Word of the day

June 7, 2017

Rhadamanthine – showing stern and inflexible judgement; strictly and uncompromisingly just; severely or inflexibly strict.


Rural round-up

June 7, 2017

Time to give farmers their due – Dr William Rolleston:

It is election year and it seems that for the environmental groups the gloves are off.

We have seen Greenpeace run a series of fundraising ads vilifying dairy farmers and Forest and Bird pull out of the Land and Water Forum. No surprise that both these organisations are headed by ex-Green politicians. Scuttlebutt is that Forest and Bird will re-join the Land and Water Forum after the election. Greenpeace has yet again been accused of misleading the public.

The truth is that farmers are fully engaged in meeting their environmental responsibilities. Up and down the country I have seen catchment groups working to reduce their impact on water quality and address issues of water allocation. . . 

Queen’s Birthday Honours: James Guild:

James Alastair Hay Guild, of High Peak Station, Darfield, has been made a Member of the New Zealand Order of Merit for services to the deer industry.

Mr Guild is a farmer and tourism operator who has been active in the deer industry for more than forty years.

Mr Guild has been a councillor and President of New Zealand Deer Farmers Association, Director of the Game Industry Board, Director of the Cervena Trust, inaugural Chair of Provelco Co-op Ltd, President of the New Zealand Association of Game Estates, and chaired the organising committee of first World Deer Congress. . .

People at the heart of decades of work for Flaxmere’s new MNZM:

Its third time lucky for the humble Peter MacGregor, who has been made a Member of the New Zealand Order of Merit for his services to Maori and agriculture.

The Flaxmere resident said he felt very honoured to have received the Queens Birthday Honour.

This was not the first time Mr MacGregor had been recognised in such a way – he said he had declined the Queens Birthday honours the first time “some years ago”, and the second time the required paperwork was not completed in time. . . 

Saving seed in case :

AgResearch has deposited a collection of seeds in a remote Arctic doomsday vault to guard against the loss of plant species through war, disease or disaster striking New Zealand.

The deposit was made via an airmailed package to the Svalbard Global Seed Vault, a secure facility on the rugged Arctic Svalbard archipelago between mainland Norway and the North Pole.

It is the second delivery of its kind from AgResearch’s Margot Forde Germplasm Centre (MFGC) following an agreement established last year. . .

Socks of many colours for resthome residents – Sally Brooker:

For its 40th anniversary, the Black and Coloured Sheep Breeders’ Association of New Zealand continued its tradition of charitable works.

The association held its annual conference in Oamaru, bringing in more than 50 delegates from across the country. As well as attending meetings and competing with their coloured fleeces, sheepskins, handcrafts and photography, they made time to donate woollen goods to a local rest-home. . . .

Fieldays’ Rural Bachelor competition is back:

Rest easy, New Zealand, the Fieldays Rural Bachelor of the Year finalists have been found.

Fieldays staff have been scouring New Zealand and Australia in search of the eight most eligible rural bachelors, and they have finally found this year’s stock. The blokes will soon be embarking on a whirlwind week as they vie for the title of Rural Bachelor of the Year, a prize pack worth over $20,000 and a chance at finding love.

Rural Bachelor event manager Lynn Robinson said selecting the finalists was a tough job. . .

 

 


GDT up .6%

June 7, 2017

The GlobalDairyTrade price index had its sixth successive increase, albeit a small one of only .6% in this morning’s auction.

The price of whole milk powder dropped 2.9%.

Other products: anhydrous milk fat down 1.2%; butter up 3.3%; butter milk powder up 5.8%; cheddar up 14.5%; lactose up 1%; rennet casein up 4.8% and skim milk powder up 7.9%.


No use imposing pain for no gain

June 7, 2017

Why isn’t farming included in the emissions trading scheme?

Climate Change Minister Paula Bennett nails the answer:

Let me take this opportunity to clearly state the Government’s position: until there is an economically viable way of reducing agricultural emissions through technological advances or otherwise, I will not be bringing agriculture into the Emissions Trading Scheme.

In a Parliamentary debate on the recent Globe New Zealand report into climate change, Labour’s David Parker said “If we are elected, agriculture will be coming into ETS very fast. We have always said it should”.
Here’s my response to Parker.
We fully support our farmers here in NZ.
There is absolutely no point in cutting them off at the knees because more inefficient farmers across the world would pick up the slack and leave us worse off overall.
The greenhouse gas footprint from dairy here is less than half the global average.
We are a nation of four million feeding 40m – the world needs what our farmers produce
.

Imposing the ETS on farming now would cause financial pain to farmers and the country.

If there was an environmental gain that cost might be justified but it can’t be when less efficient producers elsewhere would step in to the gap left by lower production in New Zealand.

We should be backing our NZ farmers.
The actions farmers are already taking to improve water quality and reduce nitrogen fertiliser costs have climate change co-benefits.
Farms that are improving efficiency and productivity are also reducing emissions intensity.
Over the past 25 years farmers have improved the emissions efficiency of production by about 1% a year.
Without these gains, agricultural emissions would have increased by 40% to produce the same amount of product, rather than the current 15% increase in emissions.
We need to make sure actions to achieve these efficiency gains become standard practice and that we strive for further improvements that have both on farm economic and climate benefits.
A thriving and productive agricultural sector is pivotal to the health of NZ’s economy and farmers are natural environmentalists.
We’ll be working in partnership with farmers, not against them, to make the changes we need to make to reach our ambitious Paris Agreement emissions reduction target.
We continue to put about $20m a year into agricultural greenhouse gas mitigation and adaptation research.
It includes improving our national forestry and agriculture greenhouse gas inventory and reporting, understanding and adapting to the impacts of climate change, research on reducing methane and nitrous oxide and how soil can be used to store carbon.
The Primary Growth Partnership and the Agricultural Greenhouse Gas Research Centre are examples of government industry partnerships to find new technologies and production systems that will make farming more productive and sustainable.
Fonterra has formed a 10-year, $20m partnership programme with the Department of Conservation to reduce predators and improve habitats and water quality.
This project looks at how sustainable dairying can be part of healthy, functioning ecosystems, highlighting the important two-way relationship between environmental health and economic prosperity.
NZ is working with other countries on many projects related to agriculture and recently signed an agreement with China to share technical expertise on carbon trading and agricultural greenhouse gas mitigation.
The Government continues to fund forestry schemes which provide additional income from marginal land, help improve water quality and act as a carbon sink.
We provide start-up support for community irrigation schemes which must meet regional environmental requirements.
NZ has a great opportunity to demonstrate that we have that integrity and to market ourselves as a really superb grower of premium food.
I have never met a farmer who didn’t want to leave the environment in a better state than they found it, for future generations.
We all need to work together to embed and accelerate good management practice and connect better with our consumers, both here and overseas.
A thriving and productive agricultural sector is pivotal to the health of NZ’s economy and farmers are natural environmentalists.

Quite.

Farmers might be a small minority in New Zealand now but farming still makes a large contribution to the economy.

Contrary to the anti-farming rhetoric most farmers are also doing everything they can to repair the environmental damage for poor practices in the past and ensure their current practices leave as small an environmental footprint as possible.


Quote of the day

June 7, 2017

Art hurts. Art urges voyages – and it is easier to stay at home. – Gwendolyn Brooks who was born on this day in 1917.

She also said:

When you use the term minority or minorities in reference to people, you’re telling them that they’re less than somebody else.


June 7 in history

June 7, 2017

1099 –  The First Crusade: The Siege of Jerusalem began.

1420 – Troops of the Republic of Venice captured Udine, ending the independence of the Patriarchate of Aquileia.

1494 –  Spain and Portugal signed the Treaty of Tordesillas which divided the New World between the two countries.

1628 – The Petition of Right, a major English constitutional document, became law when granted the Royal Assent by Charles I.

1654 –  Louis XIV was crowned King of France.

1692- Port Royal, Jamaica, was hit by a catastrophic earthquake; in just three minutes, 1,600 people were killed and 3,000 seriously injured.

1761 –  John Rennie, Scottish engineer, was born  (d. 1821).

1776 –  Richard Henry Lee presented the “Lee Resolution” to the Continental Congress; it was seconded by John Adams and led to the United States Declaration of Independence.

1778 –  Beau Brummell, English fashion leader, was born  (d. 1840).

1800  David Thompson reached the mouth of the Saskatchewan River in Manitoba.

1831 Amelia Edwards, English author and Egyptologist, was born  (d. 1892).

1832 Asian cholera reached Quebec brought by Irish immigrants, and killed about 6,000 people..

1862  The United States and Britain agreed to suppress the slave trade.

1863 During the French intervention in Mexico, Mexico City wais captured by French troops.

1866  1,800 Fenian raiders were repelled back to the United States after they looted and plundered around Saint-Armand and Frelighsburg, Quebec.

1868 Charles Rennie Mackintosh, Scottish architect, designer, and watercolourist, was born (d. 1928).

1880  War of the Pacific: The Battle of Arica, assault and capture of Morro de Arica (Arica Cape), that ended the Campaña del Desierto(Desert Campaign).

1893 Mohandas Gandhi committed his first act of civil disobedience.

1905  Norway’s parliament dissolved its union with Sweden.

1906  Cunard Line’s RMS Lusitania was launched at the John Brown Shipyard, Glasgow.

1909 Mary Pickford made her screen debut at the age of 16.

1917 Gwendolyn Brooks, American poet, was born (d. 2000).

1917 Dean Martin, American actor, was born (d. 1995).

1917  World War I: Battle of Messines –  the attack on Messines  began at 3.10 a.m. with the explosion of huge mines that had been placed under the German lines by tunnellers. Almost immediately, New Zealand troops of 2nd and 3rd (Rifle) brigades left their trenches and advanced towards the ridge in front of them, on which lay the ruins of Messines village. Australian and British troops on either side of them did the same.

The Battle of Messines

1919  Sette giugno: Riot in Malta, four people killed.

1921 Dorothy Ruth, American horse breeder; adopted daughter of Babe Ruth, was born (d. 1989).

1929 John Napier Turner, Canadian seventeenth Prime Minister of Canada, was born.

1931 Malcolm Morley, English painter, was born.

1936 The Steel Workers Organizing Committee, was founded in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Philip Murray was elected its first president.

1938 The Douglas DC-4E made its first test flight..

1940 – Fighter ace Edgar ‘Cobber’ Kain was killed.

1940 Tom Jones, Welsh singer, was born.

1940  King Haakon VII of Norway, Crown Prince Olav and the Norwegian government left Tromsø  and went into exile in London.

1942  World War II: The Battle of Midway ended.

1942 World War II: Japanese soldiers occupied the American islands ofAttu and Kiska, in the Aleutian Islands off Alaska.

1944 World War II: The steamer Danae carrying 350  Cretan Jews and 250 Cretan partisans, is sunk without survivors off the shore ofSantorini.

1944  World War II: Battle of Normandy – At Abbey Ardennes members of the SS Division Hitlerjugend massacred 23 Canadian prisoners of war.

1945  King Haakon VII of Norway returned with his family to Oslo after five years in exile.

1948  Edvard Beneš resigned as President of Czechoslovakia rather than signing a Constitution making his nation a Communist state.

1952 Liam Neeson, Northern Irish actor, was born.

1955  Lux Radio Theater signed off the air permanently.

1958 Prince, American musician, was born (d 2016).

1965  The Supreme Court of the United States decided on Griswold v. Connecticut, effectively legalizing the use of contraception by married couples.

1967  Israeli forces entered Jerusalem during the Six-Day War.

1971  The United States Supreme Court overturned the conviction of Paul Cohen for disturbing the peace, setting the precedent that vulgar writing is protected under the First Amendment.

1972 Karl Urban, New Zealand actor, was born.

1975  Sony introduced the Betamax videocassette recorder for sale to the public.

1976  MacDonalds opened for the first time in New Zealand at Cobham Court, Porirua.

McDonald's arrives in NZ

1977 – 500 million people watched on television as the high day ofJubilee got underway for Queen Elizabeth II.

1981 The Israeli Air Force destroyed Iraq’s Osiraq nuclear reactor duringOperation Opera

1982 –  Priscilla Presley opened Graceland to the public

1989  A Surinam Airways DC-8 Super 62 crashed near Paramaribo Airport  Suriname  killing 168.

1991 Mount Pinatubo exploded generating an ash column 7 km (4.5 miles) high.

1993  The Holbeck Hall Hotel in Scarborough, UK, fell into the sea following a landslide.

1995  The long range Boeing 777 entered service with United Airlines.

1998  James Byrd, Jr. was dragged to death in a racially-motivated crime.

2000 – The United Nations defined the Blue Line as the border between Israel and Lebanon.

2006 – Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, the leader of Al-Qaeda in Iraq, was killed in an airstrike by the United States Air Force.

2013 – A bus caught fire in the Chinese city of Xiamen, killing at least 47 people and injuring more than 34 others.

2013 – A gunman opened fire at Santa Monica College in Santa Monica, California, after setting a house on fire nearby, killing six people, including the suspect.

2014 – At least 37 people are killed in an attack in the Democratic Republic of the Congo’s South Kivu province.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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