366 days of gratitude

October 10, 2016

Some people have bad hair days, I tend more towards a bad hair life.

It used to be curly. When I was a student and Barbara Streisand was starring in A Star Is Born with an afro that was fashionable. While friends were spending four or more times the week’s rent on getting their hair permed I could get the same look by shaking my head after a shower.

But with each pregnancy my hair got straighter though not completely straight and it’s now on the untidy part of the range in between smoothly groomed and artfully disheveled except every six to eight weeks when a professional cuts and dries it.

Today was one of those days so my hair is looking as if someone cares for it. That’s a temporary state which will last only until I wash it tomorrow, but I’m none the less grateful for it.


Word of the day

October 10, 2016

Shermanesque – having the intent of refusing a nomination to public office, or of refusing to serve in such office if elected; unequivocal, especially in refusing to run for an office; brutally thorough, especially in defeating someone.


Rural round-up

October 10, 2016

Alliance appoints Stacy to new role :

Alliance Group has appointed Heather Stacy to the newly created role of general manager livestock and shareholder services.

Ms Stacy, who starts work on November 21, has held senior leadership roles,  including as general manager of international farming with Fonterra New Zealand, and  general manager milk supply with Fonterra Australia.

She was previously the executive director of United Dairy Farmers (the dairy sector’s equivalent of Federated Farmers) and has worked in the red meat industry for Meat and Livestock Australia (Australia’s equivalent of Beef and Lamb NZ). . . 

Off to Oz to contest Wayleggo Cup:

Taieri dog trialling enthusiast Graham White, pictured above with his dogs Moss and Ladd, is off to Australia for the annual Transtasman dog trial test.

Mr White, who is president of the New Zealand Sheep Dog Trial Association, is team manager and also the New Zealand judge. . .

Contracting firm changing hands – Sally Rae:

Geoff Scurr and Blair Skevington have a few things in common.

Not only do they live in East Otago, but they showed entrepreneurial streaks from a young age, and shared a passion for the contracting industry.

Mr Scurr was just 16 when he bought his first bulldozer, an International BTD6, for $1800 — a substantial sum for a teenager.

Two years later, he bought a contracting business in Waikouaiti.

Mr Skevington bought the then-closed North Western Hotel in Palmerston when he was 19.

Being underage, he had to find a business partner with a bar manager’s licence to help him reopen it. . . 

Farm systems ‘status quo’ despite forecast milk price:

Dairy farmers Rachel and Kenneth Short say despite a potential increase in forecast milk price, they won’t be making any changes to their farm budget.

The couple are equity partners with Louis and Barbara Kuriger on a 440 cow, 168ha Taranaki farm run under a very simple, low input system which operates year-in, year-out with farm working expenses (FWE) of $1.90-$2.20/kg MS. Production for 2016/17 is expected to be 140,000kg MS.

“We’ve run the same financial budget since 2010. We never make changes to the budget – even at a high payout, our farm working expenses are identical to what they are this year,” says Rachel. . . 

While most African farms are organic @OxfamNZ @GreenpeaceNZ @SteffanBrowning – Utopia:

Image may contain: text and food

Africa’s urgent need for agricultural modernization is being rudely ignored. When elite urbanites in rich countries began turning away from science-based farming in the 1980s, external assistance for agriculture in poor countries was cut sharply. As late as 1980 the U.S. Agency for International Development was still devoting 25 percent of its official development assistance to the modernization of farming, but today it is just 1 percent. . . 

Farmers warned not to plant left-over contaminated fodder beet seed:

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) is cautioning farmers not to plant left-over seed from any of the six lines of fodder beet seed imported last year and known to be contaminated with velvetleaf.

MPI is working with industry players and regional councils to manage the incursion of the pest weed resulting from the importation of the contaminated seed.

Response Incident Controller David Yard says there are hundreds of properties around New Zealand that have velvetleaf on them and we don’t want any more. . . 

Forest Enterprises now licensed:

One of New Zealand’s leading forest investment and management companies has been licensed.

On 3 October, Forest Enterprises Limited was licensed under the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 to manage Managed Investment Schemes (excluding managed funds) which are primarily invested in forestry assets.

Managing Director Steve Wilton describes the licence as a “milestone” for the company.

He says Forest Enterprises was, on 5 October, one of just two forestry investment specialists that had been licensed out of a total of 51 licensed MIS managers. Most of the others are managers of managed funds. . . 

#GMO the most regulated & tested product in agricultural history:

image

(Click the link on the headline above for more)


Opposition down one, can National make that permanent?

October 10, 2016

When Phil Goff resigns from parliament the Opposition will be one vote down, putting National back in the position it was immediately after the election and before it lost Northland when New Zealand First gained another MP.

National list MP Parmjeet Parmar is expected to win the party’s selection for a candidate to contest the by-election.

If she were to win the seat National would gain another list MP which would make it easier than it is at present to get legislation passed.

How likely is that?

National won the party vote in the seat in the last election and Labour’s candidate Michael Woods won’t have anywhere near the name-recognition that Goff had.

But a government has never won a seat from the opposition in a by-election.

The Green Party’s decision to not stand a candidate will help Labour and the waters will be muddied by the candidacy of  newly formed People’s Party leader Roshan Nauhria to contest the election.

History shows new parties rarely attract much support. The question is: will any support Nauhria does attract will split the opposition vote or be at National’s expense?

Labour has the most to lose. Failing to hold the seat wouldn’t only leave the Opposition one seat down, it would be a huge blow to its fight to continue looking like a major party with any chance of leading a future government.

National has less to lose and a lot to gain.

History is against it, but a strong candidate and a campaign to match make a win possible although it’s too soon to say if that’s probable.

