366 days of gratitude

October 5, 2016

In early spring winter vegetables are beginning to get a bit tired and we begin looking forward to the new season’s produce.

My farmer came home from the supermarket with some today – asparagus.

I brushed it lightly with oil, seasoned it with a very little salt and baked it until it was el dente – firm to the bite.

As spring progresses I’ll make posh cheese rolls with grated Whitestone Windsor Blue cheese and asparagus; add the vegetable to roulades; serve it with pre-dinner nibbles, throw it on the barbeque . . .

Asparagus is my favourite spring vegetable and I’m grateful for it.


Word of the day

October 5, 2016

Waywiser – an instrument (specifically an odometer or pedometer) for measuring the distance traversed by a walker, vehicle, or ship.


Rural round-up

October 5, 2016

The rise of China’s agriculture – Keith Woodford:

Although it leaves many New Zealanders uncomfortable, there is a stark reality that the future of New Zealand’s agricultural industries, and hence the overall economy, is highly dependent on China. The reason is very simple: there is no-one else in the world who needs and wants our agricultural products at the levels we produce those products.

If action were driven by logic, then we would spend a lot of effort in trying to understand China.   We would want to understand Chinese consumers, we would want to understand Chinese government policy towards agriculture, and we would want to understand what is happening on the ground in rural China.

We do know something about all of these things, but we don’t know enough.  In particular, we know very little about what is happening within Chinese agriculture itself.

New meat strategy positive – MIA:

 Beef+Lamb NZ’s new red meat marketing strategy results from a step-up in collaboration by the wider red meat sector, says Meat Industry Association chief executive Tim Ritchie.

And the new approach is not without valuable precedent. The refocused strategy, with BLNZ directing promotional efforts to new markets, is similar to decades ago when North American and Japanese markets were targeted after Britain joined the European Union (then known as the Common Market), Ritchie says. . . 

Dairy-specific science facility secured for Southland:

A new dairy research and demonstration farm being developed in Southland will ensure the local dairy sector continually has access to the latest science and innovation, Science and Innovation Minister Steven Joyce says.

The Southern Dairy Hub is being funded by AgResearch, DairyNZ and the Southern Dairy Development Trust, which represents the region’s dairy farmers.

The investment recognises the scale and importance of dairying in the Southern region and aims to address the unique significant localised issues faced by Southland dairy farmers. . . 

Wilson urges farmers to back changes:

One week out from an important vote for New Zealand’s biggest company, Fonterra Chairman John Wilson is urging farmers to back changes to the cooperative’s governance and representation.

This would mean Fonterra can stay focussed on making the most from farmers’ milk and growing farmers’ wealth, he says.  

“Over the past eight months there has been a lot of good discussion on the unique governance structure of the cooperative,” Wilson says. . . 

Access to food essential to better urban planning:

Access to staples of the New Zealand food basket, such as carrots, potatoes, onions and leafy greens, must be a consideration on the table in urban planning, says Horticulture New Zealand Chief Executive Mike Chapman.

Horticulture New Zealand has made a submission on the Productivity Commission’s draft report Better Urban Planning.

The draft report suggests different ways of delivering urban planning in New Zealand to meet changing demands. . . 

International butchery at its best – Rod Slater:

 I headed over to Australia last month with our national butchery team, The Pure South Sharp Blacks, and four of our most talented young butchers. Our mission: To compete in the World Butchers’ Challenge – a three hour cutting test match between four nations; Australia, France, the UK and New Zealand.

The curtainraiser was an incredible showdown between an international group of young butchers and butcher apprentices.

The event unfolded with a week touring the best butcher shops in both Sydney and the Gold Coast and as always upon visiting Australia, our delegation was truly impressed by what was on offer. . . 

Image may contain: cloud, sky and outdoor

Farm girl to do list: wake up, kick butt, repeat.

 


GDT down 3%

October 5, 2016

The GlobalDairyTrade price index dropped 3% in this morning’s auction after five successive increases.

gdt5-10-16

gdt510-16

gdt5-10-16


Quote of the day

October 5, 2016

You can’t just carry everyone else’s hopes and fears around in your backpack and expect to stand up straight.David Kirk *  who celebrates his 56th birthday today.

* The biography on the Brainy Quote page where I found this is that of the former All Black captain but the other quotes don’t sound like him so these words might have been said by another David Kirk.


October 5 in history

October 5, 2016

869  The Fourth Council of Constantinople was convened to decide about what to do about Patriarch Photius of Constantinople.

