366 days of gratitude

August 21, 2016

We had dinner out at the home of friends on Thursday, take away pizza on Friday, dinner out at a restaurant last night (grilled halloumi, courgettes, and red peppers with beetroot, pistachios and salad greens – yum), and dinner out with a friend tonight (lamb rack).

That is more meals out this week than is usual in month or more and all were delicious.

Today I’m grateful for the availability and range of cafés and restaurants to choose from, the variety and quality of food they serve, the opportunity to dine at them and that doing so gave me a break from my usual role of chief cook in our house.


Willis claims bronze

August 21, 2016

Nick Willis claimed a bronze medal in the 1500m race.

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That gives New Zealand a best yet medal haul of 18 – four gold, nine silver and five bronze.

NZ Olympic Team's photo.

That puts us 19th in the gold medal ranking and 14th for total medals.

We’re 4th for medals per capita and weighted medals per capita and fith for golds per capita. 


Word of the day

August 21, 2016

Cerebrotonic – relating to or resembling a personality type characterised by shyness, introspection, and emotional restraint, and often associated with an ectomorphic physique; inclined to desire isolation; an emotionally restrained, introspective and shy person.


Listening for the Future

August 21, 2016

listening for the future StoryPeople print by Brian Andreas feminine

I’m on my way to the future, she said & I said, But you’re just sitting there listening & she smiled & said, It’s harder than you’d think with all the noise everyone else is making….

Listening for the Future  ©2016 Brian Andreas – posted with permission.

You can sign up for a daily email delivering a dose of whimsy like this at Story People.


Ko claims silver

August 21, 2016

Golfer Lydia Ko has won a silver medal.

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She showed a commendable sporting sense in her win:

. . . Ko was celebrating winning silver rather than commiserating a lost gold.

“You win a gold, silver or bronze medal this week. Sometimes people get carried away and say you ‘lost’ to someone but, no matter the result, you won. You’ve done great.

“Seeing athletes with these medals on tv affected me more than I ever imagined. Seeing other New Zealanders winning on social media made me want to make my contribution to the tally.”

Ko appreciated the support on course.

“Seeing athletes like [rower] Eric Murray or the women’s sevens team out here has been great. I feel like I played better hearing their support coming down the stretch. It felt like I was playing back home.”  . . . 

And:

“Having this silver medal is just a dream come true. The Olympics isn’t about [whether] somebody lost to another player. It celebrates each and every athlete and we’ve all won. This week has just been surreal.”

New Zealand is 19th on the medal table. New Zealand is 19th on the gold medal table and 14th for total medals.

The 17 medals won, four gold, nine silver and four bronze is the best yet.

 


Sunday soapbox

August 21, 2016

Sunday’s soapbox is yours to use as you will – within the bounds of decency and absence of defamation. You’re welcome to look back or forward, discuss issues of the moment, to pontificate, ponder or point us to something of interest, to educate, elucidate or entertain, amuse, bemuse or simply muse, but not abuse.

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When you go out into the woods and you look at trees, you see all these different trees. And some of them are bent, and some of them are straight, and some of them are evergreens, and some of them are whatever. And you look at the tree and you allow it.  You see why it is the way it is. You sort of understand that it didn’t get enough light, and so it turned that way. And you don’t get all emotional about it. You just allow it. You appreciate the tree. The minute you get near humans, you lose all that. And you are constantly saying “You’re too this, or I’m toothis.” That judgment mind comes in. And so I practice turning people into trees. Which means appreciating them just the way they are. – Ram Dass.


August 21 in history

August 21, 2016

1192  Minamoto Yoritomo became Seii Tai Shōgun and the de facto ruler of Japan.

1680  Pueblo Indians captured Santa Fe from Spanish during the Pueblo Revolt.

1689  The Battle of Dunkeld in Scotland.

1770  James Cook formally claimed eastern Australia for Great Britain, naming it New South Wales.

1772 King Gustav III completed his coup d’état by adopting a new Constitution, ending half a century of parliamentary rule in Sweden and installing himself as an enlightened despot.

