Word of the day

April 26, 2017

Bema – the altar part or sanctuary in ancient and Orthodox churches; the enclosed space surrounding the altar; the sanctuary or chancel;  an open space between the end of the nave arcade and the apse ion a basilica; the podium or platform in a synagogue from which the Torah and Prophets are read; the platform from which orators spoke in ancient Athens.


Rural round-up

April 26, 2017

 Farmers feel dairying presented unjustly in TV programme – Joyce Wyllie:

None of us chose where we were born or which family we were delivered into. I’m very blessed with wonderful parents and reared on a farm up a valley north of Gisborne. My happy, stimulating childhood was varied and colourful except for learning about right and wrong, that was back and white. Our home had no TV, but plenty of books, routines, chores, homework, good habits and a healthy sense of fairness.

Mum and Dad were both people of high integrity who valued honesty and justice and taught us to treat our neighbours as we would like to be treated. Those solid standards were set for us to live up to and I hope to pass them on to the next generation for our children’s benefit. Consequently I am conscious of fairness and won’t be the only one who has noticed with increasing alarm the put downs, insults and the unjust tactics we witness on TV screens every day.

It’s meant to pass as entertainment, or debate, or news, and occasionally as documentary. Recently the programme, The Price of Milk, was heavily promoted proudly touting to be giving the farmers’ side of the story. . .

Thirst for high-end ‘craft milk’ drives Nelson dairy farmer upmarket – Julie Iles:

A Nelson dairy farmer is jump-starting a craft milk industry.

Seventh-generation dairy farmer Julian Raine’s family has been dairy farming for more than 80 years.

The family is now on a mission to bring back “how milk used to be” to the mainstream market.

“We are not highly industrialised, we are kind of the equivalent of craft beer in the dairy industry.” . . 

Beef and lamb help correct iron deficiency – Rod Slater:

Calling on all farmers, it’s your time to wave your flag proudly in a bid to support raising iron levels across our country.

As we know, beef and lamb is one of the most iron rich foods in our diet and next month marks World Iron Awareness Week running from May 1 – 7. Like everything we do in our offices, World Iron Awareness Week is something we are very passionate about – it’s hard not to be when you hear some of the facts around iron deficiency in New Zealand.

– low iron levels are evident in one in 14 adult women over the age of 15 years.

– 8 out of 10 toddlers don’t meet the recommended daily intake of dietary iron.

– 14 per cent of children under the age of 2 are iron deficient.

– 40 per cent of New Zealand women don’t get enough iron in their diet, and many go on to experience iron deficiency. . .

Zespri forecasts record profit from Gold3 licence revenue – Tina Morrison

(BusinessDesk) – Zespri International, the country’s kiwifruit export marketing body, expects to post a record profit this year due to increased revenue from the allocation of licences to grow the Gold3 variety.

The Mount Maunganui-based company forecast net profit of between $98 million and $103 million in the year ending March 31, 2018, it said in a letter to growers and shareholders. That’s ahead of its expectation for the 12 months ended March 31 this year of between $71 million and $74 million, and up from a profit of $35.8 million in 2016. . . 

Federated Farmers: Gypsum can reduce agricultural emissions:

Agricultural systems are leaky and losses of phosphorus, nitrogen, organic matter and suspended solids can impact on water quality.

While direct contamination of surface water can be prevented by avoiding livestock access and effluent discharge, it is less straightforward to prevent losses over and through soil that can eventually reach waterways.

These less direct losses are affected by complex hydrological and chemical factors.
Gypsum has long been used as a soil conditioner and fertiliser but it is only recently that gypsum’s potential for reducing agricultural emissions to waterways has been researched.
. .

Hogan warns of UK-US ‘bloodbath’ in future agri-trade talks – Philip Clarke:

EU agriculture commissioner Phil Hogan is predicting a “bloodbath” over the terms of any future UK-US free-trade agreement after Brexit.

Addressing an event organised by the Irish Farmers Association (IFA) in County Kildare, Mr Hogan said the UK had made it clear it intends to pursue its own international trade agenda once it leaves the European Union.

See also: Countryside Alliance demands ‘pragmatic’ trade deals

However, he said “fault lines” were already emerging with respect to any UK-US trade agreement. . .


Quote of the day

April 26, 2017

None of us is guaranteed against failure or corruption of any kind; witness what’s going on in the world in this moment, the follies of human nature and the failures of human nature.Morris West who was born on this day in 1916.