1143  King Alfonso VII of Leon recognised Portugal as a Kingdom.

1665 The University of Kiel was founded.

1789 French Revolution: Women of Paris marched to Versailles to confront Louis XVI about his refusal to promulgate the decrees on the abolition of feudalism, demand bread, and have the King and his court moved to Paris.

1793 French Revolution: Christianity was disestablished in France.

1858 – Helen Churchill Candee, American journalist and author, was born (d. 1949).

1864 Louis Lumière, French film pioneer, was born (d. 1948).

1864 Calcutta was almost totally destroyed by a cyclone which killed  60,000 people.

1866 The Maungatapu murderers were hanged in Nelson.

Maungatapu murderers hanged in Nelson

1869  A strong hurricane devastated the Bay of Fundy in Canada.

1877 Chief Joseph surrendered his Nez Perce band to General Nelson A. Miles.

1885  – Ida Rubinstein, Russian ballerina and actress, was born (d. 1960).

1895 The first individual time trial for racing cyclists was held on a 50-mile course north of London.

1903  Sir Samuel Griffith was appointed the first Chief Justice of Australia and Sir Edmund Barton and Richard O’Connor were appointed foundation justices.

1905 Wilbur Wright piloted Wright Flyer III in a flight of 24 miles in 39 minutes, a world record that stood until 1908.

1910  Revolution in Portugal, monarchy overthrown, a republic declared .

1914  World War I’s first aerial combat resulting in a kill.

1930  British Airship R101 crashed in France en-route to India on its maiden voyage.

1936  The Jarrow March set off for London.

1942 Richard Street, American singer (The Temptations), was born.

1943  Steve Miller, American musician (Steve Miller Band), was born.

1944  Royal Canadian Air Force pilots shot down the first German jet fighter over France.

1944 – Suffrage was extended to women in France.

1945  Hollywood Black Friday: A six month strike by Hollywood set decorators turned into a bloody riot at the gates of Warner Brothers’ studios.

1947  The first televised White House address was given by PresidentHarry S. Truman.

1948  The 1948 Ashgabat earthquake killed 110,000.

1951 Irish singer Bob Geldof was born.

1953 The first documented recovery meeting of Narcotics Anonymouswas held.

1960 – David Kirk, All Black and businessman was born.

1962 – Dr. No, the first in the James Bond film series, was released.

1966  A partial core meltdown at the Enrico Fermi demonstration nuclear breeder reactor.

1968  Police baton civil rights demonstrators in Derry – considered to mark the beginning of The Troubles.

1969 The first episode of  Monty Python’s Flying Circus aired on BBC.

1970  The Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) was founded.

1970 British Trade Commissioner James Cross was kidnapped by members of the FLQ terrorist group.

1973  Signature of the European Patent Convention.

1974  Guildford pub bombings: bombs planted by the Provisional Irish Republican Army (IRA) killed four British soldiers and one civilian.

1975  – Kate Winslet, English actress was born.

1984  Marc Garneau became the first Canadian in space, aboard theSpace Shuttle Challenger.

1986  Israeli secret nuclear weapons were revealed. The British newspaperThe Sunday Times ran Mordechai Vanunu’s story on its front page under the headline: “Revealed — the secrets of Israel’s nuclear arsenal.”

1988  The Chilean opposition coalition Concertación (center-left) defeatedAugusto Pinochet in his re-election intentions.

1990 After one hundred and fifty years The Herald broadsheet newspaper in Melbourne, Australia, was published for the last time as a separate newspaper.

1991 An Indonesian military transport crashed after takeoff from Jakarta killing 137.

1991 – The first official version of the Linux kernel, version 0.02, was released.

1999  The Ladbroke Grove rail crash in west London killed 31 people.

2000  Mass demonstrations in Belgrade led to resignation of Serbian strongman Slobodan Milošević.

2001  Robert Stevens became the first victim in the 2001 anthrax attacks.

2011 – The MV Rena  ran aground on the Astrolabe reef near Tauranga,  resulting in an oil spill.

NZ Defence Force assistance to OP Rena.jpg

2011 – In the Mekong River massacre, two Chinese cargo boats were hijacked and 13 crew members murdered in the lawless Golden Triangle region of Southeast Asia.

2014 – Jules Bianchi crashed into a crane at the 2014 Japanese Grand Prix, leading to his subsequent death on 17 July 2015.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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