Word of the day

January 9, 2017

Peregrinate – travel or  or journey, especially to walk on foot; wander from place to place;  traverse.


Rural round-up

January 9, 2017

Hold trade partners to account – Nigel Stirling:

They are expensive and have been used only sparingly in New Zealand’s history.

But one of the country’s top trade lawyers, Tracey Epps, says the Government shouldn’t shy away from taking cases against protectionist trading partners to the World Trade Organisation.

She tells Nigel Stirling why.

It amounted to a billion-dollar Christmas present for the country’s beef farmers. . . 

New plan ready to go – Alan Williams:

Farmers want Beef + Lamb NZ to step up its market development work and chairman James Parsons says a start is under way.

The new plan would involve more development work in key, mature markets alongside the export companies, Parsons said.

Promotions would be made only if companies were prepared to follow through with products and had already helped to develop the strategy. . . 

Reforming our regional economy – Chris Perley:

Why do we manage land the way we do? Why does New Zealand focus on ever-more gross production over a great scale of sameness?

Why do we talk of “feeding the world” when we can at best feed 40 million or so? Why do some defend the consequences of pollution of streams?

Why do we think we can keep on farming the way that we do, and then add some token riparian fences as some panacea solution – which it patently is not?

Enough with all the mechanical in-the-box thinking. It is leading us in a vicious treadmill downwards. . . 

High tech solution to invasive mammal pests – James Russell:

This year the Biological Heritage National Science Challenge in New Zealand launches its project on high tech solutions to invasive mammal pests, hosted by the University of Auckland. The high tech solutions project aims to deliver the long-term science solutions which will become a part of Predator Free New Zealand. In July 2016 the New Zealand government officially adopted Predator Free New Zealand and in December appointed the PFNZ2050 board of directors and announced its commitment to the Honolulu Challenge. In 2017 the high tech solutions project will commence researching the science which will eventually be needed to achieve the 2050 target. . . 

New Year honours for dairy, beef and wine leaders – Gerard Hutching:

Former National Cabinet minister John Luxton has been honoured with a Companion of the Order of New Zealand (CNZM) for his services to the dairy industry.

“This award is a recognition of the importance of the dairy industry, which is very innovative and responsible for earning nearly half New Zealand’s primary sector exports,” he said.

A National Party MP from 1987 to 2002, Luxton held numerous Cabinet portfolios including Agriculture, Housing and Commerce.

He oversaw the development of industry-good body DairyNZ, stepping down as chairman of the board last year, having held the position since 2008. . . 

Farm-turned-amusement park provides ‘good, wholesome, old fashioned fun‘ – David Burroughs:

If you’ve ever wanted to ride a cow, or get towed behind a tractor, or ride a bike like ET, you need to visit Fernbrooke Farm Amusement Park.

Sitting near the base of Mt Taranaki, the park is the brainchild of Stratford farmer Dave Hunger, who for the last five years has spent his spare time creating weird and wonderful machines and toys.

Hunger started bringing visitors on to his farm five years ago after making a trebuchet, similar to a catapult, out of a 13 metre long tree. . . 

Image may contain: one or more people, outdoor, text and nature

I work out (side).


Perspective

January 9, 2017

Image may contain: text and outdoor

Getting behind slow moving farm equipment for two miles in the country is the equivalent to waiting for two traffic lights in the city.

You’ll survive.

Stay back, enjoy the views and share the roads this summer time.


Quote of the day

January 9, 2017

To the wrongs that need resistance, To the right that needs assistance, To the future in the distance, Give yourselves. – Carrie Chapman Catt  who was born on this day in 1859.

She also said:

No written law has ever been more binding than unwritten custom supported by popular opinion.

And:

There are whole precincts of voters in this country whose united intelligence does not equal that of one representative American woman.


January 9 in history

January 9, 2017

475 – Byzantine Emperor Zeno wasforced to flee his capital at Constantinople, and his general, Basiliscus gained control of the empire.

681 – Twelfth Council of Toledo: King Erwig of the Visigoths initiated a council in which he implements diverse measures against the Jews in Spain.

1127  – Invading Jurchen soldiers from the Jin Dynasty besieged and sacked Bianjing (Kaifeng), the capital of the Song Dynasty of China, and abduct Emperor Qinzong and others, ending the Northern Song Dynasty.

1150 – Prince Hailing of Jin and other court officials murdered Emperor Xizong of Jin. Hailing succeeds him as emperor.