1808 Battle of Vimeiro: British and Portuguese forces led by General Arthur Wellesley defeated French force under Major-General Jean-Andoche Junot.

1810  Jean-Baptiste Bernadotte, Marshal of France, was elected Crown Prince of Sweden by the Swedish Riksdag of the Estates.

1821  Jarvis Island was discovered by the crew of the ship, Eliza Frances.

1831  Nat Turner led black slaves and free blacks in a rebellion.

1863  Lawrence, Kansas was destroyed by Confederate guerrillas Quantrill’s Raiders in the Lawrence Massacre.

1878  The American Bar Association was founded.

1888  The first successful adding machine in the United States was patented by William Seward Burroughs.

1904  William “Count” Basie, American bandleader, was born  (d. 1984).

1911 Mona Lisa was stolen by a Louvre employee.

1915 – New Zealand troops attacked Hill 60 in the last offensive action fought by the New Zealanders during the Gallipoli campaign.

New Zealand mounteds attack Hill 60

1918   The Second Battle of the Somme began.

1920 Christopher Robin Milne, inspiration for the Winnie-the-Pooh stories, was born (d. 1996).

1930 Princess Margaret, Countess of Snowdon, was born  (d. 2002).

1942  Allied forces defeated an attack by Japanese Army soldiers in theBattle of the Tenaru.

1944  Dumbarton Oaks Conference, prelude to the United Nations, began.

1945  Physicist Harry K. Daghlian, Jr. was fatally irradiated during an experiment with the Demon core at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

1952 Glenn Hughes, British bassist and vocalist (Finders Keepers/Trapeze/Deep Purple), was born.

1952  Joe Strummer, British musician and singer (The Clash), was born  (d. 2002).

1958  Auckland became the first city in New Zealand to introduce the ‘Barnes Dance’ street-crossing system, which stopped all traffic and allowed pedestrians to cross intersections in every direction at the same time.

Auckland pedestrians begin 'Barnes Dance'

1959  President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed an executive order proclaiming Hawaii the 50th state of the union – now commemorated byHawaii Admission Day.

1963  Xa Loi Pagoda raids: the Army of the Republic of Vietnam Special Forces vandalised Buddhist pagodas across the country, arresting thousands and leaving an estimated hundreds dead.

1968  Warsaw Pact troops invade Czechoslovakia, crushing the Prague Spring and Nicolae Ceauşescu, leader of Communist Romania, publicly condemned the Soviet maneuver, encouraging the Romanian population to arm itself against possible Soviet reprisals.

1968  James Anderson, Jr. posthumously received the first Medal of Honor to be awarded to an African American U.S. Marine.

1969 Michael Dennis Rohan, an Australian, set the Al-Aqsa Mosque on fire.

1971  A bomb exploded in the Liberal Party campaign rally in Plaza Miranda, Manila, with several anti-Marcos political candidates injured.

1976  Operation Paul Bunyan at Panmunjeom, Korea.

1983  Philippine opposition leader Benigno Aquino, Jr. was assassinated at the Manila International Airport.

1986 Carbon dioxide gas erupted from volcanic Lake Nyos in Cameroon, killing up to 1,800 people within a 20-kilometer range.

1991  Latvia declared renewal of its full independence after the occupation of Soviet Union.

1991  Coup attempt against Mikhail Gorbachev collapsed.

1993  NASA lost contact with the Mars Observer spacecraft.

2001 – NATO decided to send a peace-keeping force to the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia.

2001 – The Red Cross announced that a famine was striking Tajikistan, and called for international financial aid for Tajikistan and Uzbekistan.

2007   Hurricane Dean made its first landfall in Costa Maya, Mexico with winds at 165 mph (266 km/h).

2013 – – Hundreds of people were reported killed by chemical attacks in the Ghouta region of Syria.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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