Word of the day

September 24, 2017

Hypnagogic  –  of, relating to, or occurring in the period of drowsiness immediately preceding sleep; inducing drowsiness or sleep; soporific.


Your Light

September 24, 2017

Your Light

Let me say this clearly because it is time to remember you are always the light you see by; and if it is dark in th eplaces you look it is only because you still pretend the light will have to come from someone else. –   © 2017 Brian Andreas – posted with permission.

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Bill’s back up again

September 24, 2017

When Bill English was asked during a debate what was different about him in 2002 and now, he said, “I got back up again.”

There’s no better proof of that than National’s result in the election.

Whatever the outcome of coalition negotiations, he has proved himself and his leadership.

Those, including some in the media who ought to have known better, may well be surprised at how well he, and National, have done.

Those of us who know him aren’t.

He’s a good man, with a big heart and strong intellect.

He’s warm, witty and wise.

He has a clear vision for New Zealand and its people, plans on what to do to deliver for us all and the drive and determination essential to succeed in that.

Many thought John Key’s decision to retire would weaken National and reduce its chances of a fourth term.

Bill English and his team have proved them wrong.

The fourth term isn’t certain but he’s made it a possibility.

Bill rocks!


Sunday soapbox

September 24, 2017

Sunday’s soapbox is yours to use as you will – within the bounds of decency and absence of defamation. You’re welcome to look back or forward, discuss issues of the moment, to pontificate, ponder or point us to something of interest, to educate, elucidate or entertain, amuse, bemuse or simply muse, but not abuse.

Image result for quotes daylight saving

Most people recover from deadly diseases better than I recover from daylight savings.


September 24 in history

September 24, 2017

622 Prophet Muhammad completed his hijra from Mecca to Medina.

1180 Manuel I Komnenos, last Emperor of the Komnenian restoration died after which the Byzantine Empire slipped into terminal decline.

1625 Johan de Witt, Dutch politician, was born (d. 1672).

1645  Battle of Rowton Heath, Parliamentarian victory over a Royalist army commanded in person by King Charles.

1664 The Dutch Republic surrendered New Amsterdam to England.

1667 – Jean-Louis Lully, French composer, was born (d. 1688).

1674  Second Tantrik Coronation of Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj.

1717 Horace Walpole, British novelist and politician, was born (d. 1797).

1725 Sir Arthur Guinness, Irish brewer, was born (d. 1803).

1841  The Sultan of Brunei ceded Sarawak to Britain.

1852  The first airship powered by (a steam) engine, created by Henri Giffard, travelled 17 miles (27 km) from Paris to Trappes.

1869 “Black Friday“: Gold prices plummeted after Ulysses S. Grant ordered the Treasury to sell large quantities of gold after Jay Gould and James Fisk plotted to control the market.

1871 –  Lottie Dod, English athlete, was born (d. 1960)

1877  Battle of Shiroyama, decisive victory of the Imperial Japanese Army over the Satsuma Rebellion.

1890 The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints officially renounced polygamy.

1892 – Adélard Godbout, Canadian agronomist and politician, 15th Premier of Québec, was born (d. 1956).

1896 F. Scott Fitzgerald, American novelist, was born (d. 1940).

1898 – Charlotte Moore Sitterly, American astronomer, was born (d. 1990).

1905 Lionel Terry killed Joe Kum Yung to draw attention to his crusade to rid New Zealand of Chinese people.

Race killing in Haining St, Wellington

1906  U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt proclaimed Devils Tower in Wyoming as the nation’s first National Monument.

1914 Sir John Kerr, 18th Governor-General of Australia, was born (d. 1991).

1916 – Ruth Leach Amonette, American businesswoman and author, was born (d. 2004).

1917 – Ten New Zealand soldiers were killed when they were hit by a train at Bere Ferrers in the United Kingdom.

Bere Ferrers rail accident

1935  Earl Bascom and Weldon Bascom produced the first rodeo ever held outdoors under electric lights at Columbia, Mississippi.

1936 Jim Henson, American puppeteer, was born (d. 1990).

1941 Linda McCartney, American singer, fashion designer and photographer, was born (d. 1998).

1942 Gerry Marsden, English singer (Gerry & The Pacemakers), was born.

1946  Cathay Pacific Airways was founded in Hong Kong.

1946 – Lars Emil Johansen, Greenlandic educator and politician, 2nd Prime Minister of Greenland, was born.

1947 The Majestic 12 committee was allegedly established by secret executive order of President Harry Truman.

1948 – Garth Porter, New Zealand-Australian singer-songwriter and producer, was born.

1948  The Honda Motor Company was founded.

1950  Forest fires blacked out the sun over portions of Canada and New England. A Blue moon (in the astronomical sense) was seen as far away as Europe.

1957  Camp Nou, the largest stadium in Europe, was opened in Barcelona.

1957 President Dwight D. Eisenhower sent 101st Airborne Division troops to Little Rock, Arkansas, to enforce desegregation.

1962  United States court of appeals ordered the University of Mississippi to admit James Meredith.

1968  60 Minutes debuted on CBS.

1973  Guinea-Bissau declared its independence from Portugal.

1979  Compu-Serve launched the first consumer internet service, which features the first public electronic mail service.

1990  Periodic Great White Spot observed on Saturn.

1994  National League for Democracy was formed by Aung San Suu Kyi and various others to help fight against dictatorship in Myanmar.

1996  U.S. President Bill Clinton signed the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty at the United Nations.

2005  Hurricane Rita made landfall in the United States, devastating Beaumont, Texas and portions of southwestern Louisiana.

2008  The Trump International Hotel and Tower in Chicago was topped off at 1,389 feet (423 m), at the time becoming the world’s highest residence above ground-level.

2009 – The G20 summit began in Pittsburgh with 30 global leaders in attendance. It marked the first use of LRAD in U.S. history.

2013  A 7.7-magnitude earthquake struck southern Pakistan, killing more than 327 people.

2014 – The Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM), a Mars orbiter launched into Earth orbit by the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO), successfully inserted into orbit of Mars.

2015 – At least 1,100 people are killed and another 934 wounded after a stampede during the Hajj in Saudi Arabia.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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