1349 The Jewish population of Basel, Switzerland, believed by the residents to be the cause of the ongoing Black Death, was rounded up and incinerated.

1431 Judges’ investigations for the trial of Joan of Arc began in Rouen, France, the seat of the English occupation government.

1768  Philip Astley staged the first modern circus in London.

1773 – Cassandra Austen, English watercolorist and sister of Jane Austen, was born (d. 1845).

1793  Jean-Pierre Blanchard became the first person to fly in a balloon in the United States.

1799 British Prime Minister William Pitt introduced income tax to raise funds for the war against Napoleon.

1806 – Admiral Horatio Lord Nelson received a state funeral and was interred in St Paul’s Cathedral.

1816 Sir Humphry Davy tested the Davy lamp for miners at Hebburn Colliery.

1822  Portuguese prince Pedro I of Brazil decided to stay in Brazil against the orders of the Portuguese king João VI, starting the Brazilian independence process.

1839 The French Academy of Sciences announced the Daguerreotypephotography process.

1854 Jennie Jerome, American society beauty and mother of Winston Churchill, was born (d. 1921).

1859 Carrie Chapman Catt, American suffragist leader, was born  (d. 1947).

1861  The “Star of the West” incident near Charleston, South Carolina – considered by some historians to be the “First Shots of the American Civil War”.

1878  Umberto I became King of Italy.

1880 – The Great Gale of 1880 devastated parts of Oregon and Washington with high wind and heavy snow.

1894 New England Telephone and Telegraph installed the first battery-operated telephone switchboard in Lexington, Massachusetts.

1896 Warwick Braithwaite, New Zealand-born British conductor, was born (d. 1971).

1898  Gracie Fields, English music hall performer, was born  (d. 1979).

1902 Saint Josemaría Escrivá, Spanish Catholic priest and founder of Opus Dei, was born (d. 1975) .

1903  Hallam Tennyson, 2nd Baron Tennyson, son of the poet Alfred Tennyson, became the second Governor-General of Australia.

1905 According to the Julian Calendar which was used at the time, Russian workers staged a march on the Winter Palace that ended in the massacre by Tsarist troops known as Bloody Sunday, setting off the Russian Revolution of 1905.

1908  Simone de Beauvoir, French author, was born (d. 1986).

1911 – Gypsy Rose Lee, American burlesque entertainer, dancer, actress, and author (d. 1970)

1913  Richard Nixon, 37th President of the United States, was born  (d. 1994).

1916  The Battle of Gallipoli concluded with an Ottoman Empire victory when the last Allied forces were evacuated from the peninsula.

1916 Peter Twinn, English World War II code-breaker, was born (d. 2004) .

1918 Battle of Bear Valley: The last battle of the American Indian Wars.

1920 Clive Dunn, British actor, was born (d. 2012).

1923 Katherine Mansfield died.
Death of Katherine Mansfield

1928  Judith Krantz, American author, was born.

1933 Wilbur Smith, Zambian-British novelist, was born.

1939 Susannah York, British actress, was born.

1941 Joan Baez, American singer and activist, was born.

1942 Lee Kun-hee, Korean industrialist, chairman of Samsung, was born.

1944 –  Jimmy Page, British musician and producer (Led Zeppelin), was born.

1948 – Bill Cowsill, American singer (The Cowsills), was born (d. 2006).

1951 –  Crystal Gayle, American singer, was born.

1951 – The United Nations headquarters officially opened in New York City.

1953 –  Morris Gleitzman, British-Australian children’s author, was born.

1978 – AJ McLean, American singer (Backstreet Boys), was born.

1980 – Sergio Garcia, Spanish golfer, was born.

2005  Rawhi Fattouh succeeded  Yasser Arafat as head of the Palestine Liberation Organization .

2007  – Apple CEO Steve Jobs unveiled the first iPhone.

2011 – Iran Air Flight 277 crashed near Orumiyeh in the northeast of the country, killing 77 people.

2013 – A SeaStreak ferry travelling to lower Manhattan, New York City, crashed into the dock, injuring 85 people.

2014  – An explosion at a Mitsubishi Materials chemical plant inYokkaichi, Japan, kills at least five people and injures 17 others.

2015 – The perpetrators of the Charlie Hebdo shooting in Paris two days earlier were both killed after a hostage situation. Elsewhere, a second hostage situation, related to the Charlie Hebdo shooting, occurred at a Jewish market,Hypercacher, in the eastern Paris suburb of Vincennes.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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