He also said:

If you spend your whole life waiting for the storm, you’ll never enjoy the sunshine.


April 26 in history

April 26, 2017

570 Muhammed, founder of Islam, was born according to the Shi’a sect. Other sources suggest April 20; (d. 632) .

1336 Francesco Petrarca (Petrarch) ascended  Mont Ventoux.

1478 The Pazzi attacked Lorenzo de’ Medici and killed his brother Giuliano during High Mass in the Duomo of Florence.

1607  English colonists of the Jamestown settlement made landfall at Cape Henry, Virginia.

1802 Napoleon Bonaparte signed a general amnesty to allow all but about 1,000 of the most notorious émigrés of the French Revolution to return to France, as part of a reconciliary gesture with the factions of the Ancien Regime and to eventually consolidate his own rule.

1805 United States Marines captured Derne, Tripoli, under the command of First Lieutenant Presley O’Bannon.

1856 Sir Joseph Ward, 17th Prime Minister of New Zealand  was born  (d. 1930), .

1865  American Civil War: Confederate General Joseph E. Johnstonsurrendered his army to General William Tecumseh Sherman at the Bennett Place near Durham, North Carolina.

1865 Union cavalry troopers cornered and shot dead John Wilkes Booth, assassin of President Lincoln.

1879 Owen Willans Richardson, British physicist, Nobel laureate, was born (d. 1959).

1888 Anita Loos, American writer was born, (d. 1981).

1889 Ludwig Wittgenstein, Austrian-born philosopher, was born (d. 1951).

1894 Rudolf Hess, Nazi official was born (d. 1987).

1900 Charles Richter, American geophysicist was born (d. 1985).

1916 Morris West, Australian writer was born  (d. 1999).

1925  Paul von Hindenburg defeated Wilhelm Marx in the second round of the German presidential election to become the first directly elected head of state of the Weimar Republic.

1933 Carol Burnett, American comedian, was born.

1933 The Gestapo, the official secret police force of Nazi Germany, was established.

1937  Spanish Civil War: Guernica, was bombed by German Luftwaffe.

1943 The Union Steam Ship Company freighter Limerick was torpedoed in the Tasman.

NZ ship torpedoed in Tasman

1945 World War II: Battle of Bautzen – last successful German tank-offensive of the war and last noteworthy victory of the Wehrmacht.

1945 – Author John Mulgan died.

Death of John Mulgan

1946 Father Divine, a controversial religious leader who claimed to be God, married the much-younger Edna Rose Ritchings, a celebrated anniversary in the International Peace Mission movement.

1954 The Geneva Conference, an effort to restore peace in Indochina and Korea, began.

1956 First container ship left Port Newark,  for Houston.

1956 Koo Stark, American actress, was born.

1960 Roger Taylor, English musician (Duran Duran), was born.

1962 NASA’s Ranger 4 spacecraft crashed into the Moon.

1963 Amendments to the constitution transformed Libya into one national unity and allowed for female participation in elections.

1964 Tanganyika and Zanzibar merged to form Tanzania.

1965 A Rolling Stones concert in London, Ontario was shut down by police after 15 minutes due to rioting.

1966  An earthquake of magnitude 7.5 destroyed Tashkent.

1966  A new government was formed in the Republic of Congo, led byAmbroise Noumazalaye.

1970 The Convention Establishing the World Intellectual Property Organization entered into force

1982 57 people were killed by former police officer Woo Bum-kon in a shooting spree in Gyeongsangnam-do, South Korea.

1982 Jon Lee, British singer (S Club), was born.

1986 A nuclear reactor accident occurred at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant.

1991 Seventy tornadoes broke out in the central United States.

1994 – A China Airlines Airbus A300-600R crashed at Nagoya Airport, Japan killing all but seven passengers, with a death toll amounting to 264. See also China Airlines flight 140.

1994  Physicists announced first evidence of the top quark subatomic particle.

2002 Robert Steinhäuser infiltrated and kills 17 at Gutenberg-Gymnasium in Erfurt, Germany before dying of a self-inflicted gunshot.

2005 – Under international pressure, Syria withdrew the last of its 14,000 troop military garrison in Lebanon, ending its 29-year military domination of that country.

2005 Civil unions came into effect in New Zealand.
Civil unions come into effect
Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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