food sector could mean eight out of the top 10 global food companies out of business in the next decade, a researcher says.

The Te Hono Stanford University Bootcamp is a week-long intensive programme and this year the focus was how to accelerate New Zealand’s food production in the global marketplace.

Plant and Food Research chief operating officer Bruce Campbell said the message from the US was clear.

“There’s quite significant disruption coming for the food sector. . .

NZ scientists aim to breed super berry – Alexa Cook:

Scientists are investigating the potential for a new commercial crop of a “super” hybrid blueberry.

Plant & Food Research is trying to breed a fruit that combines the taste and growing characteristics of blueberries with the colourful flesh of bilberries.

Bilberries are a small berry from Northern Europe with dark blue-red flesh, but with a thin skin they’re too delicate to grow commercially because the fruit is easily damaged in transit. . .

Ballance Farm Environment Awards give farmers place to share their good stories:

The environment, water quality and urban perception of farming is more important than it’s ever been, says 2017 Canterbury Ballance Farm Environment Awards finalist Lyndon Matthews.

“This election has been polarised around water quality. My belief is farmers are doing great stuff but we’re not so good at telling our story. That’s one of the reasons these awards are so important – telling the stories.

“Personally we’ve always been happy to put ourselves up for scrutiny. If it’s a good story we want to share it and if it’s not, we want to learn. Some people are worried about putting their head above the parapet but farmers have to be prepared to open ourselves to scrutiny. More farmers need to show what they’re doing.” . .

 


Blue-green more sustainable than red

October 2, 2017

Waikato social work student Nathan Williams analysed voting at university campuses and found a majority voted National at only two.

The biggest percentage vote for National was at Lincoln which given it specialises in agriculture isn’t surprising.

The Green Party did worst at Lincoln, though still better there than it did overall.

Williams also used the data from the Electoral Commission to show how parliament would look if only university students voted.

Not all votes at campuses would have been from students and a high number of students at Otago and others which attract a majority who live away from home would have cast special votes for their home electorates.

But it’s reasonable to assume most would have been students and therefore more would have been younger than at other polling stations.

This supports the view that the Green Party gets more support from younger people.

Their failure to keep that support as people age is another argument against their marooning themselves on the far left of the political spectrum.

The environment isn’t socialist.

Ag students who voted blue could be just as passionate about the environment as any who voted Green.

The blue-green view of sustainability – balancing environmental, economic and social concerns, is both more practical and sustainable than the Green one which is red.


Quote of the day

October 2, 2017

 War springs from the love and loyalty which should be offered to God being applied to some God substitute, one of the most dangerous being nationalism. –  Robert Runcie who was born on this day in 1921.


October 2 in history

October 2, 2017

1187 Siege of Jerusalem: Saladin captured Jerusalem after 88 years of Crusader rule.

1263  The battle of Largs between Norwegians and Scots.

1535 Jacques Cartier discovered Montreal.

1552 Conquest of Kazan by Ivan the Terrible.

1780 John André, British Army officer, was hanged as a spy by American forces.

1789  George Washington sent the proposed Constitutional amendments (The United States Bill of Rights) to the States for ratification.

1800 Nat Turner, American leader of slave uprising, was born (d. 1831)

1814  Battle of Rancagua: Spanish Royalists troops under Mariano Osorio defeated rebel Chilean forces of Bernardo O’Higgins and Jose Miguel Carrera.

1835  The Texas Revolution began with the Battle of Gonzales:Mexicansoldiers attempted to disarm the people of Gonzales but encountered stiff resistance from a hastily assembled militia.

1851  The pasilalinic-sympathetic compass was demonstrated but proved to be a fake.

1852  William Ramsay, Scottish chemist who discovered noble gases, was born (d. 1916).

1864  American Civil War: Battle of Saltville – Union forces attacked Saltville, Virginia, but were defeated by Confederate troops.

1889  In Colorado, Nicholas Creede struck silver during the last great silver boom of the American Old West.

1890 Groucho Marx, American comedian and actor, was born (d. 1977).

1904 Graham Greene, British novelist, was born (d. 1991).

1907  Alexander R. Todd, Baron Todd, Scottish chemist, Nobel laureate, was born (d. 1997).

1919  US President Woodrow Wilson suffered a  stroke, leaving him partially paralysed.

1921 Robert Runcie, Archbishop of Canterbury, was born (d. 2000).

1924  The Geneva Protocol was adopted as a means to strengthen the League of Nations.

1925  John Logie Baird performed the first test of a working television system.

1928 The “Prelature of the Holy Cross and the Work of God”, commonly known as Opus Dei, was founded by Saint Josemaría Escrivá.

1938  Tiberias massacre: Arabs murdered 20 Jews.

1941  Pilot Officer Carlyle Everiss – a New Zealand fighter pilot saved the lives of countless people in the Scottish village of Cowie by staying with his crippled plane to steer it away from houses.

NZ pilot saves Scottish village

1941  World War II: Operation Typhoon, Germany began an all-out offensive against Moscow.

1944 World War II: Nazi troops ended the Warsaw Uprising.

1948 Donna Karan, American fashion designer, was born.

1949 Annie Leibovitz, American photographer, was born.

1950  Peanuts by Charles M. Schulz was first published

1950 Mike Rutherford, English musician (Genesis), was born.

1951 Sting, English musician and actor, was born.

1958 Guinea declared its independence from France.

1959  The anthology series The Twilight Zone premiered on CBS television.

1967  Thurgood Marshall was sworn in as the first African-American justice of United States Supreme Court.

1968 A peaceful student demonstration in Mexico City culminated in theTlatelolco massacre.

1970 A plane carrying the Wichita State University football team, administrators, and supporters crashed in Colorado killing 31 people.

1986 – ‘Slice of Heaven’  hits No. 1.

1990 A Chinese airline Boeing 737-247 was hijacked; after landing at Guangzhou, it crashed into two airliners on the ground, killing 132 people.

1992 The Carandiru Massacre after a riot in the Carandiru Penitentiary in São Paulo, Brazil.

1996  The Electronic Freedom of Information Act Amendments were signed by U.S. President Bill Clinton.

1996  An AeroPerú Boeing 757 crashed in Pacific Ocean shortly after takeoff from Lima, Peru, killing 70.

1997   European Union: The Amsterdam Treaty was signed.

2001  Swissair liquidated and the airline was replaced by SWISS.

2002  The Beltway sniper attacks began.

2004 American Samoa joined the North American Numbering Plan.

2005 Ethan Allen Boating Accident: The Ethan Allen tour boat capsizes on Lake George, killing twenty people.

2006  Five school girls were murdered by Charles Carl Roberts in ashooting at an Amish school in Nickel Mines, Pennsylvania.

2007  President Roh Moo-hyun of South Korea walked across the Military Demarcation Line into North Korea on his way to the second Inter-Korean Summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Il.

2009 The Twenty-eighth Amendment of the Constitution of Ireland was approved at the second attempt, permitting the state to ratify the European Union’s Treaty of Lisbon.

Sourced from NZ History & Wikipedia


%d bloggers like this: