Word of the day

July 13, 2017

Friluftsliv – free air life; the  Scandinavian philosophy of living in close spiritual connection with nature.


Young Farmers and future ag benefit from bequest

July 13, 2017

A media release from Young Farmers announces the bequest of a farm to the organisation:

NZ Young Farmers have been donated a 74-hectare farm in Auckland and will use it as a vehicle to showcase agriculture to New Zealand youth.
Located between Manurewa and Whitford, the dairy farm was generously donated by the late Donald Pearson.
NZ Young Farmers CEO Terry Copeland said the farm would be a vehicle into the future and will offer exponential opportunities in displaying a wide range of industries including, horticulture, dairy and sheep and beef operations.
“This is not a money making exercise for NZ Young Famers but rather an amazing opportunity to further our emphasis on engaging with students in Auckland schools to showcase the vast array of careers available in the Agri-sector.”
Although details are yet to be finalised, Mr Copeland said he expected the farm to be a doorway to innovative technology and a masterclass in the future of farming.
“There is enormous possibilities and we are excited about the partnerships this will bring across the industry to communicate the opportunities the sector can offer New Zealand’s youth.
To have this facility in the heart of Auckland presented a substantial asset the industry needs and will play a significant in the Ministry of Primary Industries target of attracting an extra 50 000 employees to the sector by 2025.”
Recently Mr Copeland spoke of the need to make Auckland the next emphasis for attracting youth into Agri-food careers.
“How do we engage with the next generation in Auckland? Currently 39 per cent of all high school students in New Zealand reside in Auckland and only 29 per cent of all students reside in rural areas, so we have a real problem and this farm will give us a solution.”
Mr Copeland said NZ Young Farmers through its PGP partnership with DairyNZ and RMPP funding, is constantly working with urban schools to sell a positive message around Agri careers and the farm would add stronger foundations to that message.
“We will be able to let as many students as possible visit, explore and view the incredible opportunities this sector offers.”
The gift itself was extraordinary, because Mr Pearson (who has no children of his own) had no formal relationship with NZ Young Farmers, he said.
“But he knew he didn’t want his land carved up and sold off to residential housing. His passion for agriculture and belief in the organisation to use it to bring people into the sector has left a legacy that all of the Agri-sector will celebrate for decades to come.”
Donald’s friend Bryan said he and his Father in Law, Graham were keen to help NZ Young Farmers to set up the farm because they wanted to realise his dream.
The gift would ensure the farm’s future, with Bryan reporting he had already had one developer approach them.
“Donald initially didn’t know what he wanted to do with the farm if he died, but he knew what he didn’t want to happen, which was to have it end up all subdivided.”
NZ Young Farmers chairperson Jason Te Brake was excited about the opportunities the farm now afforded the organisation.
“The gifting of the farm was an extremely generous donation by Donald, and one which will play a significant role in allowing NZ Young Farmers to continue to connect and develop the future people of the primary industries. The farm is intended to showcase the primary industries to New Zealand youth, and this aligns perfectly with NZ Young Farmers strategic direction and compliments the rewarding results we are already achieving through our school based programmes.”
The farm will begin trading under NZ Young Farmers from September.

This farm would be worth about $3 million in the country. It’s development potential in Auckland  would make it even more valuable.

This is a very generous bequest and provides a wonderful opportunity for Young Farmers to close the urban-rural divide.

Agriculture, horticulture and supporting industries are in desperate need of staff yet they aren’t seen as attractive career opportunities by many city-raised young people.

This farm will help Young Farmers show case agriculture and horticulture to city kids and open their eyes to work and business opportunities.

It will also help teach them that farming can be sustainable – economically, socially and environmentally.


Thursday’s quiz

July 13, 2017

You’re invited to pose the questions,

Anyone who stumps everyone will win a virtual chocolate sinker.


Rural round-up

July 13, 2017

Oritain, GE Healthcare form serum testing partnership – Sally Rae:

Oritain has partnered with global medical technology giant GE Healthcare to run a test-based traceability programme to authenticate country of origin of foetal bovine serum (FBS), used in human and animal health vaccines.

Since its establishment in 2008, the Mosgiel-based company has been a global leader in using forensic science to determine product provenance.

Operations director Dr Sam Lind described the partnership as ”very significant”, not only cementing the work the company was doing within that industry, but also the opportunity to work with such a global company. . .

Productivity and quality pay off for Matarae – Sally Rae:

At Matarae Station, Willie and Emily Jones have a strong focus on development and production.

The couple, with young sons Archie and Digby, lease the 5500ha Strath Taieri property from Mr Jones’ parents, Ron and Juliet, but own the stock.

They said they were running both merino and Romney sheep under ‘‘pretty extreme’’ conditions that could range from a metre of snow to very wet, or as dry as the typical Central Otago climate.

The property was running about 5700 merino ewes, 3800 Romney ewes, 3500 merino hoggets and 1800 Romney and halfbred hoggets, plus lambs, mixed-age rams and about 200 breeding cows. . .

Precision farming the new reality

Craige MacKenzie has seen a lot of technological change since 1978, when he started farming the property he grew up on near Methven.

“The changes haven’t just been in the tools we can use, but also in the industry-wide focus on precision farming, which is all about using IT to ensure crops and soil receive exactly what they need for optimum health and productivity. We’ve tried to take it to a new level.”

Craige and his wife Roz turned a traditional mixed cropping farm into a dairy farm and a specialised seed production operation in 1987.

He has won numerous awards for outstanding farming practice, including: . .

The 25 most innovative at-tech startups – Maggie McGrath and Chloe Sorvino:

When our nation was founded 241 years ago, farming was the economy’s primary driver. By 1870, nearly half of the employed population held jobs in agriculture. Today, it’s a $3 trillion industry – but only 2% of Americans hold a farm-oriented job.

This is, in many ways, thanks to technology. Tractors and other automation advances in the 20th century let large farms shift management to only a handful of people. But this, paradoxically, has also slowed things down in the 21st. With only a few people working every farm, there’s not a lot of time – or incentive – to innovate.

“You only get 40 attempts at farming. From your 20’s to your 60’s, you get 40 seasons,” says Duncan Logan, the founder and CEO of RocketSpace, a tech accelerator company. “In tech, you get 40 attempts in a week.” . . 

Fonterra Announces General Manager, Māori Strategy – Tiaki Hunia:

Fonterra today announced the appointment of Tiaki Hunia to the role of General Manager, Māori Strategy/Pouhere Māori.

As Pouhere Māori, Tiaki will play a vital role in continuing to progress our strategic Māori commitments and strengthen Fonterra’s bicultural capability. He will work across the business, to lead, build and implement our vision of a strong partnership with Māori, growing prosperous, healthy and sustainable communities together. . .

Tractor and machinery industry calls for larger fines for intentional biosecurity breaches:

The Tractor and Machinery Association (TAMA) is praising the Ministry of Primary Industry for finding a contaminated combine harvester imported from the UK but says fines must be a deterrent for intentional biosecurity breaches.

Last week Christchurch company Gateway Cargo Systems Ltd was fined $3,000 by the Ministry of Primary Industries after it declared a contaminated combine harvester imported from the United Kingdom was brand new. An inspection by MPI at the border found it had been used and was heavily contaminated with more than 700 litres of soil and farm waste in the header unit. MPI said it could have caused “incalculable damage” to New Zealand’s environment. . .

 


RSE workers leave union after 4 days

July 13, 2017

Union membership is low, so too is signing up people who don’t understand what they’re doing:

Attempts to sign up migrant vineyard workers in Marlborough to a union have hit a snag, with more than 100 workers joining then abruptly cancelling their membership.

The workers, in the region on the Recognised Seasonal Employer scheme, signed up to the Central Amalgamated Workers Union following a meeting last Thursday.

Union co-ordinator Steve McManus said the 118 workers – a figure disputed by the company involved, who claimed it was 111 – cancelled their membership just four days later.

McManus alleged the workers were pressured to leave the union, however the head of vineyard contracting company Hortus, Aaron Jay, has rubbished the claim.

Many thought they were signing up for insurance, and once they found out what the union was, how much it would cost and what it offered they became upset, Jay said.

The Hortus boss was told about the meeting, at the company’s accommodation facility Duncannon, on Friday by worker leaders concerned about what had taken place. . .

Jay said the workers had originally been happy to join, but once they understood exactly what was being offered they told him they felt ambushed, and upset.

“Unions definitely serve a purpose, I’ve got no problems with them as long as it’s done properly. A lot of the guys didn’t necessarily understand what they were signing up to,” he said.

“We pride ourselves on our morals, our values, who we are and what we do. I’m the sole owner and director of the business, so when they’re in New Zealand I’m responsible.

“We make sure they’re happy, and if that means becoming part of a union I’ve got no problems with that.” . . .

Jay is the RSE scheme representative for Marlborough, and his company, Hortus, has frequently been held up as an example of an employer following best practice guidelines.

The RSE scheme has just passed its 10th anniversary.

It’s been a success for employers who struggle to get staff during harvest and for the workers who earn good money to take back to their home countries.

There have been a few problems with a very few employers.

But this isn’t a case of a bad employer.

Nor of an anti-union employer.

This looks like a union taking advantage of people who didn’t understand what they were doing.

 


Quote of the day

July 13, 2017

Anything with your name should leave a lasting impression! – Marcia Brown who was born on this day in 1918.


July 13 in history

July 13, 2017

100 BC  Julius Caesar, Dictator of the Roman Republic, was born  (d. 44 BC).

1174   William I of Scotland, a key rebel in the Revolt of 1173–1174, was captured by forces loyal to Henry II.

1558 Battle of Gravelines: Spanish forces led by Count Lamoral of Egmont defeated the French forces of Marshal Paul des Thermes.

1573  Eighty Years’ War: The Siege of Haarlem ends after seven months.

1643  English Civil War: Battle of Roundway Down –  Henry Wilmot, 1st Earl of Rochester, commanding the Royalist forces, won a crushing victory over the Parliamentarian Sir William Waller.

1787  The Continental Congress enacted the Northwest Ordinanceestablishing governing rules for the Northwest Territory establishing  procedures for the admission of new states and limiting the expansion of slavery.

1794  Battle of the Vosges between French forces and those of Prussia and Austria.

1821 Nathan Bedford Forrest, American Confederate cavalry officer, and founder of the original Ku Klux Klan, was born  (d. 1877).

1830 The General Assembly’s Institution, now the Scottish Church College, was founded by Alexander Duff and Raja Ram Mohan Roy, in Calcutta.

1854  In the Battle of Guaymas, Mexico, General Jose Maria Yanezstopped the French invasion led by Count Gaston de Raousset Boulbon.

1863 – Margaret Murray, Anglo-Indian Egyptologist, archaeologist, anthropologist, historian, and folklorist, was born. (d. 1963).

1863 New York Draft Riots: Opponents of conscription began three days of rioting.

1878 Treaty of Berlin: The European powers redraw the map of the Balkans. Serbia, Montenegro and Romania became completely independent of the Ottoman empire.

1916 Vivian Walsh became the first New Zealander to obtain an aviator’s certificate, following the establishment in October 1915 of the New Zealand Flying School at Orakei.

Vivian Walsh obtains New Zealand’s first pilot’s certificate

1918 – Marcia Brown, American author and illustrator, was born (d. 2015).

1919 The British airship R34 landed in Norfolk, completing the first airship return journey across the Atlantic in 182 hours of flight.

1923  The Hollywood Sign was officially dedicated in the hills above Hollywood. It originally read “Hollywoodland ” but the four last letters were dropped after renovation in 1949.

1927  – Simone Veil, French lawyer and politician, 12th President of the European Parliament, was born.

1928 Bob Crane, American actor, was born  (d. 1978).

1941  World War II: Montenegrins started popular uprising against the Axis Powers (Trinaestojulski ustanak).

1942 – Harrison Ford, American Actor, was born.

1942 – Roger McGuinn, American musician (The Byrds), was born.

1950 – Rod Dixon, New Zealand runner, was born.

1950 Ma Ying-jeou, President  of China, former mayor of Taipei, former chairman of the Kuomintang (KMT), was born.

1960  Ian Hislop, British writer, editor of Private Eye, was born.

1973  Alexander Butterfield revealed the existence of the Nixon tapes to the special Senate committee investigating the Watergate break in.

1985  The Live Aid benefit concerts  in several places including London, Philadelphia, Sydney and Moscow.

1985 – United States Vice President George H.W. Bush became the Acting President for the day when President Ronald Reagan underwent surgery.

2003 – French DGSE personnel abort an operation to rescue Íngrid Betancourt from FARC rebels in Colombia, causing a political scandal when details are leaked to the press.

2011 – Mumbai was rocked by three bomb blasts during the evening rush hour, killing 26 and injuring 130.

2013 – Typhoon Soulik killed at least 9 people and affected more than 160 million in East China and Taiwan.

2014 – World Cup Final took place at the Maracanã in Rio de Janeiro.

2016 – Prime Minister of the United Kingdom David Cameron resigned, and was succeeded by Theresa May.

 

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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