 


Quote of the day

October 10, 2016

The past is what you remember, imagine you remember, convince yourself you remember, or pretend you remember.  – Harold Pinter who celebrates his 86th birthday today.

He also said:

There are no hard distinctions between what is real and what is unreal, nor between what is true and what is false. A thing is not necessarily either true or false; it can be both true and false.

And:

One way of looking at speech is to say it is a constant stratagem to cover nakedness.

And:

It’s so easy for propaganda to work, and dissent to be mocked.

 


October 10 in history

October 10, 2016

680  Battle of Karbala: Hussain bin Ali, the grandson of the Prophet Muhammad, was decapitated by forces under Caliph Yazid I.

732  Battle of Tours: The leader of the Franks, Charles Martel and his men, defeated a large army of Moors, stopping the Muslims from spreading into Western Europe. The governor of Cordoba, Abdul Rahman Al Ghafiqi, was killed during the battle.

1471  Battle of Brunkeberg: Sten Sture the Elder, the Regent of Sweden, with the help of farmers and miners, repelled an attack by Christian I, King of Denmark.

1575 Battle of Dormans: Roman Catholic forces under Duke Henry of Guise defeat the Protestants, capturing Philippe de Mornay among others.

1580  After a three-day siege, the English Army beheaded over 600 Irish and Papal soldiers and civilians at Dún an Óir, Ireland.

1780 The Great Hurricane of 1780 killed 20,000-30,000 in the Caribbean.

1813 Giuseppe Verdi, Italian composer, was born (d. 1901).

1830 Queen Isabella II, of Spain, was born (d. 1904).

1845  In Annapolis, Maryland, the Naval School (later renamed theUnited States Naval Academy) opened with 50 midshipmen students and seven professors.

1868  Carlos Céspedes issued the Grito de Yara from his plantation, La Demajagua, proclaiming Cuba’s independence.

1877 – William Morris, 1st Viscount Nuffield, English businessman and philanthropist, founded Morris Motors, was born (d. 1963).

1900 Helen Hayes, American actress, was born (d. 1993).

1911  The Wuchang Uprising led to the demise of Qing Dynasty, the last Imperial court in China, and the founding of the Republic of China.

1911  The KCR East Rail commenced service between Kowloon andCanton.

1913  President Woodrow Wilson triggered the explosion of the Gamboa Dike, ending construction on the Panama Canal.

1920 The Carinthian Plebiscite determined that the larger part of Carinthia should remain part of Austria.

1923 Nicholas Parsons, English actor, was born.

1930 Harold Pinter, English playwright, Nobel laureate, was born (d. 2008)

1933  United Airlines Chesterton Crash: A United Airlines Boeing 247 was destroyed by sabotage

1935 A coup d’état by the royalist leadership of the Greek Armed Forces tak overthrew the government of Panagis Tsaldaris and established a regency under Georgios Kondylis, effectively ending the Second Hellenic Republic.

1938 The Munich Agreement ceded the Sudetenland to Nazi Germany.

1943  Double Tenth Incident in Japanese controlled Singapore.

1944 Holocaust: 800 Gypsy children were murdered at Auschwitz concentration camp.

1945  The Chinese Communist Party and the Kuomintang signed a principle agreement in Chongqing about the future of post-war China – the Double-Ten Agreement.

1950 Nora Roberts, American novelist, was born.

1957  U.S. President Dwight D. Eisenhower apologised to the finance minister of Ghana, Komla Agbeli Gbdemah, after he was refused service in a Dover, Delaware restaurant.

1957 – The Windscale fire in Cumbria –  the world’s first major nuclear accident.

1963  France ceded control of the Bizerte naval base to Tunisia.

1964  The opening ceremony at The 1964 Summer Olympics in Tokyo, was broadcast live in the first Olympic telecast relayed by geostationary communication satellite.

1967 The Outer Space Treaty, signed on January 27 by more than sixty nations, comes into force.

1970  Fiji became independent.

1970 – In Montreal, Vice-Premier and Minister of Labour Pierre Laporte became the second statesman kidnapped by members of the FLQ terrorist group.

1971 London Bridge reopened in Lake Havasu City, Arizona.

1973  Vice President of the United States Spiro Agnew resigned after being charged with federal income tax evasion.

1975 The government created the Waitangi Tribunal to hear Maori claims of breaches of the Treaty of Waitangi by successive New Zealand governments.

Waitangi Tribunal created

1978 – Caroline Meyer and Georgina Earl, (nee Evers-Swindell), Olympic gold medal rowers were born.

1985  United States Navy F-14 fighter jets intercepted an Egyptian plane carrying the Achille Lauro cruise ship hijackers and forced it to land at a NATO base in Sigonella, Sicily.

1986 An earthquake measuring 7.5 on the Richter Scale in San Salvador killed an estimated 1,500 people.

1997  An Austral Airlines DC-9-32 crashed and exploded near Nuevo Berlin, Uruguay, killing 74.

1998  A Lignes Aériennes Congolaises Boeing 727 was shot down by rebels in Kindu, Democratic Republic of the Congo, killing 41 people.

2006  The Greek city of Volos flooded in one of the prefecture’s worst recorded floods.

2008 The 10 October 2008 Orakzai bombing killed 110 and injured 200 more.

2009  Armenia and Turkey signed protocols in Zurich, Switzerland to open their borders which had been closed for about 200 years.

2010 – The Netherlands Antilles were dissolved.

2010 – Cable channel The Hub made its debut in the United States.

2015 – Twin bomb blasts in the Turkish capital Ankara near the main train station killed at least 102 people and wounded more than 400.

Sourced from NZ history Online & Wikipedia


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